Tue09302014

News

Meet the Santa Clara Valley Water District Board of Directors candidates

Meet the Santa Clara Valley Water District Board of Directors candidates

Two candidates have filed to run for the District 7 seat on the Santa Clara Valley Water District Board of Directors in the Nov. 4 election. The water district, established in 1929, oversees and protects water resources in Santa Clara County....

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Schools

New LAHS assistant principal focuses on school activities

New LAHS assistant principal focuses on school activities


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Suzanne Woolfolk, assistant principal at Los Altos High, teaches a leadership course for Associated Student Body leaders.

Suzanne Woolfolk – new assistant principal at Los Altos High School – said she is happy...

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Community

Petting zoo, car show highlight Chamber's annual Fall Festival

Petting zoo, car show highlight Chamber's annual Fall Festival


Courtesy of Los Altos Chamber of Commerce
The petting zoo is a highlight of the Los Altos Fall Festival. This year’s event is slated Oct. 4 and 5.

The Los Altos Chamber of Commerce has scheduled its 23rd annual Fall Festival 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oc...

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Sports

Burlingame bowls over Los Altos

Burlingame bowls over Los Altos


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Los Altos High halfback Sean Lanoza looks for running room against Burlingame in Saturday’s home opener.

The opening drive of Saturday’s game against Burlingame couldn’t have gone much better for the Los Altos High fo...

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Comment

Does Los Altos have a parking problem, or is it a symptom? : Other Voices

Yes, and yes. It appears that the downtown Los Altos parking problem is a symptom of the city’s “Sarah Winchester” approach to planning that instead of resulting in staircases to nowhere resulted in a hotel without parking required by code.(1)

From ...

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Special Sections

Los Altos landmark Four families later, Shoup House goes on the market

Los Altos landmark Four families later, Shoup House goes on the market


Courtesy of Matthew Anello
The Shoup House dining room, above, features original elements. The 100-year-old house on University Avenue earned a spot on the National Register of Historic Places, a nod to its legacy as the home of city founder Paul S...

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Business

Longtime banker readies for retirement

Longtime banker readies for retirement


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Joanne Kavalaris is retiring at the end of October after spending the past 25 years of her banking career in downtown Los Altos.

A longtime Los Altos banker is calling it a career in a few weeks.

Joanne Kavalaris, Bank o...

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Books

A woman's perspective on the Greatest Generation

A woman's perspective on the Greatest Generation


During World War II, Virgilia Short Witzel, a young mother and U.S. Navy officer’s wife, grappled on the home front in Menlo Park with wartime rationing, shortages and loneliness. During the ensuing Cold War, she experienced adventure and misadventur...

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People

VINCENT (TIM) MURPHY JR.

VINCENT (TIM) MURPHY JR.

July 27, 1953 – August 12, 2014

Native Los Altan died Medford, OR. Graduated Bellarmine Prep. Married Josephine Domino, 1950. Licensed Auto Mechanic, Private Pilot, skilled Computer Scientist. Tim “could fix anything”. Afflicted with cancer 2001. ...

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Travel

Taking a Turkey trek: Winging it during the World Cup

Taking a Turkey trek: Winging it during the World Cup


Rich Robertson/Special to the Town Crier
The sun sets over the Aegean Sea in Bodrum, Turkey, left.

Tours that whisk you from Istanbul to Bodrum in 11 days are as plentiful as souvenir hawkers in Turkey, but traveling from the Blue Mosque to Topkapi ...

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Stepping Out

Pear builds wonderful 'House'

Pear builds wonderful 'House'


J. Smith/Special to the Town Crier
Betsy Kruse Craig portrays Trish in the Pear Avenue Theatre production of “House,” which closes Oct. 5.

Mountain View’s Pear Avenue Theatre is staging an unusual theater-going experience – producing two plays...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

Local events add color to autumn calendar

Local events add color to autumn calendar


Van Houtte/town crier Visitors make their way through the Children’s Alley.

As Los Altos’ signature Chinese Pistache trees exchange their summer green for vibrant hues of yellow, orange and red in the fall, an abundance of local events also add ...

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Chris Clark will serve as the face of the city in 2014


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Chris Clark took the reins as Mountain View mayor last week. As in Los Altos, members of the Mountain View City Council take one-year turns serving as mayor.

Chris Clark assumed the role of mayor of Mountain View for 2014 at the Jan. 7 city council meeting. Following is an edited question-and-answer interview with the Town Crier.

Q: Tell us about yourself. Where are you from, how long have you been a Mountain View resident, where do you work and how did you get involved in city government?

Clark: I grew up on a family farm in rural Illinois and became interested in public service while serving as a page for the U.S. House of Representatives. I moved to the Bay Area to attend Stanford University and have lived in Mountain View for about seven years. I worked at a Mountain View tech startup that was acquired by a financial services company a little over a year ago and am now leading one of its product groups. I was first involved in Mountain View politics as a Human Relations Commissioner, subsequently transitioning to the Environmental Planning Commission and then won election to the city council in 2012.

Q: What are three goals you would like to see the city accomplish during your year as mayor?

Clark: This is the last year our current council will serve together. Three members are terming out at the end of the year, so I want to ensure that we wrap up several of the efforts my colleagues initiated. These include finalizing three of our major planning documents (San Antonio, North Bayshore and El Camino Real precise plans), carefully managing our budget until we fully recover from the recession and investigating ways to finance some much-needed infrastructure improvements.

Q: What do you see that the city does well, and where is room for improvement?

Clark: Mountain View is very well managed across the board, and a community survey last year indicated that residents are generally quite satisfied with our quality of life. However, there is always room for improvement, such as improving our transit infrastructure to reduce congestion and make biking/walker easier, streamlining the permit processes for residents and small businesses, and making more services and functions available online.

Q: What is the No. 1 concern residents bring to your attention?

Clark: I think residents right now are most concerned about the growth and development associated with our current economic cycle. Compared to most of the rest of the country, we are in the enviable position of having significantly more jobs than housing, but accommodating growth in an already dense 12-square-mile city is quite challenging and requires a delicate balancing act. Now that the economy has picked up, we’re dealing with some painful realities, such as the fact that no new rental housing was built in almost 10 years and that some level of new supply is critical if we want to keep prices somewhat in check and better meet demand. On the other hand, we must carefully balance this growth with the preservation of our quality of life.

Q: What do you see as the biggest misconception about the work of the city council?

Clark: One big misconception is that the city always says yes to developers and approves everything that comes before us. We have said no to spending any staff time on a number of projects and effectively turned them down at the earliest possible stage, but those decisions rarely make headlines. Having said that, we do vote to at least study and work with developers in many instances on projects we believe have the potential to provide significant community benefits. The misconception is that a vote to study something is effectively an approval. Even if a project makes it to the review process, the larger ones generally take a year or more of public meetings, scrutiny and significant revisions before coming to a final vote. Projects might be approved the majority of the time at the final approval stage, but that’s because months, if not years, were spent significantly revising the original plans to ensure that the project fits into the surrounding area well. We don’t always get it right, but we invest a lot of time and effort in the outreach and planning processes to try to ensure that we get it right.

Q: Are you holding office hours as mayor?

Clark: I plan to hold office hours twice a month, likely on Tuesday mornings. We’re still determining the exact time and will publish the schedule on the city website as soon it’s finalized.


Chris Clark becomes Mountain View Mayor - Photos by Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier

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