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Mountain View City Council race: Nine candidates for four seats

The issue of housing – or lack thereof – takes center stage as nine candidates vie for four seats on the seven-seat Mountain View City Council in the Nov. 3 election.

Los Altos’ neighbor experienced rapid growth in housing and commercial development prior to the pandemic. But some observers argue that growth marginalized those with low incomes. The average cost of a one-bedroom apartment at market rate is nearly $2,500 a month, according to rental site Zumper.com. It’s a significant drop, due to the pandemic, from the $4,000 figure reported at the end of 2017.

Rents dramatically increased more than 50% over a four-year period from 2011 to 2015, city statistics report, prompting a resident-initiated rent control measure that passed in 2016. Renters make up more than 60% of all Mountain View households.

The ongoing housing deficit has prompted the proliferation of vehicle dwellers parked on city streets. Measure C on the Nov. 3 ballot would ban parking of oversized vehicles on streets 40 feet wide or narrower. Proponents cite public health and safety concerns. Opponents see it as an attempt to banish the homeless, enabling gentrification and decreasing diversity.

Below are Q&A-style interviews with each candidate, conducted via Zoom or phone. The conversations have been edited for length and clarity.

Margaret Abe-Koga

Margaret Abe-Koga
Abe-Koga

Margaret Abe-Koga, first elected to the Mountain View City Council in 2006, is the council’s longest-serving current member. She termed-out in 2014 after serving two terms but was re-elected in 2016. She currently serves as mayor and has lived in the city since 1998.

For more information on Abe-Koga’s campaign, visit reelectmak2020.com.

Why are you running for city council?
This year as mayor has certainly been a challenging one, with the pandemic, wildfires and civil unrest. Although it has been very challenging, it’s actually reaffirmed my commitment to my community.

It’s also important at this critical time to have the experience and knowledge I’ve gained over those 12 years. I was mayor back in 2009, during the Great Recession, so I have experience leading through crisis.

What strengths would you bring to the council, and why should voters choose you?
I’m the longest-serving council member and demonstrated leadership getting our city through challenging times.

I also have led game-changing efforts. One was raising the minimum wage to $15. Silicon Valley Clean Energy was something I pushed for originally. I was VTA chair way back in 2011 and honed my understanding of transportation. If you look at my record, I’m very results oriented.

What do you see as the three most pressing issues the city is facing, and how would you address them?
No. 1 is the economy and economic development tied to COVID. Our local economy has been hurt and small businesses are really struggling. That’s a big challenge in terms of city revenue, because we rely on our businesses as our revenue engine.
Climate change has been something I’ve really focused on – serving on the Silicon Valley Clean Energy board, helping to launch that agency. I’ve also pushed for alternative transportation options.

Then of course, housing and transportation. We have rezoned to allow for 15,000 more units, with 7,500 already in the pipeline. If all that gets built, we will increase our housing supply by 65%.

What do you think of Mountain View’s current rent control laws? Should they be improved or scrapped?
I’m not a fan of rent control, but with the enormous increases in rent, I understand why there was interest in having some caps.

Over the last three years, we have found challenges, mainly because of the way it was written ambiguously. One issue is whether it covers mobile home residents. We now have a lawsuit on that issue.

We had a ballot measure in March to try to clarify some of those areas. It didn’t pass, so we continue to have challenges.

How do you think the city should handle the abundance of vehicle dwellers?
With the vehicle dwellers, I have supported a balanced approach. We have opened safe parking lots and have three now up and running. On any street with bike lanes, we restricted parking, which was noncontroversial. We also restrict parking of oversized vehicles on narrow streets. It’s not a total ban – a third of the streets are not narrow streets.

Ultimately, the safe parking lots and finding more stable housing is the solution. Just letting oversized vehicle dwellers stay on the streets is not a solution.

Are you concerned about gentrification, that new tech workers are displacing longtime residents? How should this issue be addressed?
With the economy being so robust in the last several years, we have seen more tech employees coming to live in Mountain View. We’ve seen prices go up and so we’ve seen displacement.

Part of it goes back to rent control. You need some incentive for property owners to want to stay in the business. Rent control makes it very difficult.

We continue to work on building affordable housing. Our BMR (below market rate) unit count when I first started was around 500. We’re now up to about 2,500, including the ones in the pipeline for development.

