Fri02122016

News

SPLAT targets data, outreach as airplane noise continues

SPLAT targets data, outreach as airplane noise continues


Graphic courtesy of Don Gardner
Activists claim that a new SFO flight path leaves a “sound shadow” that impacts Los Altos and Los Altos Hills.

Sky Posse Los Altos Team – more simply known as SPLAT – seeks to squelch the noise...

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Schools

Los Altos High student-run charity plans '5 Gallon Gala'

Los Altos High student-run charity plans '5 Gallon Gala'


Courtesy of Lia Evard
Water by Youth members gave Egan students a chance to carry a 40-pound Jerry can, to see how difficult it is to obtain water in developing nations.

Water by Youth, a club at Los Altos High School, is making a splash by pla...

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Community

What would you do with a box of cookies? Local Girls Scouts help Tanzanian orphanage

What would you do with a box of cookies? Local Girls Scouts help Tanzanian orphanage


Courtesy of Alicia Madden
Sales of local Girl Scout cookies support service projects, such as funding an orphanage in the village of Mto wa Mbu in Tanzania.

Girl Scout cookies – whether you think of them as a treat, a tradition or a diet comp...

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Sports

Scoreless spells sink LA boys

Scoreless spells sink LA boys


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Los Altos High point guard Nolan Brennan attempts a shot in Friday’s game versus Palo Alto. He scored eight points in the loss.

There have been several games this season in which the Los Altos High boys basketball t...

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Comment

New 'York' values

New 'York' values


Hughes

 

As we have witnessed California suffer through one of its worst droughts in history over the past few years, all of us, I’m sure, have been keenly aware of our surroundings and have done a small part in trying to conserve wa...

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Special Sections

Getting a charge  out of the Volt

Getting a charge out of the Volt


Courtesy of Chevrolet
The 2016 Chevrolet Volt can be driven up to 50 miles on the power stored in its batteries.

Just five years ago, we wondered in this column what the power supply would be for the car of the future. Gasoline, diesel, electric ba...

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Business

Nearing V-Day: Shops stock sweets, treats

Nearing V-Day: Shops stock sweets, treats


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Los Altos resident Ella Roosakos, 11, with her mother, Gail, puzzles over which Gourmet Works sweets to buy as a valentine for Ella’s friend.

The gift-buying rush isn’t exclusive to Christmas. It may jump over...

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People

ALAN RODNEY MILLS

ALAN RODNEY MILLS

Alan Rodney Mills, PhD, 83, of Los Altos passed away peacefully on Saturday, January 30th, 2016. He was born in Rochdale, England in 1933 and came to California in 1962. He was a proud alumni of Manchester Grammar in England, University of Liverpoo...

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Stepping Out

PYT 'Gets Famous'

PYT 'Gets Famous'


Lyn Flaim Healy/Spotlight Moments Photography
Renee Vetter of Palo Alto, left, and Megan Foreman of Los Altos star in Peninsula Youth Theatre’s “Judy Moody Gets Famous.” Performances are scheduled Friday and Saturday.

Peninsula...

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Spiritual Life

A time to prepare: Fasting for Lent isn't limited to food

 

Today is Ash Wednesday, which in the Christian calendar marks the beginning of Lent – the 40 days of preparation for Resurrection Sunday, otherwise known as Easter.

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Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

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How new social-media trends harm children

The insults kept pouring in, the middle-school girl told me, until she read one that made it nearly impossible to concentrate on her schoolwork.

“U should die,” an anonymous poster had written.

She had stopped me after a presentation I’d given at her school and explained the nightmare she suffered over the previous school year after creating a profile at Ask.fm, a social-media site that allows people to leave nameless, faceless comments on others’ profiles. Over the past two years, Ask.fm comments have been linked to at least seven teen suicides.

Hours later, I gave a presentation for 200 parents at the young girl’s school. When I asked how many of them were familiar with Ask.fm, only two hands went up.

Over the past few years, I’ve seen teens shift their social-media habits to apps and sites that provide illusions of ephemeral and anonymous interactions – illusions that are quickly eroding their social and emotional well-being and that can have deadly consequences.

The Snapchat syndrome

In less than three years, Snapchat has exploded in popularity, with 400 million messages and photos sent through its system each day. Snapchat’s primary demographic is 13- to 23-year-olds, with at least 13 percent of teens admitting to using Snapchat regularly.

Many teens gravitate to Snapchat because they believe that messages and photos they send disappear seconds after recipients open them. In reality, Snapchat recipients have up to 10 seconds to capture a screenshot, and numerous Snapchat hacks allow users to save screenshots without notifying the sender. The FBI warns that pedophiles use Snapchat to lure young victims. A quick Web search of “Snapchat screenshots” reveals photos clearly unintended for public viewing, and begs the question: Who really believes in this online ephemerality?

Online whispers

The fixation with online anonymity is not limited to Ask.fm. There’s also Vine, Instagram, WhatsApp, Frankly, Skim, Ansa and Whisper, a mobile app that entices users to “share secrets, express themselves, and meet new people,” allowing them to make confessions or pose questions in hopes of eliciting an online reaction from others. Posted statements range from the innocuous (“I can’t believe I looked forward to growing up when I was young”) to the far more revealing (“I want to commit suicide”).

While some teens may look online for support with problems they feel uncomfortable discussing with family or friends, many experience how quickly and easily these apps can become an outlet for aggression and hostility. One in five teens claims that he or she has been harassed within the past 12 months, with 16 percent of them tormented online or via text.

The wrong conversation

Many young people feel that the Internet isn’t fun anymore. We’ve created so much fear around getting caught that we’re pushing them into hiding. A 2012 McAfee study revealed that 70 percent of teens actively attempted to conceal their online behavior from their parents.

Adolescents who are still building social and emotional resilience are often unable to cope with the onslaught of anonymous online interaction, and yet many of these latest apps target them as the key demographic. It is far more difficult for young people to develop empathy skills when they hide behind a computer screen – and nearly impossible when they falsely believe that their interactions will disappear and remain anonymous.

There is no simple solution to the complex world of teen online socialization. Most adults remain painfully unaware of the nuances, in part because they never experienced it themselves. Even adults who try to stay informed face an uphill battle as popularity constantly shifts. Teens are fickle – app popularity varies on a consistent basis.

Changing the conversation

The seventh-grade girl I talked with decided to delete her Ask.fm profile altogether. In less than a week, she felt a monumental difference.

“I feel like a weight has been lifted from my shoulders,” she pronounced triumphantly. “I am going to have a really great year this year.”

Teen online socialization is not going away. Parents, educators and young people must build awareness, set better guidelines around use and spend more time learning how each app works.

It’s no secret that adolescents should spend more time offline. A 2012 Stanford University study found that too much screen time could be detrimental to the social and emotional development of tween girls, and that the powerful antidote was simply spending more time conducting face-to-face conversations.

Ana Homayoun, author of two books for parents, is founder of Green Ivy Educational Consulting, 302 Main St., Suite 201, Los Altos. For more information, visit greenivyed.com.

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