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Food & Wine

Humble shortbread cookie appears around the world, but with local twists

Humble shortbread cookie appears around the world, but with local twists


Blanche Shaheen/Special to the Town Crier
Ghraybeh shortbread cookies use sweet-tasting ghee in lieu of butter.

 

When Americans think of the shortbread cookie, they often imagine the traditional Scottish cookies, shaped like oblong rectangles and ...

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Your Health

CSA connects families with fresh, nutritious food

CSA connects families with fresh, nutritious food


Courtesy of Community Services Organization
CSA staff load groceries to take to Castro Elementary School as part of a new outreach program for children and families enrolled in the free and reduced lunch programs at Castro and Mistral schools.

Maureen...

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Your Home

Healing art: Restoration 'doctor' preserves damaged objects

Healing art: Restoration 'doctor' preserves damaged objects


Photos by Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Art restorer Rho Brown performs delicate preservation work in her Los Altos studio, above. Once fully restored, below left, it’s difficult to tell which cherub was previously missing its head. Brown’s studio conta...

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On The Road

American muscle in the modern age: Bolting to Blackhawk in the Chrysler 300S

American muscle in the modern age: Bolting to Blackhawk in the Chrysler 300S


Photo by Gary Anderson/Special to the Town Crier; Bottom Right Photo courtesy of Chrysler
The Andersons recently drove the new Chrysler 300S to Danville’s Blackhawk Museum, where they saw “The Spirit of the Old West” exhibition.

 

When you have a p...

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Senior Lifestyles

Local pianist performs, volunteers and finds 'keys' to a good life

Local pianist performs, volunteers and finds 'keys' to a good life


RAMYA KRISHNA/TOWN CRIER
Doreta Strotman performs the classics with her signature jazz-style improvisations at Los Altos Grill Sunday evenings. The Mountain View resident has been playing since the age of 4.

Sunday evenings, Doreta Strotman’s job is to...

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Wedding To Remember

Ring options on Main Street range from traditional to unorthodox

Ring options on Main Street range from traditional to unorthodox


 

With nine fine-jewelry retailers concentrated along the Main Street corridor, downtown Los Altos offers a wealth of options for engagement and wedding ring shoppers. From one end of Main to the other, the choices range from the traditional to t...

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Your Kids

Living Classroom grows lessons for next-gen science standards

Living Classroom grows lessons for next-gen science standards


 

Providing local students with a tangible outdoor learning experience, the Living Classroom program aims to support a new generation of students who are excited about the environment.

The Living Classroom serves 9,000 students locally in the Los ...

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Back to School

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Leveling the playing field for women on the job

Women often claim they have a difficult time playing on the same field as men who seem to know the game. As I travel across the country, I hear the same song: Women find it difficult to infiltrate the "Good Old Boys Club" and gain positional power.

I am neither skeptical nor prejudiced about men in the workplace. I believe that gender inequities will shift and balance out in the long run. But men did enter the workplace long before women.

Women don't support each other in ways that could help their female colleagues to advance. When I say that, women claim:

• " I had to work so hard to get here, I didn't have the time to look around for my sister employees."

• "I did not think I was ignoring others, I just had such an important job to do that I didn't look around."

• "My boss and mentor kept me completely focused on my own goals."

• "I don't have a woman model who is helping other women, beyond the token gestures and speeches."

• "My mentors are men, and men seem to take care of each other in different ways."

• "I don't know how to help other women. We all seem so independently tough."

• "My colleagues don't look in need of my support. I guess we don't want to look weak or dependent."

To raise your visibility and heighten your opportunities as a woman, don't hesitate to plant seeds of interest. Try: "John, you know I expect to grow in this organization, and I want to help you to see my attributes through my reports. I hope to progress here with great speed and will do what it takes. With your help, I do hope to get there."

Broaden your sphere of influence around the company by volunteering for special projects, writing white papers, going out of your way to meet people and capitalizing on changes. Try: "I know we are reorganizing this unit, and I would like to be considered for one of the new positions called for in this change." Or, better yet: "I've been thinking about your dilemma, John, over the changes, and I have an idea of how I can help. My capacity to create something new in this arena may solve some of the problems."

Learn the unspoken rules from your male confidants. Some of the rules are helpful and some are playful. You don't have to learn your boss's favorite sport, but you could recite a score now and again. Your response to inequality should be to move forward and look so professional that you can't be ignored. Women are not victims of men on the job, they are victims of a late and slow start in the marketplace - and the magnificent lure of motherhood and the consequent confusion about how simultaneously to self-promote and balance a career and a family.

Jean A. Hollands, M.S., is founder and chairwoman of the Growth and Leadership Center in Mountain View. For more information, call 966-1144 or visit www.glcweb.com.

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