José Gutiérrez

Jose Gutierrez
Gutierrez

José Gutiérrez, candidate for Mountain View City Council, currently serves on the Mountain View Whisman School District’s Board of Trustees. He was appointed in 2015 and then elected in 2016. Gutierrez has lived in Mountain View for 20 years and works as a paralegal specialist at PayPal.

For more information on Gutierrez’s campaign, visit jose4citycouncil.com.

Why are you running for city council?
I want to make a difference. In Mountain View, we’re at a crossroads where two groups are coming from opposite perspectives. That’s similar to when I joined the Mountain View Whisman board. We had a dysfunctional board. I like to build consensus and think about differences of opinion as an opportunity for change.

What strengths would you bring to the council, and why should voters choose you?
If you’ve paid attention to what the school board’s done in the last five years, we’re not a fractured group like before. We’re able to agree to disagree with respect, courtesy and professionalism.

We have a superintendent who’s been on board for five years, and in that time, we’ve increased teacher salaries and revamped health-care benefits. We worked with the city council and FortBay to develop 144 apartment units that will be dedicated to school district teachers and staff, along with city employees.

What do you see as the three most pressing issues the city is facing, and how would you address them?
First, the COVID-19 economic situation. There’s nothing coming down the construction pipeline. People are reassessing and the recession is a reality.

The second point is affordable housing. For our seniors and our disabled community, why aren’t we creating partnerships with the county to make housing happen? We’ve also got a big group who’s priced out. Why not start thinking about targeting those groups for affordable housing?

Third is community building. We need to figure out how to reconcile the views within the city, because they’re so divergent.

What do you think of Mountain View’s current rent control laws? Should they be improved or scrapped?
It’s been passed, so I’m looking at it as something we can build from. I’ve got a different vantage point because I’m a renter and I’ve been priced out.

I’m for what we have now, and I also want to make it better. I encouraged our superintendent to endorse Measure V, which he did. We looked at how it would reduce anxiety in our students concerned about their parents paying rent.
When you have rent control, it’s because there’s an urgent need to keep the social, economic and cultural diversity of the city.

How do you think the city should handle the abundance of vehicle dwellers?
We need to do more, and this is bad timing to put something on the ballot, because we don’t have enough safe spaces for them to be able to move to.

The people who are running for office again had the chance to take action. Instead, it was study after study. It was the second council, the one serving now, that actually took action on safe parking. That’s too long of a delay to get something done.

Are you concerned about gentrification, that new tech workers are displacing longtime residents? How should this issue be addressed?
If you bought in Mountain View back in the day, you may not look at gentrification the same way as someone who’s been priced out or can’t afford to buy a home.

You’re seeing the middle class and working class, whatever we have left, struggling to make ends meet and leaving the Bay Area in droves. A new set of community members are coming in, because of the luxury apartment rentals being built. You might not look at gentrification as such an important thing, but when you’re in the middle of it like I am, I look at it as a daily challenge.

John Lashlee

John Lashlee
Lashlee

John Lashlee is among the challengers vying for a seat on the Mountain View City Council. Originally from North Carolina, he moved to the Bay Area in 2015. He works as a data scientist at LinkedIn Corp.

For more information on Lashlee’s campaign, visit votelashlee.com.

Why are you running for city council?
I helped found the Silicon Valley Democratic Socialists of America branch here. Every time we would go up against the city council, it was like an immovable object; it didn’t matter how much public comment you churned out, it didn’t matter how many emails you sent. It really almost didn’t matter how much you organized outside the meeting. The city council was stopping a lot of our ways we wanted to improve our community. I really feel strongly that normal, 9-to-5 working people like me have to run for city council to have a voice on the city council.

What strengths would you bring to the council, and why should voters choose you?
I intend to be the kind of person who is always that resolute, steadfast voice for workers and renters on the city council. I won’t be afraid when the California Apartment Association comes in and says, “If you make it too pro-renter, we’ll sue you.” I’d say, “Take a hike,” because I’m there for the renters of Mountain View.

What do you see as the three most pressing issues the city is facing, and how would you address them?
The most pressing issue is our upcoming eviction wave. Right now, an eviction is a public health crisis. It creates another vector through which to spread coronavirus. The second one is, in general, the pandemic recovery. We need to get serious about rent relief and provision of goods and services such as food for people who are at risk of getting sick. The third big issue is Mountain View has a worse racially biased arrest record than 68% of California police departments, and that is a livability crisis for our Black and Latinx neighbors, who are being arrested at rates much higher than their prevalence in the population.

What do you think of Mountain View’s current rent control laws? Should they be improved or scrapped?
We have to protect our rent control law. I am in favor of not just playing defense, defense, defense, like we’ve been doing over the last four years. I want to expand renter protections in Mountain View, and one example is I favor implementing a municipally funded legal representation for residents who are facing eviction.

How do you think the city should handle the abundance of vehicle dwellers?
I’m campaigning to not pass the RV ban because I don’t want to displace anyone during the pandemic. I believe what we have to do is build that centrally located safe parking program and make sure you have access to mobile showers, access to case workers to get these RV residents – our neighbors – into transitional housing and out of RVs or cars, and access to waste disposal, and make sure we have a program that can serve all of the RV resident population of Mountain View.

Are you concerned about gentrification, that new tech workers are displacing longtime residents? How should this issue be addressed?
When we have new housing, we have to monitor displacement and we have to create public safeguards against displacement.

I’m in favor of building public housing. We have tried to build our way out of a crisis with private housing, and it has not worked.

When we build public housing, we can make sure that we set aside the needs of the people who are low income or who would be displaced otherwise.

Sally Lieber

Sally Lieber
Lieber

Sally Lieber is once again running for a seat on the Mountain View City Council after serving as a council member from 1998 to 2002. She then launched a successful campaign for California State Assembly. Originally from Detroit, she moved to the area 24 years ago.

For more information on Lieber’s campaign, visit sallylieber.org.

Why are you running for city council?
The local level is the most important point of contact for people. And I think it should be a place that is the most responsive level, that has activism and insight into the county and into the state.

But I think the buck really stops with the local level. This is just such a sensitive time for public health, for the housing crisis. Right now while we’re very focused on COVID and the fires, there is still a need to focus on the climate crisis.

What strengths would you bring to the council, and why should voters choose you?
When I came into the State Assembly, I was immediately faced with a $29.5 billion shortfall, and it was the largest shortfall in California history. And I was really kind of intimidated by that, but I found I was able to navigate that situation in a way that was sensitive to people’s needs and just good governance. So I think that that’s my strongest quality in coming back on city council, that I’ve had that experience and I’m probably even better at a crisis than when things are going well.

What do you see as the three most pressing issues the city is facing, and how would you address them?
The housing crisis, the need for additional environmental protection and social justice and public health.

What do you think of Mountain View’s current rent control laws? Should they be improved or scrapped?
I am a strong supporter of our current rent control laws, but I want to see the voters extending that to mobile home parks. And I think we have to do a lot more to retain the affordable housing that we have to create new affordable housing.

I am opposing the ban on vehicle dwellers that will be on the November ballot. I think it’s just absolutely the wrong time to chase people around in circles. We’ve got to figure out how to work with them instead. I’m very keen on really seeing how we can bring additional help to renters and homeowners and renters in the mobile home parks in Mountain View.

How do you think the city should handle the abundance of vehicle dwellers?
This is going to increase in the future, and the city has taken some steps toward safe parking. But safe parking where people have to move their home throughout the day does not work, and that leaves people still on the streets. So I’m eager to see safe parking that’s distributed and is near schools and services. I’m not eager to see families put out in industrial areas, and I think we have to face the fact that for seniors, and particularly for senior women, and in particular families of modest means, the RVs are going to be part of our future.

Are you concerned about gentrification, that new tech workers are displacing longtime residents? How should this issue be addressed?
Yeah, I’m very concerned about that. We’ve seen a lot of speculation in Mountain View, a lot of community members have been priced out of the community here. A lot of kids who grew up here have no way of staying in Mountain View, and I think it’s really going to hurt us in the long run because we’re not going to have the health care workers that we need, the home care workers that we need, the elder care workers that we need, the child care workers that we need.

Lisa Matichak

Lisa Matichak
Matichak

Lisa Matichak was elected to the Mountain View City Council in 2016 and is running to keep her seat. She has lived in Mountain View for more than 20 years and works in the tech industry.

For more information on Matichak’s campaign, visit lisaforcouncil.com.

Why are you running for city council?
I’m running for re-election to continue to champion strong neighborhoods and a great quality of life for the residents of Mountain View. I want to preserve the character and diversity of our city and help our small businesses thrive. And I want to keep our sustainability plans on track so that we meet our carbon emission reduction goals.

