10202017Fri
Last updateWed, 18 Oct 2017 10am

County assessment roll reaches $450 billion

Santa Clara Santa Clara County Assessor Larry Stone reported that the annual assessment roll reached $450 billion, a 7.37 percent increase over the previous year.

The assessment roll reflects the total net assessed value of all real and business property in the county as of Jan. 1.

Peruri's VoterCircle aims to educate politicians & voters


Town Crier File Photo
Sangeeth Peruri, second from right, began developing his VoterCircle campaign management app during his successful run for Los Altos School District Board of Trustees.

Sangeeth Peruri may have been a bit of a dark-horse candidate for the Los Altos School District Board of Trustees in 2014, but he had two secret weapons: a mind-set focused on efficiency and a campaign team willing to get creative.

“I found the process really inefficient,” Peruri said of winning his seat. “We were spending a lot of time phone-banking for Measure N … and people don’t respond from a volunteer they’ve never met. There had to be a better way.”

Realtors' Charitable Foundation awards scholarships to teens


Courtesy of Silicon Valley Association of Realtors
Denise Welsh, left, president of the Silicon Valley Association of Realtors, presents the SILVAR Charitable Foundation scholarship to Los Altos High graduating senior Simge Yildiz.

The Silicon Valley Realtors Charitable Foundation, the charitable arm of the Silicon Valley Association of Realtors, recently presented $1,000 scholarships to 18 graduating high school seniors.

Now in its 18th year, the realtor scholars program recognizes students whose achievements encompass academics, extracurricular/employment activities and community involvement. The selection committee included representatives from the local business community, area high schools, area colleges and SILVAR.

Brand-name retailers won't risk Los Altos, brokers claim


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Chico’s, the women’s clothing store on Main Street, is the exception to the rule of no big-brand shops in Los Altos. Some local residents want additional national retailers downtown, but brokers say that more people and new buildings are needed first.

Even if many Los Altos residents want to be closer to their favorite stores, that does not necessarily mean those retailers want to be closer to them.

According to two local real estate brokers, big-name retailers find Los Altos too risky an investment because of its somnolent downtown.

Which is better: No advice or bad advice?

By Artie Green

Service employees struggle to hang onto jobs in Los Altos


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Jael Ruiz takes an order behind the counter at the American Italian Delicatessen on Main Street. Ruiz, who has worked in Los Altos for more than a decade, said she enjoys the city’s family atmosphere, but her commute from Campbell – up to two hours a day – takes a toll on her family.

After nearly 17 years working at restaurants in downtown Los Altos, Jael Ruiz has long wrangled with the housing and transportation challenges that define the lives of workers throughout the region.

An employee at the American Italian Delicatessen on Main Street, Ruiz said she enjoys her work assembling sandwiches and prizes the relationships she has formed with co-workers and customers. However, her job comes with constant uncertainty.


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