07012016Fri
Last updateWed, 29 Jun 2016 8am

How to hire an estate-sale company


COurtesy of Amanda Kuzak
If an estate-sale company sets realistic expectations when hosting a sale, the sellers will end up with smiles on their faces.

It’s time to say goodbye to Grandma’s knitted owl collection and somehow break down Grandpa’s garage - the tool benches, weird springs and connectors he always liked. The entire house is packed, and the realtor ordered you to have it empty by May 1. Anxious yet?

The spring real estate market is in full swing, and my phone is ringing off the hook as homeowners and realtors are under pressure to empty estates. When I discuss with families the management of their estates and the liquidation process, they all have one thing in common: feeling overwhelmed.


It’s 2016 – do you know where your town has been?


Stephanie Smith/Town Crier; Below Courtesy of Los Altos History Museum The Copeland Building at First and Main Streets, above, harks back to Los Altos’ early days. The aesthetic of downtown has changed a bit since the first building – Eschenbruecher Hardware, below – was erected in 1908.
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While much evidence of Los Altos’ early days is long gone or hidden, some hints of the past are still visible - in street names, buildings, old houses and even a remnant of an orchard here and there.

Charting Los Altos Hills’ evolution


Special to the Town Crier Views like that of San Francisco Bay from Byrne Preserve helped attract Silicon Valley’s elite to Los Altos Hills’ oft-lauded rural charm.

Jan. 27 marked the 60th anniversary of Los Altos Hills’ incorporation as a town. City officials celebrated the landmark with a gala event and publication of a town anthology, available as an e-book online at bit.ly/1KR0Mu8. Longtime residents Jitze and Nancy Couperus offer their firsthand accounts of the changes the town has undergone through the years.

When Los Altos Hills was born as a town, it was still heavily agricultural, still untouched by the suburban growth that flanked El Camino Real. There was no Interstate 280, and beyond the border of Palo Alto, Page Mill Road was little more than a shady two-lane road meandering alongside a creek toward the coastal hills. El Monte and Magdalena were similarly insignificant roads leading to orchard farms or grazing land.

Preserving Los Altos Hills’ equine history


A lesson at Westwind Community Barn, a preserved jewel of Los Altos Hills’ past.

Jan. 27 marked the 60th anniversary of Los Altos Hills’ incorporation as a town. City officials celebrated the landmark with a gala event and publication of a town anthology, available as an e-book online at bit.ly/1KR0Mu8. Longtime residents Jitze and Nancy Couperus offer their firsthand accounts of the changes the town has undergone through the years.

When Los Altos Hills became a town 60 years ago, the area was just starting to transition from an agricultural base to residential. As such, horses still played an integral part in the daily lives of residents and served a significant role in shaping the newly incorporated town and its culture.

Ready, set … pet? Is your family prepared for an animal friend?


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Yadira Hernandez and her children get acquainted with Sadie, a 3-year-old miniature poodle, at the Peninsula Humane Society in Burlingame.

Your family may be eager for a four-legged furry friend who greets you at the door - wagging or purring - or perhaps a bird to bring a cheerful song to your abode.

Raising dough on a rainy day


Christine Moore/Special to the Town Crier
When it’s wet and/or cold outside, making pizza can be a great indoor activity for kids. Adult supervision is advised.

The rain seems particularly self-assured on this day. Falling boldly and bouncing up from the ground with enthusiasm, the audible beat provides a rhythm to the day that seems to declare: Make pizza!

Happy families

Author Leo Tolstoy’s famous words from "Anna Karenina" - "Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way" - often comes to mind, because I think about families a lot.


SpecialtyMagazines advertise

Home & Garden

The Town Crier publishes six different glossy magazines throughout the year that are inserted into the newspaper.

You can view the latest magazine as a PDF here or explore our archive of past issues. 

 

Our magazines include:

  • Camps (1/27)
  • Family Spotlight (2/24)
  • Living in Los Altos (3/30 & 9/28)
  • Home & Garden (4/27 & 8/31)
  • Senior Lifestyles (5/25)
  • Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival Magazine (7/13)
  • Mountain View Art & Wine Festival Magazine (9/7)
  • Home for the Holidays (11/16)

To advertise, contact our sales department by calling (650) 948-9000 or email sales@latc.com.

To offer submissions to editorial, contact editor Bruce Barton at bruceb@latc.com.

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