What strengths would you bring to the council, and why should voters choose you?
What I bring to the council is leadership, and I think I’ve demonstrated that over the past four years. Also listening skills – I think it’s really important to listen to residents, businesses and my colleagues on the council.

I bring 10 years of land-use experience. The council addresses a lot of land-use issues and sometimes they’re quite complicated. I bring good experience in sorting through that information and coming up with a great solution.

What do you see as the three most pressing issues the city is facing, and how would you address them?
The most pressing issue is how to help residents and small businesses recover from the pandemic. The city has done a good job of trying to help our residents, especially renters, by providing rental assistance. We’re working with small businesses and set up a zero-interest loan program. What’s most important is to understand what’s happening at the state and county level and to be responsive to our residents and businesses.

Helping the city itself recover is also important. I want to make sure we have structurally balanced budgets going forward. I want to open the city as much as we can, in a way that is safe.

Another important issue is sustainability. We have an aggressive sustainability action plan that requires significant investment. The city’s financials are going to be under pressure, so we need to figure out how we keep sustainability on track.

What do you think of Mountain View’s current rent control laws? Should they be improved or scrapped?

I do have concerns about rent control in general, but Mountain View does have a rent control charter amendment in place.

It’s important for the Rental Housing Committee to continue to define processes and procedures that go along with implementing the CSFRA (Community Stabilization and Fair Rent Act), and continue to interpret where language is not clear.

If we’re going to do rent stabilization for mobile homes, it should be done as an ordinance through the city council. Most cities follow that path.

How do you think the city should handle the abundance of vehicle dwellers?
We’ve invested over $2 million to help not only folks living in vehicles, but folks who are homeless in general. We can continue to partner with the county and Community Services Agency.

I do have concerns about the oversized vehicles parked on narrow streets. It does pose health and safety concerns that we are trying to address.

We do have the safe parking lots. I think we will be able to accommodate everyone who meets our criteria in the safe lots, as well as on streets wider than 40 feet.

Are you concerned about gentrification, that new tech workers are displacing longtime residents? How should this issue be addressed?
Gentrification is an issue and it does concern me. We tried to help in the short term by providing assistance for those who might be displaced. Now there’s SB 330, which will also help.

The council is also going to have a study session on additional things we can do to address displacement and gentrification.

Alex Nunez

Alex Nunez
Nunez

Alex Nunez is running for a seat on the Mountain View City Council. He works as a cybersecurity adviser in Mountain View and has been involved in community organizations in the city.

For more information on Nunez’s campaign, visit alexnunezforcouncil.com.

Why are you running for city council?
I’m motivated by a fundamental belief that it is the role and responsibility of government to work for addressing and promoting the general welfare of the community. After many years working with the Mountain View community, I’ve seen people in need ask city council to enable them to have a fighting shot against a growing chasm of inequality in our society. And quite frankly, I’ve seen that many times just not being responded to.

What strengths would you bring to the council, and why should voters choose you?
I am someone who has become integrated with a broad spectrum of community groups in Los Altos – across issues like environmental, housing production, tenants and renters rights and transit. I have a very close connection to the pulse of the people’s needs and what they want. A lot of this reflects in my fundraising.

I’ve done a lot of work organizing with residents at risk of displacement and having to take on a significant understanding of land-use policy. A lot of what council does is engage in land-use decisions.

What do you see as the three most pressing issues the city is facing, and how would you address them?
It’s super critical to address the recovery of COVID-19, but also acknowledge that unless we act, there will be a major wave of eviction and increased homelessness and associated strain on our public resources, our social services.

Housing is a key issue. I want to make sure we address housing by preventing any projects that happen in Mountain View from reducing our overall housing supply.
The last part is environmental. The fires are getting closer. We need to implement microgrid technology and distribute energy resources across our city to make sure our first responders are able to have some reliable form of backup power.

What do you think of Mountain View’s current rent control laws? Should they be improved or scrapped?
We need to strengthen our rent control laws. We need to end the status of the rental housing committee as a committee that is captured by the industry it is intended to regulate. I believe we need to grow our way out of rent control. I’m not in favor of rent control being the end all be all.

