Sat02282015

News

North Bayshore proposals due today

The City of Mountain View is receiving North Bayshore development proposals today. Applications may be made until the deadline at 5 p.m.

All submissions will be available for viewing March 2 at the Community Development Department counter in City Ha...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

Former NFL player huddles with Blach students about life choices

Former NFL player huddles with Blach students about life choices


Ellie Van HOutte/Town Crier
Former NFL tight end Eason Ramson visited with Blach Intermediate School students, Feb. 13 to share the perils of drug use. Now a motivational speaker, Ramson works with at-risk teens in San Francisco.

Although former ...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

Chi Am Circle, Chef Chu's prove 'golden': Club sets fundraising goal of $200K for March fashion show

Chi Am Circle, Chef Chu's prove 'golden': Club sets fundraising goal of $200K for March fashion show


Courtesy of Bev Harada
Chi Am Circle members, from left, Gerrye Wong, Sylvia Eng, Pearl Lee and Muriel Kao flank Larry Chu Sr. at the Jan. 31 event honoring the club’s 50th and Chef Chu’s 45th anniversaries.

Chef Chu’s restaurant in Los Altos ho...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

Freedom's just another word: No Shoes, Please

It used to be that the word “freedom” held exclusively positive connotations for me, but now it’s really become a mixed bag. It all started in 2001 when President George W. Bush asked the question he felt was on the minds of most Americans regarding ...

Read more:

Loading...

Special Sections

Filoli in bloom: Historic estate hosts  classes, events and tours

Filoli in bloom: Historic estate hosts classes, events and tours


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Scenes from Filoli: The historic estate in Woodside is a welcoming sanctuary for visitors. The grounds offer a rotating display of seasonal flowers, a tranquil reflecting pool and paths that wend through the 16-acre Engl...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

Stock volatility still confusing

The market opened down more than 100 points Friday but by noon rose more than 130, the form of volatility that quickly draws investors’ attention. By week’s end, the Standard & Poor’s 500 index and the Dow Jones industrial aver...

Read more:

Loading...

Books

French novel

French novel "Hunting and Gathering" offers character-driven suspense


Anna Gavalda is a well-known author in her native France, where she has published six books, most of which have met with considerable praise and commercial success. Her fourth novel, “Hunting and Gathering” (Riverhead Books, 2007), is filled ...

Read more:

Loading...

People

CHRIS A. KENISON

CHRIS A. KENISON

Feb 13, 1945-Feb 6, 2015

Resident of Los Altos

Chris was born in Georgia and moved to Oklahoma as a young child. He grew up there and moved to California in 1965. He developed a strong work ethic from his grandparents and parents. He attended the...

Read more:

Loading...

Travel

Seoul of the city: Korean capital offers mix of old and new

Seoul of the city: Korean capital offers mix of old and new


Ramya Krishna/Special to the Town Crier
Seoul’s Cheonggyecheon public recreation space, above, features an elevated pedestrian bridge.

Seoul, South Korea, is a study in contrasts. Having grown quickly, the city is a mix of old and new.

Using...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

'Park' in the hills

'Park' in the hills


courtesy of Foothill Music Theatre
Dot (Katie Nix) imagines her dream job as a follies dancer in the Foothill Music Theatre production of “Sunday in the Park with George.” The play runs through March 8.

Foothill Music Theatre’s production of “Su...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

Is your thought life sabotaging your spiritual journey?

My computer started having problems – there seemed to be some sort of malware running in the background. At first it was just annoying, then it began to slow down my computer, interfering with its basic operations. What is it doing? Why can...

Read more:

Loading...

Magazine

Local events serve up family fun

Local events serve up family fun


Courtesy of Peninsula Youth Theatre
Peninsula Youth Theatre’s production of “Pecos Bill: A Tall Tale” is slated to open March 20 in Mountain View.

For families seeking a break from the daily routine, events abound this month and next in Los Alto...

Read more:

Loading...

Books help patients navigate stroke effects


It is sudden, unpredictable, life altering – and all too common. Every 40 seconds, someone in the United States has a stroke. A stroke can happen to anyone at any time.

