Wed05062015

News

LASD, city move toward land discussions

The ice may be thawing a bit as the Los Altos School District and the city of Los Altos consider resurrecting discussions on the potential use of public land as a school site.

The city voted to discontinue conversations about civic land with the sch...

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Schools

Mental health expert dispels myths

Mental health expert dispels myths


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Palo Alto University Professor Paul Marcille addresses a crowd of psychology students and mental health activists last week about myths surrounding mental illness and violence.

In the wake of the 2011 Sandy Hook Elementa...

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Community

Q&A: Meet the city's new public works and administrative services directors

The city of Los Altos has hired three new department directors in the past ten months. The Town Crier recently profiled new Recreation Director Manny Hernandez. This week, the Town Crier profiles Susana Chan, new public works director, and Kim Juran-...

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Comment

Familiar icon pops up in Los Altos: A Piece of My Mind

I was walking to my car parked on State Street when my eye fell on an old familiar acquaintance from my early childhood, totally unexpected to meet in Los Altos. It was the “Steinway” logo over the door of the new Steinway Piano Gallery,...

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Special Sections

New Los Altos shop brews milk tea for gourmands

New Los Altos shop brews milk tea for gourmands


Eliza Ridgeway/Town Crier
Teaspoon, the milk tea shop at Village Court in Los Altos, above, serves a range of bubble teas and snow ice drinks, right.

Los Altos made it onto the milk tea map this spring with the opening of Teaspoon, a new bubble tea ...

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Business

Ed center scores spot in Foothills Crossing

Ed center scores spot in Foothills Crossing


Alicia Castro/ Town Crier
C2 Los Altos tutor Max Shih, left, instructs Homestead High School student Rajesh Suresh.

Los Altos families have a new resource for helping their children ace the test.

C2 Los Altos – a recently opened education cente...

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Books

People

DOROTHY RUTH MATHIS PUDER

DOROTHY RUTH MATHIS PUDER

9/17/1918-4/15/2015

Dorothy Puder died on April 15th in Sunnyvale, California. She will be remembered for her gentle, loving, positive and caring ways and will be greatly missed by family and friends.

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Travel

Cuba libre: Local residents join mad rush of travelers

Cuba libre: Local residents join mad rush of travelers


Natalie Elefant/Special to the Town Crier
Los Altos resident Natalie Elefant noted the vibrant street performances as a traveler in Cuba.

The U.S. restored diplomatic relations with Cuba late last year, enabling Americans to import $100 worth of cig...

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Stepping Out

 PYT's comedic musical opens this weekend in Mtn. View

PYT's comedic musical opens this weekend in Mtn. View


Lyn Flaim/Spotlight Moments Photography
The cast of Peninsula Youth Theatre’s “Once Upon a Mattress” includes, from left, Sophia Graziani (of Los Altos) as Winnifred, Chris Gough (Sunnyvale) as the Prince and Reilly Arena (Palo Alto) as the Queen. ...

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Spiritual Life

Mercifully in His grip: Exploring our true position in Christ

I recently read a wonderful analogy about our true position in Christ. It was shockingly contrary to the messages impressed upon me in church, but deeply rooted in the Bible. The analogy is that of child and a parent. If you have ever taken a small ...

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Magazine

Practice prudent pruning: Maintaining manzanita, ceanothus and toyon

Practice prudent pruning: Maintaining manzanita, ceanothus and toyon


tanya kucak/Special to the Town Crier
Shrub manzanitas are known for their sinuous mahogany trunks and branches. If the foliage hides the bark, prune selectively to open the center so that the bark is visible year-round. This Montara manzanita is ...

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Inside Mountain View

Up to the challenge: Local leaders unite to help at-risk youth

Up to the challenge: Local leaders unite to help at-risk youth


Courtesy of Challenge Team
Jeanette Freiberg, bottom of pile, has fun with family members. The Challenge Team named Freiberg, a student at Mountain View High School, its 2015 Youth Champion.

There’s an ongoing joke among members of the Challenge...

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Why you should talk to your doctor and why doctor should listen


courtesy of University of Pennsylvania archives
Dr. William Osler, co-founder of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, advocated a strong doctor-patient relationship.

“The good physician treats the disease; the great physician treats the patient with the disease.”

This quote is from the renowned physician and teacher Sir William Osler, co-founder of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, who lived and practiced from the mid-19th to the early 20th century. During his time, antibiotics were unknown, surgery was still an extremely dangerous proposition and public health measures such as hand washing and the importance of a clean water supply were just beginning to take hold. The wide array of diagnostic methods and treatments we take for granted today were mostly nonexistent.

Yet Osler understood and taught that a strong doctor-patient relationship – whether achieved within minutes or over a period of years – was crucial to diagnosing and treating illness. He knew that it was in fact the cornerstone of outstanding medical care.

“Listen to your patients,” he advised. “They are telling you the diagnosis.”

In today’s high-tech medical world, with its ever-expanding litany of blood tests and imaging studies (not to mention countless medications), it’s easy to lose sight of the fact that a doctor’s most powerful tool remains listening to patients. This becomes particularly challenging in a seemingly always-rushed environment, where time is in short supply and the tendency is often to keep things moving in assembly line fashion.

Yet as physicians, we still rely on our patients to tell us their stories. Given the chance, patients often paint a picture to guide their doctors toward the proper diagnosis and treatment. Having patients feel comfortable enough to do this is a precious trust that doctors cannot take for granted.

Part of every medical school and residency curriculum today includes instruction on patient-interviewing skills and a newer focus on developing and maintaining a strong patient-provider relationship. Many health-care organizations, such as the Palo Alto Medical Foundation, also conduct formal training and observation programs to promote solid and enduring patient-provider bonds. No blood test or expensive piece of diagnostic machinery will ever replace this relationship as the engine that drives exceptional medical care.

This is why I believe that having a primary-care doctor is so important to your overall health. Knowing and trusting your provider makes it easier for you to give us a deeper, more comprehensive picture of who you are. It also allows us to better reflect this in your chart for when you need to see other providers.

Our job in treating you, the patient – either preventively or for a specific illness or injury – requires that we know you as a human being. And no two human beings are completely alike, even if they suffer from the same disease or disorder.

Osler, the grand old father of modern medicine, understood this better than most. His words to his fellow physicians about not forgetting such a basic tenet still ring true today, nearly 100 years after his death: “Every patient you see is a lesson in much more than the malady from which he suffers.”

Dr. Robert Russo is an internal medicine physician at the Redwood City Center of the Palo Alto Medical Foundation.

The Palo Alto Medical Foundation and column editor Arian Dasmalchi provide this monthly column.

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