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Domenico joins five returning wineries at this year’s festival


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Representatives from six wineries are slated to pour their wines at this year’s festival. Five of them are returnees; Domenico Winery is new.

Known for hosting boutique wineries, the annual Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival attracts wine aficionados from throughout the Bay Area.

As in past years, the festival features selections from six Bay Area wineries. Five of them are returnees - Fernwood Cellars, Naumann Vineyards, Page Mill Winery, Thomas Fogarty Winery and Vineyards, and Martin Ranch Winery - along with newcomer Domenico Winery.

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Take a ride or go down the slide in festival's Family Fun Zone


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The climbing rock in the Family Fun Zone, above, proved to be a big hit at last year’s Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival. This year’s event features several amusements for children, highlighted by the Super Slide.

While the adults often favor walking the aisles viewing the art and sipping wine, the kids attending the Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival always enjoy the Family Fun Zone the most. It’s a place where they can go on a ride, hurl down a giant slide or simply sit and be entertained.

Located directly off San Antonio Road and Third Street, the Family Fun Zone offers amusements for children of all ages.

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Grab a bite from a variety of vendors


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Barbecued foods are a staple at the festival, popular choices for lunch and dinner.

Strolling the streets looking at art and dancing to live music can work up an appetite, which can be satiated by the bevy of booths and restaurants serving food at this weekend’s Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival.

This year’s festival features offerings from more than two dozen food vendors and restaurants from the Bay Area and beyond. Most of them can be found in the food courts located on Second and Third streets between Main and State streets.

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Tips for enjoying this year’s festival


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Festival organizers encourage people to park their vehicles at Los Altos High School and ride the free shuttle buses to and from the downtown event. They request that attendees leave their pets at home.

Following are some quick tips to make the 35th annual Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival more enjoyable.

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Festival features fun for everyone


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The Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival boasts more than 375 craft and arts booths.

This weekend’s 35th annual Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival promises to be jam-packed with fun activities for just about everyone. The event aims to please art aficionados, oenophiles, foodies and children of all ages.

It began in 1979, when the Los Altos Village Association (LAVA) - a 501(c)(6) not-for-profit organization - created the festival to raise funds for events and programs that promote the downtown Los Altos business district.

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Silicon Valley culture with a generational twist: Startups in Los Altos launch later in life


CRATE As the Kiwi Crate staff expanded, the company grew up and out of Los Altos, where it began in founder Sandra Oh Lin’s garage.

When Sandra Oh Lin started a children’s craft business in her Los Altos garage in 2011, neighborhood children turned up as a first round of product testers. Her company, Kiwi Crate, has grown up and out of town, but its roots remain in investor relationships and on the product itself - four Los Altos children’s faces grin from the boxes now lining shelves at local Target stores.

A seldom-seen startup ecosystem buzzes behind the scenes in Los Altos, a longtime bedroom community for Silicon Valley. But innovation in the city of apricots has a distinct flavor, top-heavy with angel and venture investors and low on modernist offices loaded with startup perks.

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Threads of the past: Crafts make a comeback in Los Altos

Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier

Uncommon Threads knitting instructor Shellye McKinney winds a skein of yarn into a ball.

In the 1950s, you could graduate with a degree in home economics from UC Berkeley. Junior high and high school students, mostly girls, learned to sew, cook and design their own china patterns in class, while boys took woodworking and auto shop. Then came the barrier-breaking 1970s, when culinary arts replaced home economics and both genders felt free to explore an array of electives.

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