How do you think the city should handle the abundance of vehicle dwellers?
This has been an issue that has been tearing our community apart. Mountain View cannot shoulder the burden for Santa Clara County’s housing issues. We need to identify places in commercial areas where we can allow some form of on-street parking for oversized vehicles. We need to increase our supply of safe parking to a point. We need to also couple that with temporary housing.

Are you concerned about gentrification, that new tech workers are displacing longtime residents? How should this issue be addressed?
I believe that it is possible to have development without the displacement of people who live there. It’s within the city council’s ability to establish rules and regulations that would guarantee that all new development is replacing the housing that current residents are living in and also provide a right of return and cover temporary housing for those residents.

Paul Roales

Paul Roales
Roales

Paul Roales is running for a seat on the Mountain View City Council. He grew up near the Illinois-Indiana border and moved to the Bay Area five and a half years ago. He works as a software engineer for Waymo.

For more information on Roales’ campaign, visit paulroales.com.

Why are you running for city council?
The city of Mountain View moves way too slow and often responds to a problem in our community with too small of a response. I want to change that culture, and that really goes across the huge number of issues from housing to police reform to social justice, etc. That is based on my experience being on the city council of a town that was very similar to Mountain View in West Lafayette, Ind., where I just saw how much faster things got done there. and just the whole culture of how we approach problems resulted in more community input.

What strengths would you bring to the council, and why should voters choose you?
Having worked at a number of very productive, highly performing organizations outside of government is definitely a benefit I can bring to the council. Government cannot act like a private organization for lots of good reasons, but certainly there’s a lot of culture that can be brought over. Currently on the city council, for a town that has a huge amount of tech as its backbone, for no one on the city council to have a tech background is quite unusual.

What do you see as the three most pressing issues the city is facing, and how would you address them?
The city needs to do more to stop the spread of COVID in our community. The city’s left a lot of that up to the county so far, and that’s not been super helpful. The city has a $350-million-a-year budget, 600 full-time staffers. Some of that can be redirected to stopping COVID. Housing is a dramatically important issue in our community. And then modernizing our operations, looking at things like what’s going on in Sunnyvale with a joint police and fire department. By having a merged public safety department, it allows you to have a lot more different types of response.

What do you think of Mountain View’s current rent control laws? Should they be improved or scrapped?
We’ve seen voters approve them twice now basically, and by a 70% vote in the spring. So we need to see how these play out for a few years. We need to give them a chance to see how they settle into the market, see their effect on the market, before we start modifying them. Measure D in the spring, I voted “no” on that. It was just too early to start tinkering on the edges of it.

How do you think the city should handle the abundance of vehicle dwellers?
The city has a giant parking lot right next to Shoreline Amphitheatre that they’re not utilizing at all today. It could definitely be used to provide safe parking spots for vehicle dwellers. Right now, they’re just providing a tiny little lot right next to fire station No. 5, and there’s a massive parking lot behind it which is completely unutilized.

Are you concerned about gentrification, that new tech workers are displacing longtime residents? How should this issue be addressed?
That is a concern. I think it’s solved by building lots and lots of housing so there’s plenty of housing for everyone and no one gets displaced.

Looking at this on an individual project basis is helpful for the individuals in that project, but we really need to stop looking at individual projects on the city council, and we need to start thinking more on long-term strategy for housing.

Pat Showalter

Pat Showalter
Showalter

Pat Showalter is running again for Mountain View City Council after serving as a councilwoman from 2015 to 2018 (her re-election bid fell short). She was mayor in 2016. Showalter, a civil engineer, has lived in the city for 36 years.
For more information on Showalter’s campaign, visit patshowalter.com.

Why are you running for city council?
Now more than ever we need leaders who know how to get things done. My government service both as an elected official and a civil servant has taught me how to get things accomplished in our local and regional government. Serving on the Mountain View City Council is the best way right now for me to make a difference on housing, justice and climate-change issues.

What strengths would you bring to the council, and why should voters choose you?
I have good collaboration skills. I have a technical background as a civil engineer. That applies directly to infrastructure issues and environmental protection decisions. I’m the only candidate who is an active, long-standing member of the labor union. I understand the importance between good management and labor relations. And I have a reputation for listening.

What do you see as the three most pressing issues the city is facing, and how would you address them?
The eviction potential is a huge issue. I think that continuing the eviction moratorium is real important.

