Mon06292015

News

LAH council approves  Page Mill Road expansion

LAH council approves Page Mill Road expansion


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
The Los Altos Hills City Council endorsed a plan to widen the congested Page Mill Road to six lanes between the Interstate 280 interchange and Foothill Expressway.

Infamously congested Page Mill Road should be widened to ...

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Schools

Local muralist tells a story of young Los Altos at two schools

Local muralist tells a story of young Los Altos at two schools


Eliza Ridgeway/Town Crier
Los Altos muralist Morgan Bricca, above, created a work at Covington School commissioned by the Class of 2015.

Just as school ended this year, new color bloomed on two Los Altos campuses – public art projects commissi...

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Community

Los Altos girl out to 'squash' inequality: 10-year-old raises funds for female players with motto Equal pay for play

Los Altos girl out to 'squash' inequality: 10-year-old raises funds for female players with motto Equal pay for play


Courtesy of Lisa Bardin
Mika Bardin displays a certificate of participation she received at the 2015 U.S. Junior Squash Championships. Although Mika is not competing in the upcoming NetSuite Open Squash Championships, she is helping other female pl...

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Sports

Hurdling adversity

Hurdling adversity


courtesy of Nicole Goodwin
Ella Goodwin, hurdling, above, has come a long way since her early-childhood battle with leukemia.

While Nicole Goodwin is proud of daughter Ella’s athletic achievements, it’s not her skills on the soccer field...

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Comment

No confidence in civic center proposals: Editorial

Few Los Altos issues have become more convoluted than the development of the 18-acre Hillview civic center property. Most agree that the area, as currently configured, needs improvement. But nothing has happened in the nearly 10 years since serious d...

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Special Sections

Star-spangled manor: Orange Avenue home boasts Americana theme

Star-spangled manor: Orange Avenue home boasts Americana theme


Megan V. WInslow/Town Crier
Los Altos resident Pinky Whelan’s Orange Avenue home features a patriotic theme, evident in her living room decor, her historical collections and displays and her welcoming entrance.

Let’s hear it for the red...

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Business

Thai Silks shutters Los Altos store this month

Thai Silks shutters Los Altos store this month


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
After more than 50 years in business in downtown Los Altos, Thai Silks is closing up shop at 252 State St. by the end of the month. The store will continue to offer its inventory online and via phone.

A longtime downtown ...

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Books

People

ALAN FRAZIER KREMEN, MD, PHD

ALAN FRAZIER KREMEN, MD, PHD

Alan Frazier Kremen, MD, PhD, aged 68, loving father & surgeon, of Stockton peacefully passed away on June 13th, 2015.

Born in Minneapolis on December 17, 1946, he received a BA from Stanford University, 1968, a PhD in Philosophy from the Univ...

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Travel

Venetian spa offers ways to de-stress

Venetian spa offers ways to de-stress


Courtesy of The VEnetian
The HydroSpa in the Canyon Ranch SpaClub at The Venetian in Las Vegas offers a muscle-relaxing bath and radiant lounge chairs.

Vegas cab drivers usually ask if you won or lost as soon as you get in their vehicles. They assum...

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Stepping Out

'Town' closes down

'Town' closes down


Chris Peoples/Special to the Town Crier
Hope Cladwell (played by Krista Joy Serpa) and Bobby Strong (Lewis Rawlinson) get romantic during their duet in “Urinetown: The Musical.”

The Los Altos Stage Company production of “Urinetown: The Musical” ...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

Living it up Older adults aim to age in place

Living it up Older adults aim to age in place


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Local enthusiasts flock to the Los Altos Senior Center to play bocce ball. The center hosts informal games four days a week and occasional tournaments.

As baby boomers in Los Altos, Los Altos Hills and Mountain View nose...

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Inside Mountain View

Carrying the torch

Carrying the torch


Members of the Mountain View Police Department carry the Special Olympics torch as they run along El Camino Real between Sunnyvale and Palo Alto June 18. Members of the department participate in the relay annually to show their support for Spec...

