Fuzzy vision deserves a no vote on Measure A: Other Voices

The vote for a community center (Measure A) is coming up, and there is only a general vision offered to motivate Los Altans to fund $65 million for a new community center.

The specific design and financial details associated with a genuine, complete plan are absent. We have no idea of what the overall project costs will be, such as total build cost, operating and staffing cost, and utilization assumptions. There are also other phases of the overall Civic Center revitalization, of which this is just a part, which in the long run may substantially add to the total.


Yes to seniors, yes to families and yes on Measure A

We have the opportunity to do something truly wonderful for Los Altos: Build a new Community Center and swim center to serve our entire community. You can help make this happen by voting yes on Measure A on Nov. 3.

When I ran for city council in November 2012, a complete redevelopment of the entire 18-acre civic center site had been proposed (the 2009 master plan). This never came to a vote because the community, including me, did not support such an extensive plan. It didn’t benefit the community; rather, it called for replacing city hall and the police department first, and taking care of the residents in later phases.


In support of Measure A

There has been some negative press on Measure A, the bond measure on the Nov. 3 ballot that would replace the decrepit Hillview Community Center with a modern facility and swim complex.

Everyone who criticizes it starts by admitting that a new facility is desirable, but that it is either too big, too expensive, as yet too undefined, in the wrong place or not in sync with our real needs.


Letters to the Editor

Measure A needs a business plan

Los Altos Measure A proponents claim its aquatic center will be self-funding with no supporting details.

Pools are expensive. No private investor would fund a multimillion-dollar project without a rigorous business plan. Public investment requires similar scrutiny.


Letters to the Editor

Pools supporters refute opposing argument

We would like to set the record straight in response to the misinformation that appeared in Bill and Maria Lonergan’s letter to the editor (“Civic center project needs new EIR,” Sept. 9). We would like to address two specific issues.

First, the question of the community desire for a pool: The letter refers to the 2012 Godbe Survey but makes no mention of the most recent Godbe Survey presented to the Los Altos City Council June 9. In the Godbe telephone survey of likely voters, conducted between July 25 and Aug. 5, 2014, the proposed bond to replace the Hillview Center showed 60.4 percent support for the pool.


Playing the Trump card: No Shoes, Please

I’ve given a lot of thought to Donald Trump over the past several months, though I didn’t really want to. I was never a fan, but my opinion of him plummeted in 2012 during his birther tirades over President Barack Obama’s citizenship. He isn’t the only person in the U.S. who believes our president to be foreign-born; however, he was the only one who claimed to have sent an investigative team to Hawaii to prove it. After failing to produce evidence of the alleged birthplace conspiracy (and it’s not clear that he actually sent anyone to Hawaii in the first place), he switched gears and began shouting for documentation of the president’s matriculation at both Columbia and Harvard.

Eventually, Trump’s hysteria over an undereducated, Kenyan-born Muslim occupying the White House quieted down when he needed to report for duty for season whatever of “The Apprentice.” But Trump is back – running for president and sputtering inanities all over again – and he’s more popular than ever. He’s not only the frontrunner for the Republican presidential nomination, his every word is covered by all of the major news outlets, and he seems to be impacting the tenor and substance of his fellow nominees’ talking points as well.


Editorial: A dedicated senior center makes sense

There are many sound arguments in favor of dedicated space for a senior center as part of the proposed Hillview Community Center and Park renovation. There are few sound arguments against – that we’ve heard, anyway. Therefore, the city should collectively get behind its Senior Commission and support a dedicated space.

As it stands, the city proposes constructing a 55,000-square-foot “multigenerational” facility, with the idea that the details for its use would be figured out after (and if) the $65 million bond measure needed for the overhaul passes on the Nov. 3 ballot.


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