09252017Mon
Last updateWed, 20 Sep 2017 9am

Inside Mountain View

46th annual festival slated this weekend

46th annual festival slated this weekend

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Food & Wine

New breweries are thriving on the Peninsula

New breweries are thriving on the Peninsula

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Your Health

Local woman makes 155-mile journey to raise money to fight Lyme Disease

Local woman makes 155-mile journey to raise money to fight Lyme Disease

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Your Home

Enchanting decor: Enchanté Boutique Hotel showcases Francophile's flair for design

Enchanting decor: Enchanté Boutique Hotel showcases Francophile's flair for design

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On The Road

A three-pack of fun

A three-pack of fun

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Senior Lifestyles

Resident poet's parody song honors inspiring story

Resident poet's parody song honors inspiring story

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Wedding To Remember

Wedding wear that lies beneath

Wedding wear that lies beneath

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Your Kids

Living Classroom grows lessons for next-gen science standards

Living Classroom grows lessons for next-gen science standards

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Back to School

Changing the conversation on social media

Changing the conversation on social media

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Turn students into recycling heroes

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, only 30 percent of consumer waste is recycled each year, which presents an opportunity for children to use their green thumbs and take part in saving the planet.

Following are a few ways to get children started.

• Show paper some TLC. Paper accounts for as much as 50 percent of landfill space. Rather than add to the waste, implement an easily accessed designated paper recycling bin where you use paper most in the home or the classroom.

Better still, put paper products to good use by challenging children to create paper craft projects. Then recycle any scraps when finished.

• Get crafty. In addition to paper products, all kinds of waste can be “upcycled” into useful or decorative items. For example, a painted egg carton can make a unique storage box for small objects like beads or paper clips, and tissue paper glued to a clean spaghetti sauce jar makes an attractive vase. The possibilities are endless – you will not only save trash from a landfill, you will inspire creativity.

• Better together. Recycling is often more effective when multiple people take part. Teachers can set a goal for their classrooms, schools or even individual students to recycle a specified amount of paper, plastics, aluminum and glass before the end of the school year.

Parents can support the effort by encouraging children not only to recycle at home, but also to take recyclable materials into the classroom to participate in the school’s project.

• Adopt a program. Encouraging children to take part in a recycling-focused program can develop valuable habits while promoting fun.

One such program is the Elmer’s Glue Crew Recycling Program, a classroom resource designed to teach children how they can be environmentally responsible. Throughout the year, the classroom or school collects empty glue bottles and glue sticks to recycle through TerraCycle.

For more information, visit ElmersGlueCrew.com or Facebook.com/GlueCrew.

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