Tue06302015

News

LAH council approves  Page Mill Road expansion

LAH council approves Page Mill Road expansion


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
The Los Altos Hills City Council endorsed a plan to widen the congested Page Mill Road to six lanes between the Interstate 280 interchange and Foothill Expressway.

Infamously congested Page Mill Road should be widened to ...

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Schools

Local muralist tells a story of young Los Altos at two schools

Local muralist tells a story of young Los Altos at two schools


Eliza Ridgeway/Town Crier
Los Altos muralist Morgan Bricca, above, created a work at Covington School commissioned by the Class of 2015.

Just as school ended this year, new color bloomed on two Los Altos campuses – public art projects commissi...

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Community

Los Altos girl out to 'squash' inequality: 10-year-old raises funds for female players with motto Equal pay for play

Los Altos girl out to 'squash' inequality: 10-year-old raises funds for female players with motto Equal pay for play


Courtesy of Lisa Bardin
Mika Bardin displays a certificate of participation she received at the 2015 U.S. Junior Squash Championships. Although Mika is not competing in the upcoming NetSuite Open Squash Championships, she is helping other female pl...

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Sports

Hurdling adversity

Hurdling adversity


courtesy of Nicole Goodwin
Ella Goodwin, hurdling, above, has come a long way since her early-childhood battle with leukemia.

While Nicole Goodwin is proud of daughter Ella’s athletic achievements, it’s not her skills on the soccer field...

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Comment

No confidence in civic center proposals: Editorial

Few Los Altos issues have become more convoluted than the development of the 18-acre Hillview civic center property. Most agree that the area, as currently configured, needs improvement. But nothing has happened in the nearly 10 years since serious d...

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Special Sections

Star-spangled manor: Orange Avenue home boasts Americana theme

Star-spangled manor: Orange Avenue home boasts Americana theme


Megan V. WInslow/Town Crier
Los Altos resident Pinky Whelan’s Orange Avenue home features a patriotic theme, evident in her living room decor, her historical collections and displays and her welcoming entrance.

Let’s hear it for the red...

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Business

Thai Silks shutters Los Altos store this month

Thai Silks shutters Los Altos store this month


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
After more than 50 years in business in downtown Los Altos, Thai Silks is closing up shop at 252 State St. by the end of the month. The store will continue to offer its inventory online and via phone.

A longtime downtown ...

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Books

People

ALAN FRAZIER KREMEN, MD, PHD

ALAN FRAZIER KREMEN, MD, PHD

Alan Frazier Kremen, MD, PhD, aged 68, loving father & surgeon, of Stockton peacefully passed away on June 13th, 2015.

Born in Minneapolis on December 17, 1946, he received a BA from Stanford University, 1968, a PhD in Philosophy from the Univ...

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Travel

Venetian spa offers ways to de-stress

Venetian spa offers ways to de-stress


Courtesy of The VEnetian
The HydroSpa in the Canyon Ranch SpaClub at The Venetian in Las Vegas offers a muscle-relaxing bath and radiant lounge chairs.

Vegas cab drivers usually ask if you won or lost as soon as you get in their vehicles. They assum...

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Stepping Out

'Town' closes down

'Town' closes down


Chris Peoples/Special to the Town Crier
Hope Cladwell (played by Krista Joy Serpa) and Bobby Strong (Lewis Rawlinson) get romantic during their duet in “Urinetown: The Musical.”

The Los Altos Stage Company production of “Urinetown: The Musical” ...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

Living it up Older adults aim to age in place

Living it up Older adults aim to age in place


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Local enthusiasts flock to the Los Altos Senior Center to play bocce ball. The center hosts informal games four days a week and occasional tournaments.

As baby boomers in Los Altos, Los Altos Hills and Mountain View nose...

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Inside Mountain View

Carrying the torch

Carrying the torch


Members of the Mountain View Police Department carry the Special Olympics torch as they run along El Camino Real between Sunnyvale and Palo Alto June 18. Members of the department participate in the relay annually to show their support for Spec...

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Become your own health-care advocate

Some may call it Obama- care, but its official name is the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. While there has been a lot of fuss made over it, it is now the law. And it is arguably the biggest overhaul of the American health-care system since the introduction of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965.

States opened exchanges Oct. 1 to sell health policies to millions of previously uninsured Americans. Along with increased access to health care, the law also prevents Americans from being excluded from coverage based on pre-existing conditions, and coverage may no longer be rescinded because of health conditions. Young adults can stay on their parents’ plans until the age of 26, and women cannot be charged more than men. With millions entering the health-care system and mandatory coverage for prevention and wellness services, it is safe to say that both providers and patients will feel the law’s effect.

Undoubtedly, the need for people to become their own health-care advocates will be even more critical. The responsibility for making medical decisions is now shared between provider and patient. The era of the authoritarian doctor who “knows best” is over. Being able to talk with one’s doctor is a cornerstone of successful health care and essential for making the best medical decisions.

Two new books on the shelves of Stanford Hospital Health Library can help patients understand and communicate with their doctors.

The first is “Get Inside Your Doctor’s Head: 10 Commonsense Rules for Making Better Decisions about Medical Care” (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013). As medical science becomes more complicated, it becomes more important for patients to understand what the doctor is saying and doing. Author Phillip K. Peterson, M.D., an infectious disease specialist at the University of Minnesota, offers insight into how doctors think about complex medical issues. He writes in plain language without using medical jargon, so the book is easy to understand.

The book is valuable for both patients and physicians. The 10 “rules” originally were written to help doctors make medical decisions, but Peterson realized that they were equally useful for laypeople. The rules can help patients weigh recommended diagnostic tests and treatments as well as improve doctor-patient communication. Rule 1: “If you don’t know what you’re doing, don’t do anything.”

The Internet has put medical information at our fingertips, but in many ways, this has made decision making more difficult. There is so much information out there that it can be daunting for the average person to distinguish between reliable and unreliable information. This little book turns common sense into 10 simple rules that empower patients to participate in their own health-care decisions.

“Talking to Your Doctor: A Patient’s Guide to Communication in the Exam Room and Beyond” (Rowman & Littlefield, 2013) focuses on nurturing the “healthy conversation” between doctor and patient. Author Zackary Berger, M.D., believes that patient-provider relationships are at the core of health-care reform. Berger, a physician and professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, writes about the importance of communication in medicine.

“Talking to Your Doctor” teaches readers how to navigate a doctor’s office visit. Each chapter explores an aspect of patient care that may challenge effective communication. Berger gives valuable and practical suggestions to help patients overcome these challenges. Readers learn how to communicate when feeling intimidated, uncomfortable, undereducated, nervous or embarrassed. Among the subjects discussed are making the most of limited time in the exam room, telling your story and negotiating an agenda. The book teaches patients how to operate within the culture of the limited resources that permeate health care today.

Both books can be found on the shelves of Stanford Health Library. The main branch is located at Hoover Pavilion, 211 Quarry Road, Suite 201. Other branches are located on the first floor of Stanford Hospital and the main level of Stanford’s Cancer Center.

Nancy Dickenson is head librarian at Stanford Health Library. For more information, call 725-8400, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit healthlibrary.stanford.edu.

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