A stroke is a medical emergency, yet many people do not know the warning signs. The American Stroke Association uses the acronym “FAST” to describe the signs of a stroke: Face drooping (F), Arm weakness (A), Speech difficulty (S) and Time to call 911 (T).

Time is of the essence when a stroke occurs. According to the American Heart Association, 150,000 Americans died from a stroke in 2010, and there are approximately 2 million stroke survivors in the U.S.

“Stroke” is a simple term to describe a complex problem. Sometimes referred to as a “cerebrovascular accident,” “cerebral infarction” or “brain attack,” a stroke is, in essence, a sudden brain injury caused by an abnormal blood supply to cells in a part of the brain. Strokes actually have many different causes and can vary widely in their impact. There are two main types of strokes: ischemic, caused by a loss of blood to the brain, and hemorrhagic, caused by bleeding in the head.

Because different parts of the brain control different functions, the impact of a stroke can vary in type and intensity. The common effects include speech and language problems, paralysis and weakness, pain, lack of coordination, loss of sensation, inability to swallow, bladder and bowel problems, mood disorders, cognitive deficits and inability to care for oneself.

Louis R. Caplan, M.D., renowned Harvard neurologist, recently wrote a book for stroke patients and their families. “Navigating the Complexities of Stroke” (American Academy of Neurology, 2013) can help patients work more effectively with their medical team to prevent and manage the effects of a stroke. As part of the American Academy of Neurology’s “Neurology Now” series, the book provides practical information for stroke patients and caregivers.

The second edition of “Navigating the Complexities of Stroke” centers on the case studies of four stroke patients, each with a different profile. Caplan begins by exploring brain anatomy and physiology, defining strokes and explaining why they happen. Later chapters describe types of strokes, the varied effects of strokes on the brain and the physical functioning of stroke victims. He outlines tests administered to individuals who may have had a stroke, available treatments and potential complications. Dysfunctions, disabilities and handicaps that may remain after a stroke have their own chapter, followed by one on recovery and rehabilitation.

Caplan closes with a practical section on planning for the future. Readers are taught how to maintain an emergency notebook as well as make formal and informal arrangements for care. He also addresses durable power of attorney, trusts, wills, guardianship and conservatorship.

Sara Palmer, Ph.D., a rehabilitation psychologist, and Jeffrey B. Palmer, M.D., a physiatrist specializing in stroke rehabilitation, focus on the unique way that caregiving for stroke patients affects spouses, in “When Your Spouse Has a Stroke: Caring for Your Partner, Yourself, and Your Relationship” (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011).

The authors have more than 25 years of experience caring for stroke survivors and their families at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Rather than duplicate the information found in many places about stroke caregiving and rehabilitation, the Palmers focus on the impact of a stroke on marriage.

The book discusses the challenges and opportunities a couple will experience post-stroke. Problems addressed include emotional stress, feelings of loss, changing roles and changes in sexual relations. Caregivers may find it difficult to take care of their own health needs and balance work and family responsibilities, and they may feel burned out.

On the flip side, there can be meaning and value in being a caregiver. Spouses may become closer and find that they have a shared sense of purpose. A stroke can even present an opportunity to fix problems that existed in the marriage before. Caregiver spouses are partners in stroke recovery yet often feel taken for granted. “When Your Spouse Has a Stroke” fills an important gap for caregivers and patients alike.

Both books can be found on the shelves of Stanford Health Library. For more information, visit healthlibrary.stanford.edu/resources/bodysystems/cardio_stroke.html.

To learn more about surviving and coping with a stroke and to find answers to specific questions, stop by, call or email the library. Librarians and trained volunteers will do the research for you.

The main branch of Stanford Health Library is located in Hoover Pavilion, 211 Quarry Road, Suite 201. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays. Library assistance is also available on the first floor of Stanford Hospital, near admitting, and on the main level of Stanford’s Cancer Center.

Nancy Dickenson is head librarian at Stanford Health Library. For more information, call 725-8400, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit healthlibrary.stanford.edu.

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos