Wed09172014

News

Meet the Mountain View City Council candidates

Meet the Mountain View City Council candidates


Nine candidates have filed to run for three open seats on the Mountain View City Council in the Nov. 4 election – none of them incumbents. The Town Crier asked them to introduce themselves to readers in the following Q&A format. We knew the...

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Schools

LASD committee looks to rank campus improvement projects

LASD committee looks to rank campus improvement projects


Traci Newell/Town Crier
The Los Altos School District’s newly expanded Facilities Advisory Committee met for the first time last week. The 28-member committee’s first task is to prioritize campus improvement projects.

The Los Altos Scho...

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Community

Sports

New-look Lancers find their footing

New-look Lancers find their footing


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
St. Francis High’s Jenna Adams, left, and Carly Deale attempt to bump the ball Friday night. The juniors combined for 28 kills.

This year’s St. Francis High girls volleyball team faintly resembles last season’s squad ...

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Special Sections

MV Whisman teachers cite low pay

MV Whisman teachers cite low pay


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
An estimated 75 supporters of higher teacher pay turned out for the Sept. 4 Mountain View Whisman School District board meeting.

Teachers, trustees and administrators are recovering from a dramatic Mountain View Whism...

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Business

Skin rejuvenation studio joins Rancho

Skin rejuvenation studio joins Rancho


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Esthetician Marjan Kashi showcases one of the treatment rooms at her new studio, Pure Serenity Skincare at Rancho Shopping Center. Kashi provides services including microdermabrasion and various light and heat energy the...

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Books

A woman's perspective on the Greatest Generation

A woman's perspective on the Greatest Generation


During World War II, Virgilia Short Witzel, a young mother and U.S. Navy officer’s wife, grappled on the home front in Menlo Park with wartime rationing, shortages and loneliness. During the ensuing Cold War, she experienced adventure and misadventur...

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People

JERALD (JERRY) NELSON CHRISTIANSEN

JERALD (JERRY) NELSON CHRISTIANSEN

Resident of San Jose and Los Altos, California

July 21, 1931 to August 4, 2014

Born in Arimo, Idaho, to Jerald Emmett and Rebecca Henderson Nelson Christiansen. Raised in Davis and Riverside, California, with summers in Downey, Idaho, and in Loga...

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Travel

LA photographer spends a night with cranes – and moose – in Alaska

LA photographer spends a night with cranes – and moose – in Alaska


Sandy Powell/Special to the Town Crier
Los Altos resident and bird photographer Sandy Powell recently visited Homer, Alaska, to photograph Sandhill cranes, below. While there, Powell also encountered moose, left.

Los Altos resident Sandy Powell, a...

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Stepping Out

Pear puts on a pair of plays

Pear puts on a pair of plays


J. Smith/Special to the Town Crier
Dan Kapler (as Teddy) and Betsy Kruse Craig (Trish) star in Pear Avenue Theatre’s “House.”

The Pear Avenue Theatre production of two interlocking comedies by Alan Ayckbourn – “House&...

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Spiritual Life

Back to Church Sunday offers opportunity to recommit

The children in Los Altos are back to school, and I can still hear parents cheering. Summer is officially over, even if the calendar doesn’t quite think so.

Parents have attended Back to School nights to meet their children’s teachers. B...

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Magazine

Los Altos Hills home showcases resort-inspired living

Los Altos Hills home showcases resort-inspired living


Courtesy of Spectrum Interior Design
In place of a more traditional fireplace, this modern living room features a linear-flame firebox that emits heat while offering a sculpturelike design element.

After traveling the world and visiting a host...

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Books help patients navigate stroke effects


It is sudden, unpredictable, life altering – and all too common. Every 40 seconds, someone in the United States has a stroke. A stroke can happen to anyone at any time.

A stroke is a medical emergency, yet many people do not know the warning signs. The American Stroke Association uses the acronym “FAST” to describe the signs of a stroke: Face drooping (F), Arm weakness (A), Speech difficulty (S) and Time to call 911 (T).

Time is of the essence when a stroke occurs. According to the American Heart Association, 150,000 Americans died from a stroke in 2010, and there are approximately 2 million stroke survivors in the U.S.

“Stroke” is a simple term to describe a complex problem. Sometimes referred to as a “cerebrovascular accident,” “cerebral infarction” or “brain attack,” a stroke is, in essence, a sudden brain injury caused by an abnormal blood supply to cells in a part of the brain. Strokes actually have many different causes and can vary widely in their impact. There are two main types of strokes: ischemic, caused by a loss of blood to the brain, and hemorrhagic, caused by bleeding in the head.

Because different parts of the brain control different functions, the impact of a stroke can vary in type and intensity. The common effects include speech and language problems, paralysis and weakness, pain, lack of coordination, loss of sensation, inability to swallow, bladder and bowel problems, mood disorders, cognitive deficits and inability to care for oneself.

Louis R. Caplan, M.D., renowned Harvard neurologist, recently wrote a book for stroke patients and their families. “Navigating the Complexities of Stroke” (American Academy of Neurology, 2013) can help patients work more effectively with their medical team to prevent and manage the effects of a stroke. As part of the American Academy of Neurology’s “Neurology Now” series, the book provides practical information for stroke patients and caregivers.

The second edition of “Navigating the Complexities of Stroke” centers on the case studies of four stroke patients, each with a different profile. Caplan begins by exploring brain anatomy and physiology, defining strokes and explaining why they happen. Later chapters describe types of strokes, the varied effects of strokes on the brain and the physical functioning of stroke victims. He outlines tests administered to individuals who may have had a stroke, available treatments and potential complications. Dysfunctions, disabilities and handicaps that may remain after a stroke have their own chapter, followed by one on recovery and rehabilitation.

Caplan closes with a practical section on planning for the future. Readers are taught how to maintain an emergency notebook as well as make formal and informal arrangements for care. He also addresses durable power of attorney, trusts, wills, guardianship and conservatorship.

Sara Palmer, Ph.D., a rehabilitation psychologist, and Jeffrey B. Palmer, M.D., a physiatrist specializing in stroke rehabilitation, focus on the unique way that caregiving for stroke patients affects spouses, in “When Your Spouse Has a Stroke: Caring for Your Partner, Yourself, and Your Relationship” (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011).

The authors have more than 25 years of experience caring for stroke survivors and their families at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Rather than duplicate the information found in many places about stroke caregiving and rehabilitation, the Palmers focus on the impact of a stroke on marriage.

The book discusses the challenges and opportunities a couple will experience post-stroke. Problems addressed include emotional stress, feelings of loss, changing roles and changes in sexual relations. Caregivers may find it difficult to take care of their own health needs and balance work and family responsibilities, and they may feel burned out.

On the flip side, there can be meaning and value in being a caregiver. Spouses may become closer and find that they have a shared sense of purpose. A stroke can even present an opportunity to fix problems that existed in the marriage before. Caregiver spouses are partners in stroke recovery yet often feel taken for granted. “When Your Spouse Has a Stroke” fills an important gap for caregivers and patients alike.

Both books can be found on the shelves of Stanford Health Library. For more information, visit healthlibrary.stanford.edu/resources/bodysystems/cardio_stroke.html.

To learn more about surviving and coping with a stroke and to find answers to specific questions, stop by, call or email the library. Librarians and trained volunteers will do the research for you.

The main branch of Stanford Health Library is located in Hoover Pavilion, 211 Quarry Road, Suite 201. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays. Library assistance is also available on the first floor of Stanford Hospital, near admitting, and on the main level of Stanford’s Cancer Center.

Nancy Dickenson is head librarian at Stanford Health Library. For more information, call 725-8400, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit healthlibrary.stanford.edu.

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