Mon05022016

News

Loyola Corners economics, traffic rise to top of planning concerns

Loyola Corners economics, traffic rise to top of planning concerns

Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Loyola Bridge construction parallel to the Fremont Avenue frontage may lead officials to alter circulation plans for the area.

Loyola Corners stakeholders last week mulled the issues that will likely shape the area&rsquo...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

LAHS Green Team commemorates Earth Week

LAHS Green Team commemorates Earth Week


Traci Newell/Town Crier
Los Altos High School Green Team members, above, quiz their classmates about water conservation. The club distributed plants as prizes during the club’s Earth Week activities.

Members of the Los Altos High School Green...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

Local pianist, 11, slated to perform Saturday at statewide competition

Local pianist, 11, slated to perform Saturday at statewide competition


Courtesy of the Cha family
Spencer Cha plays piano at a Santa Clara University recital. The sixth-grader also enjoys soccer, tennis, golf and skiing.

Spencer Cha has come a long way since he first sat down at the piano at age 2.

“I remem...

Read more:

Loading...

Sports

Spartans net second place, eye top prize next season

Spartans net second place, eye top prize next season


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Jeremy Hsu, Mountain View High’s top singles player, competes against Pinewood Thursday. The Spartans won the match 7-0.

With freshmen playing the top three spots in singles, the future of the Mountain View High boy...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

Los Altos at a leadership crossroads: Editorial

Don’t look now, but there could be some major changes ahead regarding how the Los Altos city government is run.

The current city council has the opportunity to hire a new city manager in the wake of Marcia Somers’ recent resignation. Fur...

Read more:

Loading...

Special Sections

How to personalize the wedding bar

How to personalize the wedding bar


Christine Moore/Special to the Town Crier
A seasonal signature cocktail adds interest beyond the standard wedding bar’s spirits and mixers. Focus on one set of fresh ingredients, such as blueberries, blackberries and mint for a dose of budget...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

Farmers prepare to market season's bounty

Farmers prepare to market season's bounty


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Journeyman farmer Jen Friedlander waters Hidden Villa’s greenhouse plants, which will grow stronger in the controlled indoor environment before being transferred to the field outdoors.

Around Hidden Villa, the gree...

Read more:

Loading...

People

BUOL JOANNE DOUGHERTY

BUOL JOANNE DOUGHERTY

1930-2016

Heaven gained a beautiful angel today. Our beloved mother’s blessed life ended in her Los Altos home surrounded by her loving family on April 18, 2016.

Buol Joanne Dougherty was born Sept. 28, 1930 in Chicago. At the age of two, M...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

'Catch' comes to conclusion LA Stage Co. comedy  ends run this weekend

'Catch' comes to conclusion LA Stage Co. comedy ends run this weekend


Richard Mayer/Special to the Town Crier
Bryan Moriarty, left, stars as Yossarian and John Stephen King plays the Psychiatrist in Los Altos Stage Company’s “Catch-22.”

Los Altos Stage Company’s presentation of “Catch...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

Statewide parent survey uncovers differences in school evaluations

Most parents claim that they don’t know about the new funding system in California schools but want to get involved in guiding how the funds are spent, according to a new survey by EdSource.

The statewide survey is the first to look at how connected and involved parents are with their children’s schools. It comes at a time when parents have been given a role by the State Legislature to provide input into how state education funds are spent through the Local Control Funding Formula now being implemented in schools across the state. Signed in July by Gov. Jerry Brown, the law also names parent involvement as one of several priority areas that schools must focus on.

The California Endowment underwrote the survey of 1,003 parents, conducted via telephone by the polling firm Fairbank, Maslin, Maullin, Metz & Associates Nov. 5-12.

Survey results

Fifty-seven percent of parents reported knowing “nothing at all” about the new funding formula, compared to 9 percent who said they knew “a great deal” about it, underscoring the challenge school districts and parent organizations face in educating parents about the new reforms.

Once parents were given a brief summary, 75 percent expressed support for the reforms, and one in 10 said he or she opposed them. Three-quarters (76 percent) said they were “very” or “somewhat” involved in their children’s schools, with close to one-third (30 percent) reporting that they were very involved. Most gave favorable ratings – an A or B grade – to their children’s schools, and most reported high levels of communication with them.

“Contrary to popular perceptions of many parents being disengaged from their child’s schools, the fact that parents are already involved in their child’s school, and feel welcome there, presents a good foundation for them to become involved in California’s new funding law,” said EdSource Executive Director Louis Freedberg.

Diversity of opinions

The survey revealed distinct differences between high-income and low-income parents, including:

• Nearly four in 10 parents (39 percent) who reported incomes of $100,000 or more describe themselves as “very involved,” compared with 24 percent of those reporting incomes of $30,000 or less.

• Forty-three percent of parents with incomes higher than $100,000 gave their children’s schools an A, compared with only 25 percent of parents with incomes of under $30,000.

• Thirty-nine percent of low-income parents felt that only a small group of parents had the opportunity to engage in decision-making at their children’s schools, compared with 19 percent of high-income parents.

According to Freedberg, the differences suggest that schools will have to work harder to engage low-income parents – whose children are one of the targets of the new funding legislation – in their schools.

“Because of what we know about the strong link between parent involvement and academic outcomes, it is reassuring that parents from all income levels want to be involved,” he said. “The challenge facing California’s education leaders is how to ensure that all of them have the opportunity to do so.”

Parents cited lack of time and conflicting work schedules as the major obstacles in getting more involved in giving input on how the funds will be spent.

They also said there were several steps schools could take to increase their involvement, including giving plenty of advance notice and assuring them that they would have a meaningful voice in the process. Nearly half said child care at meetings would also make a difference, and a smaller number said transportation and translations from English would help.

Most parents said they participate in a wide range of activities in their children’s schools. A smaller proportion reported that they attend school board meetings (30 percent) or participate in school site councils or other school or district committees (24 percent).

Parents also said they received much of their information about their children’s schools through their children. Other less dominant information sources included conversations with their children’s teachers and school newsletters. As schools develop communication strategies around the school funding law, the importance of children as a major conduit of information cannot be underestimated.

For more information, visit edsource.org.

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos