Fri01302015

News

Foothill to offer four-year degree: Foothill aims to launch dental hygiene degree in fall 2016

Foothill to offer four-year degree: Foothill aims to launch dental hygiene degree in fall 2016


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Students enrolled in Foothill College’s two-year dental hygiene program, above, can soon earn a four-year bachelor’s degree for approximately $10,000.

Foothill-De Anza Community College District Chancellor Linda M. Th...

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Schools

Freestyle hosts exhibition at Computer Science Museum

Freestyle hosts exhibition at Computer Science Museum


Traci Newell/Town Crier
Mountain View High junior and Freestyle Academy student Radika Gupta, right, works with a fellow student during a WebAudio course this month.

For three periods a day, a small subset of students from Los Altos and Mountain Vi...

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Community

Museum explores Stanford, Valley connection

Museum explores Stanford, Valley connection


Courtesy of Julie Rose
The Los Altos History Museum’s “Symbiotic Superstars” event drew a crowd including, from left, “The Lure & the Legends” creator Nan Geschke, Stanford President John L. Hennessy, historian Leslie Berlin and Adobe Systems c...

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Comment

Good compromise on PE exemptions: Editorial

While “Deflategate” captures the national sports headlines, the local issue of physical education class exemptions for freshmen seems a much worthier sports topic for discussion.

The Mountain View Los Altos Union High School District Board of Truste...

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Special Sections

Your Home Brief

Filoli hosts bird exhibition

Filoli kicks off the 2015 season of art exhibitions in its Visitor and Education Center with “The Birds of America: Audubon Collection,” a selection of prints from Filoli’s Permanent Collection, Feb. 10...

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Business

Wine & beer lounge coming to First Street

Wine & beer lounge coming to First Street


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
The new wine and beer lounge Honcho heads to First Street, with a spring opening anticipated.

A cocktail lounge proposed for First Street has cleared its first hurdle – the Los Altos Planning and Transportation Comm...

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Books

"Fearless Genius" photos chart Silicon Valleys brain trust


Not every book needs pages and pages of words to tell a story – some do it through pictures.

“Fearless Genius: The Digital Revolution in Silicon Valley, 1985-2000” (Atria Books, 2014) by Doug Menuez features more than 100 photographs Menuez to...

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People

RUBY DOSHIM LAI

Ruby Doshim Lai was born on July 26, 1929 and passed away at home on January 10, 2015. A resident of Los Altos for over 50 years, Ruby is survived by her husband Bill; children Gwen, Tracy and Allyn; and grandchildren Kiyoshi and Misa.

Born on Mott ...

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Travel

Cuban photographer slated to appear at Foothill

Cuban photographer slated to appear at Foothill


Courtesy of Raúl Cañibano
Cuban photographer Raúl Cañibano is set to appear at Foothill College tonight. His work – including the image “Series: Guajira’s Land, Viñales, 2007,” right – is on display at the KCI Gallery t...

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Stepping Out

'Betrayal' at Pear

'Betrayal' at Pear


Ray Renati/Special to the Town Crier
The cast of Pear Avenue Theatre’s “Betrayal” includes Maryssa Wanlass, from left, Fred Pitts and William J. Brown III.

The Pear Avenue Theatre presents Harold Pinter’s investigation of modern relationships, “...

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Magazine

Tracing history on foot: Hidden Villa’s long hike

Tracing history on foot: Hidden Villa’s long hike


Campers on Hidden Villa’s Sierra Backpacking Trip study historical photos to measure how the land has changed and alternate serving as student leaders who guide the route of their three-week trek.

Amid the high-tech camps and programs of a Bay Area ...

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Healing the heel: Treating plantar fasciitis


courtesy of Ted Ray
The red area in the illustration shows an inflamed ligament in the heel, known as plantar fasciitis.

Plantar fasciitis is the term used to describe foot pain that occurs in the heel or the arch of the foot. Typically brought on by overuse, such as running or walking long distances, plantar fasciitis can be difficult to treat because the inflammation is in the fascia, or ligamentous tissue, on the bottom of the foot.

Typical approaches to treatment include cortisone shots to reduce inflammation, orthotics to support the foot and protective boots worn at night to prevent the foot from contracting. But no one treatment works for everyone.

So what can you do if arch and heel pain affect you? I spoke with Dr. Lawrence Oloff of SOAR Medical Group, the team podiatrist for the San Francisco Giants, to get his perspective on the best way to resolve the condition.

Q: What is plantar fasciitis?

A: The plantar fascia is a ligament in the arch that attaches to the heel and runs the length of the foot. Fasciitis represents a condition where the plantar fascia gets inflamed and irritated, resulting in heel pain in the bottom of the foot.

Q: Who gets plantar fasciitis?

A: It is more common in active people but can be witnessed in anyone. It is more common with foot structural issues such as high arch feet and flat feet. Walkers, runners and hikers are particularly prone to it. As running is a major part of conditioning for many sports, it is witnessed as one of the most common sports overuse injuries.

Q: How do I know if I have plantar fasciitis?

A: Fasciitis symptoms are expressed as heel pain on the bottom of the foot that is exacerbated by standing and walking. People express their worst pain when first getting out of bed, out of a chair or when exiting a car.

Q: How do you treat plantar fasciitis in your office?

A: The first line of treatment involves simultaneous approaches such as temporary use of anti-inflammatory medicines (if medically allowed) like Advil or Aleve, over-the-counter orthotics or padded heel cups, icing, stretching (arches, calves and hamstrings), night splints (check out nightsplints.com) and elimination of irritating weight-bearing activities.

Q: How long does plantar fasciitis last?

A: Be patient, because it can take months to totally improve.

Q: Any quick fixes?

A: Check out your shoes and make sure that they are supportive enough, or maybe it’s just time to replace that worn-out running shoe.

Q: What if it doesn’t get better?

A: Options for stronger treatment include prescription-strength anti-inflammatory medications, limited use of cortisone injections or custom orthotics. Stress fractures of the heel bone are not that uncommon. They typically present with pain on the sides of the heel versus the bottom. An X-ray, and maybe an MRI, is needed for a more precise diagnosis.

Acupuncture for plantar fasciitis

While needles in the foot may seem counterintuitive for this kind of pain, acupuncture can be really effective in releasing foot tension. That’s because acupuncture works to increase circulation to certain parts of the body and can release acute muscle spasm.

One acupuncture point in particular has been especially effective in treating plantar fasciitis. Master Tung, among the most famous acupuncturists in modern times, used a point halfway up the inside of the upper thigh to treat heel pain. This point releases tension in the Achilles tendon, thereby taking tension off the bottom of the foot.

Whether you start with massage, physical therapy or a new pair of shoes, many approaches to treating plantar fasciitis will work. The trick is to find the therapy – or therapies – that work for you. A podiatrist, physical therapist or acupuncturist is a good place to start.

Ted Ray is a licensed acupuncturist and herbalist in private practice in Mountain View. For more information, call 564-9002 or visit peninsulaacupuncture.com.

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