Mon02082016

News

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds


Graphic Courtesy of City of Mountain View
The purple parking lots above indicate where paid parking for the Super Bowl is allowed in downtown Mountain View. Other lots are open but still carry three-hour time constraints.

Downtown Mountain View wil...

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Schools

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school


Courtesy of Christine Lenz
Los Altos High junior Riley Fujioka, left, works with Animal Assisted Happiness program manager Simone Haroush-van Dam.

Research affirms that the therapeutic effects of animals help reduce stress in humans, and one Los Alt...

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Community

Sports

Panthers outpace Priory

Panthers outpace Priory


Shirley Pefley/Special to the Town Crier
Pinewood’s Matt Peery lays up the ball in Friday’s win over Woodside Priory. Peery paced the Panthers with 19 points.

While height helps, the Pinewood School boys are proof that basketball is not ...

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Comment

From the City Manager's Desk: Fulfilling our mission

 

For those of us who work for Los Altos, the mission is “to foster and maintain the city of Los Altos as a great place to live and to raise a family.” The city’s employees take this mission seriously and – individually ...

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Special Sections

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl


Photos Courtesy of Blanche Shaheen
Blanche Shaheen, above with her brother Issa, shares her Middle Eastern take on nachos – ideal for a Super Bowl party. Shaheen’s “Machos,” right, feature feta, tahini sauce, Persian cucumbe...

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Business

Businesses on Main Street make moves

Businesses on Main Street make moves


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Several stores on Main Street in downtown Los Altos are in the midst of changing hands.

In the coming months, Main Street will welcome several new businesses to fill empty storefronts.

Jennifer Quinn, the city’s econo...

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People

ROSEMARY FRASER

Rosemary Fraser, age 81, a long-time resident of the Los Altos/Palo Alto area, died peacefully Friday, the 22nd of January at her home. It was a sudden death; hypertension was the underlying cause.

Born in 1934 in Florence, Arizona, Rosemary enjoyed...

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Stepping Out

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'


Otak Jump/Special to the Town Crier
Olga Chernisheva and Silas Elash perform in West Bay Opera’s “Eugene Onegin.”

The West Bay Opera production of “Eugene Onegin” is scheduled Feb. 19-28 at Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305...

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Spiritual Life

How to cultivate childlike faith in a grown-up world

And Jesus said: “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.”

– Matt. 18:3

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Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

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The time to plan is when it's not needed

I received a call last year from a woman who sounded desperate.

“I was just offered an early-retirement package from my company,” she’d said, the words rushed from anxiety, “and I’ve got two weeks to make a decision. Can you help me?”

I groaned inwardly, imagining the late nights ahead struggling to collect the necessary data, performing the analysis and clarifying the results in a way that would enable her both to understand and to take action. But of course I did what I could to help.

It’s not uncommon to put off planning for something until we see the need for it. That’s human nature. But it’s also risky. 

Have you made a list and stashed away emergency supplies in case of an earthquake? What about a tornado? The latter may sound remote, but one actually touched down in my backyard in 1998.

The cost and stress of recovering from an unplanned problem is usually much higher than if we had planned for it. And we typically learn this lesson after it’s too late. When was the first time you started backing up your computer hard drive – before or after your first disk crash?

A recent survey by Nationwide Financial found that 26 percent of potential investors do not have a financial plan. Even worse: 38 percent of those who do not have one have no intention of getting one.

“We live in an era when Americans are more responsible for their own financial security than ever before,” said Michael Spangler, president of Nationwide Funds. “However, for various reasons far too many haven’t taken the time to draft a detailed financial plan to help them achieve their goals over the short, medium and long terms. An effective plan is much more than opening a savings account or investing in your employer’s 401(k), it’s a map to ensure that you get to your financial destination.”

Without a financial plan, we are left unprepared for life’s big transitions, such as job loss, marriage, divorce, birth of children, buying a house, inheriting money, death of a loved one and other events that can have such a huge impact on the quality of our lives. The emotional upheavals these life transitions can cause make it extremely difficult to make good financial decisions when we’re in the midst of one. The time to plan is before the event so that we’ll be much better prepared to manage the transition and its financial impact effectively and avoid getting sidetracked by the pain and stress.

Probably one of life’s biggest transitions is retirement. U.S. News reported that in 2009, between 60 and 80 percent of baby boomers expected to work past age 65 as a way to overcome the devastation of the Great Recession. Unfortunately, many failed to consider the employment situation or their health as factors. As a result, according to a follow-up survey by MetLife, more than half of the first wave of baby boomers to hit retirement age stopped working before they had planned. Many still hope for part-time jobs or developing new careers but have been struggling to find them.

The missing element in their plans was the inclusion of alternative scenarios. As humans, when we make guesses about the future, we almost inevitably predict more of the same.

Unfortunately, that’s not how life works. When we include different scenarios in our plans, we reduce our vulnerability (both emotionally and financially) to unexpected changes. The younger you are, the more likely you are to face a curve ball or two at some point in your future.

To summarize, the time to make a financial plan for your future is now, not when you’re in the middle of dealing with a major life transition such as divorce or job loss. A robust plan should include several scenarios to ensure that you’re prepared for at least some of the major problems life could throw at you.

Los Altos resident Artie Green is a Certified Financial Planner and principal at Cognizant Wealth Advisors. For more information, call 209-4062 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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