Fri10242014

Letters to the Editor

Don’t point fingers at LAH residents

I am responding to the Town Crier’s front-page article “Despite drought, LAH still swimming with pools” (Feb. 12).

I am not quite sure what to make of this article. Am I supposed to be upset that those selfish Los Altos Hills residents don’t realize that there is a drought and still have the audacity to want to fill their pools with water (which they, of course, will have to pay for)?

Am I to be upset with the Los Altos Hills administration or Purissima Hills Water District for not rejecting the permits to fill these pools (all five of them) or even force those rich and irresponsible people that currently own a pool to drain them?

This is just another jab by the current liberal/progressive culture in the Bay Area and elsewhere that wants to create a class warfare situation against the famous “1 percent.” What is it about being successful and living the American dream that is so distasteful to these people?

Never mind that more water is wasted by the cities every year cleaning out the water mains, that water is wasted by careless landscaping by the cities and businesses, that more water is wasted by tourists in the local hotels than you can ever save with your low-flow toilets, storing water in buckets or not watering your lawn. Let’s just find a scapegoat and put more regulations on anything that smacks of individual freedom and initiative.

P.S.: I don’t have a swimming pool.

William F. Moniz Los Altos

Western doctors could learn from Chinese

The Town Crier recently ran a column by a doctor arguing that more doctors should listen to their patients because patients will tell them what they need to know for a good diagnosis (“Why you should talk to your doctor – and why doctors should listen,” Jan. 22). I wonder.

When I worked in the library, librarians generally agreed that patrons who approached the reference desk with a question seldom asked what they really wanted to know. I suspect patients may not be any more astute in talking to the doctor.

In any case, this brings up an important point: Can a patient provide the doctor with all the information he or she needs to make a diagnosis, right there, at the visit? Chinese doctors do this. By assessing appearance, tongue, pulse and by listening to the patient’s complaints, a Chinese doctor comes to a diagnosis and recommends a remedy. Western doctors almost never do this. Western doctors should be trained both in listening and looking.

Martha Dahlen

San Jose

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