Sun05012016

News

Loyola Corners economics, traffic rise to top of planning concerns

Loyola Corners economics, traffic rise to top of planning concerns

Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Loyola Bridge construction parallel to the Fremont Avenue frontage may lead officials to alter circulation plans for the area.

Loyola Corners stakeholders last week mulled the issues that will likely shape the area&rsquo...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

LAHS Green Team commemorates Earth Week

LAHS Green Team commemorates Earth Week


Traci Newell/Town Crier
Los Altos High School Green Team members, above, quiz their classmates about water conservation. The club distributed plants as prizes during the club’s Earth Week activities.

Members of the Los Altos High School Green...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

Local pianist, 11, slated to perform Saturday at statewide competition

Local pianist, 11, slated to perform Saturday at statewide competition


Courtesy of the Cha family
Spencer Cha plays piano at a Santa Clara University recital. The sixth-grader also enjoys soccer, tennis, golf and skiing.

Spencer Cha has come a long way since he first sat down at the piano at age 2.

“I remem...

Read more:

Loading...

Sports

Spartans net second place, eye top prize next season

Spartans net second place, eye top prize next season


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Jeremy Hsu, Mountain View High’s top singles player, competes against Pinewood Thursday. The Spartans won the match 7-0.

With freshmen playing the top three spots in singles, the future of the Mountain View High boy...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

Los Altos at a leadership crossroads: Editorial

Don’t look now, but there could be some major changes ahead regarding how the Los Altos city government is run.

The current city council has the opportunity to hire a new city manager in the wake of Marcia Somers’ recent resignation. Fur...

Read more:

Loading...

Special Sections

How to personalize the wedding bar

How to personalize the wedding bar


Christine Moore/Special to the Town Crier
A seasonal signature cocktail adds interest beyond the standard wedding bar’s spirits and mixers. Focus on one set of fresh ingredients, such as blueberries, blackberries and mint for a dose of budget...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

Farmers prepare to market season's bounty

Farmers prepare to market season's bounty


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Journeyman farmer Jen Friedlander waters Hidden Villa’s greenhouse plants, which will grow stronger in the controlled indoor environment before being transferred to the field outdoors.

Around Hidden Villa, the gree...

Read more:

Loading...

People

BUOL JOANNE DOUGHERTY

BUOL JOANNE DOUGHERTY

1930-2016

Heaven gained a beautiful angel today. Our beloved mother’s blessed life ended in her Los Altos home surrounded by her loving family on April 18, 2016.

Buol Joanne Dougherty was born Sept. 28, 1930 in Chicago. At the age of two, M...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

'Catch' comes to conclusion LA Stage Co. comedy  ends run this weekend

'Catch' comes to conclusion LA Stage Co. comedy ends run this weekend


Richard Mayer/Special to the Town Crier
Bryan Moriarty, left, stars as Yossarian and John Stephen King plays the Psychiatrist in Los Altos Stage Company’s “Catch-22.”

Los Altos Stage Company’s presentation of “Catch...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

Hidden in plain sight: Rotary speaker warns of dangers of human trafficking


Steve Pomeroy/ Rotary Club of Los Altos
Betty Ann Boeving addresses the Los Altos Rotary Club Jan. 16.

Betty Ann Boeving, founder and executive director of the Bay Area Anti-Trafficking Coalition, warned members of the Rotary Club of Los Altos Jan. 16 that human trafficking has grown into a $32 billion industry that plagues not only distant developing countries, but also the Bay Area.

“Human trafficking in the Bay Area is hidden in plain sight here in Los Altos, Mountain View, Los Gatos and beyond,” she said, defining it as “modern-day slavery.”

Boeving estimated that 50 percent of human trafficking victims are children and 80 percent are female, totaling 23 million victims worldwide.

In Silicon Valley, she noted, victims may be forced into domestic servitude as nannies or maids, child labor in restaurants or sex trafficking in nail salons and massage parlors.

Human traffickers may attempt to hide suspicious activity by using a legitimate business as a front, such as a massage parlor, she said.

Impact close to home

The perpetrators of human trafficking may appear innocent, Boeving cautioned. One nicely maintained Silicon Valley house, for example, aroused suspicion when a neighbor noticed that there were bars inside, not outside, the windows. Even in Los Altos, Boeving added, the parents of a high school student sold their daughter for sex. The girl, who escaped only after going away to college, has since appeared as a speaker at the Freedom Summit human trafficking conference.

Victims may include domestic workers, young people selling fruit on corners and children selling magazine subscriptions door-to-door, Boeving said. In a Menlo Park case, the police caught traffickers dropping off a young girl at a church after the service to beg among parishioners.

Some violent video games, like Grand Theft Auto, may desensitize children to violence against women, prompting Boeving to suggest that parents be alert to attitudes forming within their families.

Californians approved Proposition 35, the ban on human trafficking and sex slavery, by an 81 percent margin in 2012, the largest initiative victory in state history. A concerted effort by individuals, communities and nonprofit groups is needed to defeat human trafficking, Boeving said.

San Jose International Airport personnel have been trained to recognize human trafficking by people posing as sports coaches, field trip leaders or even aunts and uncles. Other personnel with heightened awareness should include school staff, medical first responders and local legislators.

Boeving recommended that corporations investigate their supply chains for labor violations in source countries. In their own homes, consumers may unknowingly support human trafficking via their product purchases and should check to ensure that companies with slave-free supply chains market the products they buy.

Boeving noted that coffee, chocolate, tea, rice, sugar and hygiene products like shampoo should display the Fair Trade Certified logo that guarantees slave-free production.

Boeving said coordinated effort by individuals, communities and nonprofit groups could eliminate human trafficking within one generation.

“We are all needed to send the message to traffickers that they will be stopped – the Bay Area is a place where they can’t do business,” she said.

For more information, visit baatc.org.

Marlene Cowan is a member of the Rotary Club of Los Altos.

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos