George Maciag

On Tuesday August 31, George Maciag passed away from complications due to heart disease. He was 86 years old.

Raised in Jersey City, New Jersey, George earned a bachelor’s degree from Seton Hall University and later an MBA from Pepperdine.  After college, he became a 1st Lieutenant in the Marine Corps where a Colonel took a chance on a young officer and put him in charge of the food service at the base in Quantico, Virginia.  This sparked George’s love for the food service industry where he spent his 40 plus year career: first at Saga Corporation and then at Guckenheimer Enterprises, where he served as President.  In 2000, George was recognized for his contributions to the foodservice industry as a winner of the Silver Plate award for extraordinary operator achievements and industry excellence.

Family and faith were at the center of George’s life.  He met his wife Mary Ellen at a dance at St. Vincent’s nursing school in New York when a nun said to her, “go over and talk to those boys. You can’t tell, but you might meet the man that you are going to marry.”  George is survived by his wife of 63 years, four children: Frank Maciag (Denise), Julie Panaccione (Carlo), Mike Maciag (Elizabeth) and Chris Maciag, and his seven grandchildren.  George was an active member of Saint Nicholas church from the time that he and his family moved to California in 1974.

George loved to cook and is remembered for his meals, whether it be for a small gathering at his home with Mary Ellen or one of their famous themed parties celebrating food and culture from around the world.  He was also first to volunteer to prepare food for events at his children’s schools, parish church, or his community at Creekside Oaks. George also loved music — he sang, played the banjo, dabbled with the guitar, and played a mean harmonica.

From his childhood on the Jersey Shore through years sailing, power boating, and fishing on the San Francisco Bay, to spending time at their home in Monterey, George loved to spend time on or near the water with family and friends.  George made a personal connection with everyone he met and was an important part of his many communities; he will be deeply missed.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Stanford Medicine.

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