Sat02062016

News

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds


Graphic Courtesy of City of Mountain View
The purple parking lots above indicate where paid parking for the Super Bowl is allowed in downtown Mountain View. Other lots are open but still carry three-hour time constraints.

Downtown Mountain View wil...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school


Courtesy of Christine Lenz
Los Altos High junior Riley Fujioka, left, works with Animal Assisted Happiness program manager Simone Haroush-van Dam.

Research affirms that the therapeutic effects of animals help reduce stress in humans, and one Los Alt...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

Sports

Panthers outpace Priory

Panthers outpace Priory


Shirley Pefley/Special to the Town Crier
Pinewood’s Matt Peery lays up the ball in Friday’s win over Woodside Priory. Peery paced the Panthers with 19 points.

While height helps, the Pinewood School boys are proof that basketball is not ...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

From the City Manager's Desk: Fulfilling our mission

 

For those of us who work for Los Altos, the mission is “to foster and maintain the city of Los Altos as a great place to live and to raise a family.” The city’s employees take this mission seriously and – individually ...

Read more:

Loading...

Special Sections

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl


Photos Courtesy of Blanche Shaheen
Blanche Shaheen, above with her brother Issa, shares her Middle Eastern take on nachos – ideal for a Super Bowl party. Shaheen’s “Machos,” right, feature feta, tahini sauce, Persian cucumbe...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

Businesses on Main Street make moves

Businesses on Main Street make moves


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Several stores on Main Street in downtown Los Altos are in the midst of changing hands.

In the coming months, Main Street will welcome several new businesses to fill empty storefronts.

Jennifer Quinn, the city’s econo...

Read more:

Loading...

People

ROSEMARY FRASER

Rosemary Fraser, age 81, a long-time resident of the Los Altos/Palo Alto area, died peacefully Friday, the 22nd of January at her home. It was a sudden death; hypertension was the underlying cause.

Born in 1934 in Florence, Arizona, Rosemary enjoyed...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'


Otak Jump/Special to the Town Crier
Olga Chernisheva and Silas Elash perform in West Bay Opera’s “Eugene Onegin.”

The West Bay Opera production of “Eugene Onegin” is scheduled Feb. 19-28 at Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

How to cultivate childlike faith in a grown-up world

And Jesus said: “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.”

– Matt. 18:3

Read more:

Loading...

Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

Read more:

Loading...

Some question effectiveness of new bike law: Police say 3-foot rule easier to enforce, but some cyclists uncertain


Town Crier File Photo
The Three Feet for Safety Act, which takes effect in September, will require California motorists to give a 3-foot buffer on roadways to cyclists.

A new state law scheduled to take effect in September is intended to add a level of protection for cyclists sharing roads with motorists.

Assembly Bill 1371, known as the Three Feet for Safety Act, will require motorists to provide at least a 3-foot buffer in most instances when passing cyclists on roadways. The bill, signed into law by Gov. Jerry Brown in September, carries with it a base fine of $35 (approximately $150 with additional fees) for violators and a $220 fine in the event of a collision that causes bodily harm.

Los Altos Police Capt. Andy Galea said the city’s vast cycling community should see some benefits from the new law as it takes effect. He added that the law makes enforcement less of a judgment call for patrol officers than previous laws, which called for motorists to pass cyclists on the road “at a safe distance without interfering with the safe operation of the overtaken vehicle or bicycle.”

“Three feet is very definitive – and it’s easier to judge,” Galea said of enforcing the new law. “Really, anyone coming within 3 feet of cyclists – it’s just too close. Hopefully it will cut down on collisions and make it safer for the cycling community.”

Hard to enforce?

Two local cyclists say they’re not sure the new law will change much of anything.

Los Altos resident and avid cyclist Gary Hedden said that while the law could make enforcement easier for police, it likely wouldn’t change the overall habits of motorists in Los Altos.

“People who are careful drivers, and that’s the majority in Los Altos, leave 3 feet or more when they pass a bicycle, and they will continue to leave 3 feet or more next year,” Hedden stated in an email to the Town Crier. “The small group of people who are careless will continue to be careless. The law won’t easily change that.”

Hedden said the same logic holds true for motorists who have complained to him that the new law will make it “impossible” for motorists to pass a bike on a narrow road.

“The law allows drivers to slow down and carefully pass when road conditions don’t allow 3 feet. That’s what careful drivers do now, and will continue to do next year,” he said.

Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee (BPAC) Chairwoman Suzanne Ambiel, meanwhile, believes that enforcement of the new law won’t be as easy as it seems.

“The 3-foot law is nice, but is it enforceable? It’s going to be hard to do that,” said Ambiel, speaking on her own behalf, not as a representative of BPAC. “I mean, if you don’t have a way to really measure it, how could you know for sure?”

If anything, Ambiel said, the new law should be more effective in rural areas and would at least spread awareness to motorists about the dangers cyclists face on roads.

“It’s more recognition that bicycles belong on the roads, too,” said Ambiel, who noted that she’s had countless close calls “on any street you can imagine in every city.”

Galea agreed, noting that the new law should make some drivers more cautious when turning or executing other movements where potential conflicts exist.

“As this law begins to take effect and starts to get reinforced, hopefully people will become more aware of it,” he said. “That’s the big benefit of this.”

Ambiel concluded that the best advice she could give to motorists and cyclists sharing the roads is rather simple – at least in concept.

“It all boils down to everyone using some common sense and common courtesy – whether in a car or on a bike,” she said. “Common sense and courtesy go a long way in everything you do.”

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos