Mon04272015

News

LAH resident killed in cycling accident

LAH resident killed in cycling accident

A longtime Los Altos Hills resident and philanthropist struck by a bicyclist Monday (April 20) while walking along Page Mill Road has died from the injuries she sustained.

Kathryn Green, 61, died a day after the accident, according to the Santa Clar...

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Schools

LASD Junior Olympics scheduled Saturday

LASD Junior Olympics scheduled Saturday


Town Crier File Photo
The Los Altos School District Junior Olympics are slated Saturday at Mountain View High School. District officials say the opening ceremonies, above, are always memorable.

Los Altos School District fourth- through sixth-grader...

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Community

Altruism, adventure in Africa: Los Altos couple relates experiences in new book

Altruism, adventure in Africa: Los Altos couple relates experiences in new book


Courtesy of Wendy Walleigh
Rick and Wendy Walleigh spent a year and a half in Swaziland and Kenya.

Los Altos residents Rick and Wendy Walleigh experienced long, successful high-tech careers. But retirement? No, it was time for an encore.

Leavin...

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Sports

Workout warriors

Workout warriors


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Los Altos High gymnast Jessica Nelson soars by coach Youlee Lee during practice last week. Lee is a 2005 Los Altos High grad.

Some coaches would like to see their athletes work harder. Youlee Lee has the opposite problem ...

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Comment

Ending the debate: No Shoes, Please

In a general sense, everything is up for debate with me: What do I cook for dinner? Did I do the right thing? What color paint for the bedroom? Do I really want to go? Has the team improved? What difference does it make? Should I give him a call? Is...

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Special Sections

Fitness focus: No holds barred for Los Altos sisters

Fitness focus: No holds barred for Los Altos sisters


Photos Courtesy of Barre 3
Gillian Brotherson, kneeling at left, guides studio instructors through a workout at barre3 Los Altos.

Health is all about balance. That’s what two Los Altos natives learned as they navigated work, motherhood and welln...

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Business

Physical therapist brings business background to new Los Altos clinic

Physical therapist brings business background to new Los Altos clinic

Courtesy of Eliza Snow
Strive owner Robert Abrams, kneeling, runs a balance test.

With more than a dozen physical therapy clinics in Los Altos, one new business owner streamlined his approach in an effort to set his practice apart.

“I always wan...

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Books

People

CAPTAIN: CHARLES THOMAS MINOR

CAPTAIN: CHARLES THOMAS MINOR

Age 96

December 7, 1918  - March 28, 2015 

Chuck passed away peacefully in the home he built in Los Altos surrounded by his beautiful wife of 69 years, Bonnie, his two sons and their spouses, David Minor & Caryn Joe Pulliam; Steve &...

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Travel

Cuba libre: Local residents join mad rush of travelers

Cuba libre: Local residents join mad rush of travelers


Natalie Elefant/Special to the Town Crier
Los Altos resident Natalie Elefant noted the vibrant street performances as a traveler in Cuba.

The U.S. restored diplomatic relations with Cuba late last year, enabling Americans to import $100 worth of cig...

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Stepping Out

Stage fright

Stage fright


Joyce Goldschmid/Special to the Town Crier
“The Addams Family” stars, from left, Betsy Kruse Craig (as Morticia), Joey McDaniel (Uncle Fester) and Doug Santana (Gomez).

The Palo Alto Players production of “The Addams Family”...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

Food for thought: Hidden Villa programs offer teens training in sustainability on the farm

Food for thought: Hidden Villa programs offer teens training in sustainability on the farm


/Town Crier It’s not all cute and cuddly for teens participating in the eight-week Animal Husbandry Apprenticeship program at Hidden Villa in Los Altos Hills. Mia Mosing of Palo Alto, left, and Sophia Jackson of Los Altos clean the pigpens – one of...

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Inside Mountain View

Up to the challenge: Local leaders unite to help at-risk youth

Up to the challenge: Local leaders unite to help at-risk youth


Courtesy of Challenge Team
Jeanette Freiberg, bottom of pile, has fun with family members. The Challenge Team named Freiberg, a student at Mountain View High School, its 2015 Youth Champion.

There’s an ongoing joke among members of the Challenge...

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Hang on to your books

I had a crippling dream recently. What if I couldn’t instantly access the answer to anything in the world I wanted to know?

I could go on and on about what-ifs, all ultimately tied to: What if my computer quit working? What if all the computers and servers that provide instant everything quit working? I will not elaborate on the way this might happen (we all know and appropriately fear the dreaded cyber attack), but what if it did? I can imagine a return to books. Think how valuable they could become – especially those encyclopedias and dictionaries.

Throughout history, prior to the technology revolution, the oral tradition (storytelling) and then the written word sustained our knowledge of just about everything. I remember how satisfying it was to go to the library and pull out the encyclopedia I needed to dig into for a class assignment about bugs or ancient Egypt. It was time-consuming and took real effort. But in that effort, learning became a true process – not just a minimal flick of my fingers as I typed a question into the Google toolbar.

The older I get, the more fleeting the information is in my brain. It’s just not as “sticky” as it used to be. My guess is that in today’s world, we are bombarded by so much information that we simply run out of byte space, so the minute we get the content we want, off it goes to who-knows-where to make room for the next bit of minutia coming our way.

But if I have to do some actual work, like reading a book to “learn” something (not just know it for a second or two, and never actually use that information), then I remember it. It also helps because we remember the book itself, how big it was and the color, etc. The feel of it becomes linked to the knowledge.

A cluttered mind is a scary place: I am anxious about what I don’t know yet but feel like I need to know to control my universe and, at the same time, housing all kinds of useless information that works itself out as worry. So, I am resolved to live more on a need-to-know basis by resisting the insane inclination to check my cellphone and email every second I am not engaged in an activity tied directly to my survival.

Perhaps I’ll take up reading poetry from a book, which takes some time to actually absorb and understand. And think how entertaining I will be to my friends and loved ones. Maybe, when they start talking about the frightening condition of the world and the imminent demise of our ecosystem, I’ll simply reply in my new Zen demeanor, “A rose is still a rose by any other name …,” at which point they will no doubt slowly back away as they Google on their cellphones “how to tell when your friend is losing it.” I’ll let you know how this works out for me.

Sharon Lennox-Infante is a Certified Life Coach who lives and works in Los Altos. For more information, visit sharonlennox.com.

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