Second, we need to get on top of the racial justice issues we’ve all been made well aware of in the last few months. We have an obligation to look at our community, our own systems and see what we can we do to improve them.

Another thing I think is real important is transportation. In the next couple years, people are going to be very reluctant to take public transportation. We need to make sure that we encourage people to bike and walk as much as possible and continue efforts to make the streets feel more safe for bikes and improve our biking infrastructure.

What do you think of Mountain View’s current rent control laws? Should they be improved or scrapped?
I am a supporter of the rent control law. We don’t want anybody evicted, but at the same time, landlords need to make ends meet as well. I feel like the Community Stabilization and Fair Rent Act is protecting a large portion of Mountain View renters from displacement. I am against weakening it.

How do you think the city should handle the abundance of vehicle dwellers?
This is a difficult issue. The city can be proud of all the things they’ve done to help the homeless.

I don’t think anybody believes RVs should be living on the streets. It’s not good for people to be living in vehicles, or in tents or park benches. But that’s the reality. During the pandemic, we want to make sure that people have shelter. We need to increase the safe parking program. We need to find appropriate places for those vehicles to park.

Another thing that’s important is having case workers. I’m proposing we get a training program going for volunteers. They’ll work under a professional case worker. We can help a lot more people and get them into appropriate housing.

Are you concerned about gentrification, that new tech workers are displacing longtime residents? How should this issue be addressed?
One of the things that has distinguished Mountain View from the surrounding communities is our economic diversity. We like it that way. It’s been harder and harder for people to stay. But we need the essential-worker jobs. We need those people in our community, and we welcome them.

I am concerned with gentrification. The key is to get the supply up to the point where there is enough housing for everybody.

Lenny Siegel

Lenny Siegel
Siegel

Lenny Siegel is running again for the Mountain View City Council after a stint from 2015 to 2018 (his re-election bid fell short). He served as mayor in 2018. Siegel has lived in Mountain View since 1972 and serves as executive director of the Center for Public Environmental Oversight.

For more information on Siegel’s campaign, visit lennysiegelforcouncil.org.

Why are you running for city council?
Mountain View is a community that treasures socioeconomic and cultural diversity. I see the current council majority is falling behind on that measure. That’s why I’m running. I’m not only running for myself, but I’m hoping that others who share my views will be elected. Locally, there’s a big split between the incumbent and candidates in terms of housing justice issues.

What strengths would you bring to the council, and why should voters choose you?
I have a wealth of experience in the issues I talked about, but also in transportation, working with schools and the environment. Mountain View is a national leader in the development of housing on contaminated sites’ safety, and I have a lot of knowledge. I’m also a community organizer. I’ve organized a series of groups in Mountain View.

What do you see as the three most pressing issues the city is facing, and how would you address them?
The first is COVID-19. The city is doing a fairly good job, but we don’t have much data. I fear an eviction and mortgage time bomb when those bills become due. The first thing I would do is I would ask for better data on the condition of our community.
The second is housing justice. Mountain View has to continue building housing, have rent based on the income of residents and extend rent control to mobile home residents.

The third is transportation. We need to improve our local transit because VTA doesn’t care about us. We need to create a community shuttle that clears the San Antonio corridor along with Palo Alto and Los Altos.

What do you think of Mountain View’s current rent control laws? Should they be improved or scrapped?
I was the only city council member in 2016 who supported Measure V. I opined at the time that it covered mobile home residents, but the city council chose to appoint people to the Rental Housing Committee who were against rent control. They excluded mobile home residents. So the biggest fix is making sure mobile home residents are covered.

How do you think the city should handle the abundance of vehicle dwellers?
Since 2015, I’ve advocated sanctioned encampment for safe parking at the Shoreline Amphitheatre parking lot, but we don’t have enough spaces. There are too many restrictions and not enough services. We not only have to provide a place for people, but also for services. I oppose any effort to outlaw vehicle residents on our streets citywide, until we have a place for people to go.

Are you concerned about gentrification, that new tech workers are displacing longtime residents? How should this issue be addressed?
Mountain View is suffering from a crisis of gentrification. The data shows that we’re still losing a lot of our Latinx residents. We value these people in our community. The biggest thing we can do is build more housing with a requirement of 15-20% inclusionary, below-market housing. In Silicon Valley we have the greatest concentration of wealth in human history, but people with jobs are living in vehicles. The way we tax should focus on wealth and income.

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