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Flu season enters full swing, particularly for the young


COURTESY OF CDC
Flu viruses can swap ribonucleoproteins, depicted above as green squiggles, one of two ways new strains emerge from existing virus types. Health agencies track the emergence of new strains and try to update vaccines to match each year’s most common strains.

The flu has arrived, but the seasonal scourge bears some good news this year – those who got a flu shot should be protected.

“So far this year the vast majority of the flu is covered by the H1N1 vaccine,” said Dr. Charles Weiss, a physician with the Palo Alto Medical Foundation. “WHO (World Health Organization) and the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) try to guess what’s going to be the most prevalent strain, and they’ve done a pretty good job.”

This year’s dominant strain, H1N1, caused pandemic illness in 2009. It earned the moniker “swine flu” because the respiratory virus had already been circulating in pigs. Since 2009, H1N1 has continued to crop up in humans but not necessarily as the most common flu virus. Last year, a variant, H3N2, dominated among those tested for flu. The varieties of flu surging in a given year can make a difference – not all types behave the same way.

“A lot of the damage is done by the H3N2 in seniors, and the H1N1 that we’ve had since the 2009 pandemic seems to be tougher on kids, young adults and middle-aged adults, not seniors,” Weiss explained.

The medical community hasn’t fully determined why the different strains of the virus strike different parts of the population, but seniors may be protected from H1N1 by immunity to a similar strain gained decades ago. Seniors are also more than twice as likely to get vaccinated than 18- to 49-year-olds. And young people who become seriously ill may have a vulnerability to the virus that is not yet well understood.

Local impact

As of Monday, four people had died of the H1N1 infection in Santa Clara County in this year’s outbreak, three people in their sixties and a 41-year-old woman. Medical providers have confirmed 13 cases of severe flu thus far this season that occurred in people under 65 and were serious enough to require hospitalization in an intensive-care unit.

“The scary part for a lot of people is that some of these are healthy young adults. The theme that seems to run through all of them, whether they have underlying disorders or not, is that most of them did not get vaccinated,” Weiss said. “Not being vaccinated puts you at risk. I think that the 18- to 50-year-old group thinks they don’t need it. Some years that’s closer to true, but this year it’s not true. Their old friend from 2009 is back with a vengeance.”

According to the CDC, flu activity typically peaks in the U.S. in January or February, though the season can begin as early as October and stretch as late as May.

“We started to see a trickle in mid-December, and really it’s just the last two weeks that it has picked up considerably,” Weiss said of the Bay Area.

The Public Health Department urges residents to get a flu vaccination if they haven’t already. Flu vaccine is still available at local pharmacies and is particularly recommended for people at risk of developing serious complications if they are stricken with the flu. That includes pregnant women, children younger than 5, people older than 65 and those with medical conditions such as asthma and diabetes. The Palo Alto Medical Foundation offers a preservative-free, latex-free flu vaccine to its patients.

Healthy people who do contract a flulike illness are advised to stay at home until their fever has been gone for 24 hours. Contact a physician if symptoms include shortness of breath, a fever greater than 102 F or a fever that lasts more than a few days.

The influenza virus is divided into three types, labeled A, B and C. Together, they’re responsible for the seasonal surge in flu infections. Both H1N1 and H3N2 are influenza A viruses. The H1N1 variant that emerged in 2009 (often called “2009 H1N1”) caused the first pandemic in more than 40 years. It has predominantly replaced its predecessors in circulation. This year’s quadrivalent flu vaccine protects against both types of influenza A and two types of influenza B.

For more information, visit cdc.gov/flu.

Flu prevention

Flu viruses are spread mainly through the droplets produced by coughing, sneezing or talking. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, healthy adults can spread the virus for a day before and five to seven days after becoming sick. Symptoms start one to four days after the virus enters the body.

• Cover your cough: Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.

• Wash your hands: Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze.

• Avoid spreading germs: Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Try to refrain from close contact with anyone who is sick.

• Stay home if you are sick: If you are sick with flulike symptoms, stay home from work or school.

Source: Santa Clara County Public Health Department

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