Tue02092016

News

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds


Graphic Courtesy of City of Mountain View
The purple parking lots above indicate where paid parking for the Super Bowl is allowed in downtown Mountain View. Other lots are open but still carry three-hour time constraints.

Downtown Mountain View wil...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school


Courtesy of Christine Lenz
Los Altos High junior Riley Fujioka, left, works with Animal Assisted Happiness program manager Simone Haroush-van Dam.

Research affirms that the therapeutic effects of animals help reduce stress in humans, and one Los Alt...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

Sports

Panthers outpace Priory

Panthers outpace Priory


Shirley Pefley/Special to the Town Crier
Pinewood’s Matt Peery lays up the ball in Friday’s win over Woodside Priory. Peery paced the Panthers with 19 points.

While height helps, the Pinewood School boys are proof that basketball is not ...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

From the City Manager's Desk: Fulfilling our mission

 

For those of us who work for Los Altos, the mission is “to foster and maintain the city of Los Altos as a great place to live and to raise a family.” The city’s employees take this mission seriously and – individually ...

Read more:

Loading...

Special Sections

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl


Photos Courtesy of Blanche Shaheen
Blanche Shaheen, above with her brother Issa, shares her Middle Eastern take on nachos – ideal for a Super Bowl party. Shaheen’s “Machos,” right, feature feta, tahini sauce, Persian cucumbe...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

Businesses on Main Street make moves

Businesses on Main Street make moves


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Several stores on Main Street in downtown Los Altos are in the midst of changing hands.

In the coming months, Main Street will welcome several new businesses to fill empty storefronts.

Jennifer Quinn, the city’s econo...

Read more:

Loading...

People

ROSEMARY FRASER

Rosemary Fraser, age 81, a long-time resident of the Los Altos/Palo Alto area, died peacefully Friday, the 22nd of January at her home. It was a sudden death; hypertension was the underlying cause.

Born in 1934 in Florence, Arizona, Rosemary enjoyed...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky’s ‘Onegin’

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky’s ‘Onegin’


Otak Jump/Special to the Town Crier
Olga Chernisheva and Silas Elash perform in West Bay Opera’s “Eugene Onegin.”

The West Bay Opera production of “Eugene Onegin” is scheduled Feb. 19-28 at Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305 Mid...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

How to cultivate childlike faith in a grown-up world

And Jesus said: “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.”

– Matt. 18:3

Read more:

Loading...

Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

Read more:

Loading...

Hang on to your books

I had a crippling dream recently. What if I couldn’t instantly access the answer to anything in the world I wanted to know?

I could go on and on about what-ifs, all ultimately tied to: What if my computer quit working? What if all the computers and servers that provide instant everything quit working? I will not elaborate on the way this might happen (we all know and appropriately fear the dreaded cyber attack), but what if it did? I can imagine a return to books. Think how valuable they could become – especially those encyclopedias and dictionaries.

Throughout history, prior to the technology revolution, the oral tradition (storytelling) and then the written word sustained our knowledge of just about everything. I remember how satisfying it was to go to the library and pull out the encyclopedia I needed to dig into for a class assignment about bugs or ancient Egypt. It was time-consuming and took real effort. But in that effort, learning became a true process – not just a minimal flick of my fingers as I typed a question into the Google toolbar.

The older I get, the more fleeting the information is in my brain. It’s just not as “sticky” as it used to be. My guess is that in today’s world, we are bombarded by so much information that we simply run out of byte space, so the minute we get the content we want, off it goes to who-knows-where to make room for the next bit of minutia coming our way.

But if I have to do some actual work, like reading a book to “learn” something (not just know it for a second or two, and never actually use that information), then I remember it. It also helps because we remember the book itself, how big it was and the color, etc. The feel of it becomes linked to the knowledge.

A cluttered mind is a scary place: I am anxious about what I don’t know yet but feel like I need to know to control my universe and, at the same time, housing all kinds of useless information that works itself out as worry. So, I am resolved to live more on a need-to-know basis by resisting the insane inclination to check my cellphone and email every second I am not engaged in an activity tied directly to my survival.

Perhaps I’ll take up reading poetry from a book, which takes some time to actually absorb and understand. And think how entertaining I will be to my friends and loved ones. Maybe, when they start talking about the frightening condition of the world and the imminent demise of our ecosystem, I’ll simply reply in my new Zen demeanor, “A rose is still a rose by any other name …,” at which point they will no doubt slowly back away as they Google on their cellphones “how to tell when your friend is losing it.” I’ll let you know how this works out for me.

Sharon Lennox-Infante is a Certified Life Coach who lives and works in Los Altos. For more information, visit sharonlennox.com.

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos