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Food & Wine

Humble shortbread cookie appears around the world, but with local twists

Humble shortbread cookie appears around the world, but with local twists


Blanche Shaheen/Special to the Town Crier
Ghraybeh shortbread cookies use sweet-tasting ghee in lieu of butter.

 

When Americans think of the shortbread cookie, they often imagine the traditional Scottish cookies, shaped like oblong rectangles and ...

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Your Health

CSA connects families with fresh, nutritious food

CSA connects families with fresh, nutritious food


Courtesy of Community Services Organization
CSA staff load groceries to take to Castro Elementary School as part of a new outreach program for children and families enrolled in the free and reduced lunch programs at Castro and Mistral schools.

Maureen...

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Your Home

Healing art: Restoration 'doctor' preserves damaged objects

Healing art: Restoration 'doctor' preserves damaged objects


Photos by Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Art restorer Rho Brown performs delicate preservation work in her Los Altos studio, above. Once fully restored, below left, it’s difficult to tell which cherub was previously missing its head. Brown’s studio conta...

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On The Road

American muscle in the modern age: Bolting to Blackhawk in the Chrysler 300S

American muscle in the modern age: Bolting to Blackhawk in the Chrysler 300S


Photo by Gary Anderson/Special to the Town Crier; Bottom Right Photo courtesy of Chrysler
The Andersons recently drove the new Chrysler 300S to Danville’s Blackhawk Museum, where they saw “The Spirit of the Old West” exhibition.

 

When you have a p...

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Senior Lifestyles

Local pianist performs, volunteers and finds 'keys' to a good life

Local pianist performs, volunteers and finds 'keys' to a good life


RAMYA KRISHNA/TOWN CRIER
Doreta Strotman performs the classics with her signature jazz-style improvisations at Los Altos Grill Sunday evenings. The Mountain View resident has been playing since the age of 4.

Sunday evenings, Doreta Strotman’s job is to...

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Wedding To Remember

Ring options on Main Street range from traditional to unorthodox

Ring options on Main Street range from traditional to unorthodox


 

With nine fine-jewelry retailers concentrated along the Main Street corridor, downtown Los Altos offers a wealth of options for engagement and wedding ring shoppers. From one end of Main to the other, the choices range from the traditional to t...

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Your Kids

Living Classroom grows lessons for next-gen science standards

Living Classroom grows lessons for next-gen science standards


 

Providing local students with a tangible outdoor learning experience, the Living Classroom program aims to support a new generation of students who are excited about the environment.

The Living Classroom serves 9,000 students locally in the Los ...

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Back to School

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Don't let finances tie your marriage up in knots

June - the most popular month for weddings - is around the corner. That means many couples about to take the plunge are spending much of their time shopping for the perfect gown, flowers and reception location.

Unfortunately, most couples are so busy planning their wedding that they don't take time to discuss how they will manage their finances after they walk down the aisle. Getting adjusted to married life can be a challenge in itself. Mounting bills from wedding expenses and the cost of setting up a household can add to the stress. Here's a checklist to help you think about financial matters before and after marriage:

Joint checking accounts, individual accounts or a combination. If you are a newly married couple, you may want to establish a joint checking account. A joint account forces you to be accountable to each other about where your money is going. Keeping separate accounts can encourage unnecessary spending under the radar of your partner.

Savings goals. How much of your income do you plan to save and how will you do it? A rule of thumb is to save 10 percent of your gross income through automatic monthly withdrawals deposited into an investment account. In addition, you should have a minimum of three months of savings within reach for emergency expenses.

Retirement plans. If both of you have a 401(k) plan offered by your employer, at a minimum, invest in each plan up to the level where you get each employer's full matching contribution. You should also have a savings plan outside of your 401(k) so that you have access to funds without penalty. If you aren't eligible to contribute to a 401(k), invest in a Roth Individual Retirement Account, which allows tax-free withdrawals at retirement if you follow the rules.

Employer benefits. Examine the health, dental and other benefits each of your employers provides. Compare deductibles, co-payments, benefits provided and monthly costs. If you don't have children, you still should purchase life insurance to replace your salary if you die. If you do have children, a general rule is to purchase enough life insurance to cover eight times your combined annual salaries.

Investment accounts. This can be a sensitive subject for many people who've accumulated wealth on their own and now are faced with sharing it with their spouse. Depending on the significance of your wealth, you would be wise to explore financial- and estate-planning matters both before and after marriage.

Investment personality. Your investment portfolio should reflect how much risk each of you is willing to take in achieving your joint goals. Do you feel comfortable investing in stocks or would you prefer more conservative investments such as bonds or CDs? These are questions you should ask each other and then talk to a financial consultant who can recommend securities that match your objectives, time frame and risk tolerance.

Budget expectations. Do you both agree on how much should be spent on discretionary expenses such as clothes, dining out and home-improvement projects? The best way is to agree on a monthly amount for every expense that is not fixed (i.e. mortgage payment) and stick to that amount. This can prevent a lot of disagreements down the road when you discover your spouse has spent money on something you think is unnecessary.

Steve Zeller is a financial consultant with A.G. Edwards & Sons., Inc .

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