Letters to the Editor, city manager criticism

  There are three additional letters published here that did not make the Town Crier's Sept. 25 print edition due to space constraints.

 

Is Mordo promoting anarchy or autocracy?

In his letter published in the Town Crier, Jean Mordo asserts that since city council members are “amateurs,” their subordinates (“professionals”) are entitled to ignore them (“Former LA mayor defends city manager,” Sept. 11).

Having 100% agreement between manager and subordinate is unnecessary and, in fact, is undesirable. However, refusing to do what he is ultimately ordered to do is called insubordination – a recipe for anarchy and worse.


Other Voices: Our students'; academic performance is terrific

There seems to be a perception that Bullis Charter School offers an elite academic education that is not available in the Los Altos School District. Data from the California Board of Education indicates that district students and Bullis Charter School students are achieving comparable academic scores.

This is great news for our students, a terrific accomplishment by their teachers and a tribute to the continuous care provided by their parents.

Letters to the Editor

There’s a lack of cars, not parking spaces

Thank you for writing about the crazy parking fixation (“Downtown needs to get over parking fixation,” Aug. 7). For the longest time, I have been wondering what on earth the issue about parking could be.

I have lived in Los Altos for 23 years, and in all my time as a resident I have never observed overcrowding in parking lots downtown. I can find parking easily, except of course when there is an event downtown.

Letters to the Editor – Week of Sept. 18

Prop. 13 value cap protects all homeowners

In response to Victoria Byrd’s letter to the Town Crier (“Nix parcel tax and phase out value cap,” Aug 28):

California Proposition 13 was passed by the voters in 1978. The most important part of Proposition 13 is the value cap that limits the amount of increase levied on real property each year. That value cap was passed by voters because thousands of elderly homeowners were being forced out of their homes due to ever-increasing property tax assessments.

Healthier air for all

Los Altos is a beautiful, peaceful town. However, the air quality, peace and beauty are disturbed by gas-powered leaf blowers. You may not know that gas-powered blowers are illegal in Los Altos. In fact, Los Altos was the first community in the Bay Area to ban gas leaf blowers back in 1991 (Los Altos Municipal Code 6.16.070 – Prohibited acts Section B.15).

They create lots of polluting emissions. Running a gas-powered blower for 30 minutes creates more ozone-forming emissions than driving an F-150 pickup truck 3,800 miles, according to the online automotive information resource Edmunds.com. The small engines in gas-powered blowers are very inefficient due to incomplete fuel burning, thus they produce high amounts of carbon monoxide, ozone and other polluting gases compared with motor vehicles. They are unhealthy for you, your gardeners and the entire community.

Other Voices: LASD invites residents to be part of Community Engagement Process

The Los Altos School District and the Community Engagement Process Project Team invite the community to participate in the Community Engagement Process to formulate a long-term facility plan to house Bullis Charter School and ensure a top-quality education for all children.

Other Voices : Group exploring 'unintended consequences' of LASD-BCS facilities use

Our community is currently engaged in a historic discussion about the future of our schools. Back in 2014, the voters of the Los Altos School District approved a $150 million bond measure to build a 10th school site and upgrade existing school facilities. This past school year, many of us were shocked and angered when the district seriously considered a plan to relocate our longtime neighborhood school, Egan Junior High School, to a new site on the other side of El Camino Real to give use of the entire campus (less 2 acres for much-needed affordable teacher housing) to Bullis Charter School.

Many of us were relieved when the district board of trustees, after listening to the concerns of many district residents, tabled the proposal for further study. However, the issues of where and how to house Bullis Charter School, what happens to our neighborhood public schools and how the $150 million bond measure will ultimately be spent still loom large.


Submit a Letter to the Editor

The Town Crier welcomes letters to the editor on current events pertinent to Los Altos, Los Altos Hills and Mountain View. Write to us at 138 Main St., Los Altos 94022, Attn: Editor, or email editor Bruce Barton at bruceb@latc.com. Because editorial space is limited, please confine letters to no more than 200 words. Include a phone number for verification purposes. Anonymous letters will not be printed.

You can also have your say right here at losaltosonline.com – scroll to the bottom of any story to add a comment. 

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