Tue07282015

News

Cal Water says no E. coli in water; limits boiling advisory area

Cal Water says no E. coli in water; limits boiling advisory area

Cal Water officials said today that preliminary water quality test results were negative for E. coli were negative and "only a single hydrant" in the South El Monte area of Los Altos showed the presence of total coliform. They reduced the "boil your ...

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Schools

Foothill STEM camps offer resources for low-income students

Foothill STEM camps offer resources for low-income students


Sana Khader/Town Crier
Students use software connected to a 3D printer, left, to create a miniature San Francisco, including the Ferry Building, below, at Foothill’s STEM Summer Camps.

Expanding efforts to spark and inspire students’ int...

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Community

Local resident cooks her way from cheerleader to Food Fighters

Local resident cooks her way from cheerleader to Food Fighters


Courtesy of the MacDonald family
Amber MacDonald competes on an episode of “Food Fighters,” scheduled to air 8 p.m. Thursday on NBC.

A newly arrived Los Altos family has an unusually public get-to-know-you moment this week – Amber MacDonald and ...

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Comment

Letters to the Editor

Ad-plane flyover marred festival

I hope that other residents who share my concern that the Geico plane flying low over the Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival and our homes for hours on end marred the “fun for everyone” that the Town Crie...

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Special Sections

Heart attack survivor cherishes life after near-death experience

Heart attack survivor cherishes life after near-death experience


Photos Courtesy of Tim Pierce
Los Altos Hills resident Tim Pierce, right with emergency medical responder Steve Crowley, suffered a heart attack in May.

After what Tim Pierce went through recently, no wonder he tries to cherish every moment as if he...

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Business

PAMF debuts cosmetic surgery center

PAMF debuts cosmetic surgery center


John Ho/Special to the Town Crier
The Palo Alto Medical Foundation Center for Cosmetic Surgery at 715 Altos Oaks Drive is the organization’s first center focused solely on cosmetic procedures.

Los Altos’ newest medical office – the...

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Books

Book Signings

• Fritz and Nomi Trapnell have scheduled a book-signing party 4-6 p.m. Aug. 1 at their home, 648 University Ave., Los Altos.

Fritz and his daughter, Dana Tibbitts, co-authored “Harnessing the Sky: Frederick ‘Trap’ Trapnell, ...

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People

CHARLOTTE BARBARA WINGUTH

CHARLOTTE BARBARA WINGUTH

Charlotte Barbara Winguth died July 9 at the young age of 89. She is survived by her 3 daughters Sandy, Karen & Wendi, 5 grandchildren and 2 great grandchildren. She came to Los Altos CA with her husband Ed and 3 children 53 years ago from New ...

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Travel

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories


Eren Göknar/Special to the Town Crier
San Francisco-based humangear Inc. sells totes, tubes and tubs for traveling.

In travel, as in romance, it’s the little things that count.

Beyond the glossy brochures lie the travel discomforts too mun...

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Stepping Out

Engineer builds second career as actor

Engineer builds second career as actor


David Allen/Special to the Town Crier
Actors rehearse for Foothill Music Theatre’s “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum.” The cast includes, from left, Tomas Theriot, Todd Wright, Mike Meadors and Ray D’Ambrosio. ...

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Spiritual Life

Christ Episcopal pastor departs Los Altos for new post in SF

Christ Episcopal pastor departs Los Altos for new post in SF


Courtesy of Sara BoaDwee
Christ Episcopal Church celebrated the ministry of the Rev. Dr. Malcolm Young and his wife, Heidi, at a farewell luau June 28.

Members and friends of Christ Episcopal Church bid farewell June 28 to the Rev. Dr. Malcolm C. Yo...

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Magazine

Inside Mountain View

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
NASA Ames’ Pluto Flyover event kindles the imaginations of young attendees.

Sue Moore watched the July 20, 1969, moon landing beside patients and staff members of the San Francisco hospital where she worked as a nurse...

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Hidden Villa's summer experience plants seeds that last a lifetime



Youth who attend summer camps at Hidden Villa benefit from both the social interaction and communing with nature. Town Crier file photo

Youth circle around a countertop island in a small kitchen learning to bake a cake as others converse under a grove of trees on an outdoor patio. Minutes later, with baskets and shovels in hand, the teens fan out across the farmyard to clean bedding from the pigpens and gather eggs in the henhouse.

There are no televisions, mobile phones or fast food anywhere in sight, but these campers don’t seem to notice. The magic of Hidden Villa – the 1,600-acre nonprofit organic farm and preserve in Los Altos Hills – sets in, giving modern adolescents a memorable experience with lasting impact.

“Overall, it just has the best vibe around it possible,” said 17-year-old Hidden Villa camper and counselor-in-training Steffan Salas. “It’s really a nonjudgmental place where you can be yourself. … It’s pretty hard to find a place like that.”

Salas, a high school senior from Menlo Park who has spent 11 summers at Hidden Villa Summer Camp, noted that camp counselors and other campers serve as an important support network as he navigates the pathway to adulthood. Last summer he returned to Hidden Villa for his first “official paying job” as a residential camp intern.

“It’s kind of cool to move on from a part of childhood and start acting and fulfilling an adult role here and in life in general,” he said.

Whether at day camps for first- through fourth-grade children, or wilderness camps in the Santa Cruz Mountains for eighth- through 10th-graders, molding young people into responsible citizens is an important component of the Hidden Villa experience, which has roots in promoting social justice since it hosted the nation’s first multiracial camp in 1945.

According to Hidden Villa Camp Director Nikki Bryant, staff members are trained to be educators who can facilitate conversations that encourage curiosity and critical thinking. Evening gatherings at the campfire allow campers to reflect on issues of race, class, gender, sexuality, family and the environment.

“We show them how the actions they perform are contributing to the well-being of the community they’re in,” Bryant said. “We reach for growth and connection in a way that the world often fails to do for people.”

Contributions from the Town Crier Holiday Fund and other donors enable youth of all socioeconomic backgrounds to participate in the Hidden Villa camp experience.

Nearly 50 percent of the 1,200 students who attend camp each summer are supported by a scholarship. Bryant said a stockpile of camp necessities like sleeping bags and swimsuits donated by local residents are also available, a measure that ensures a positive experience for every camper.

“We want (youth) to be somewhere where they can wander around without having to worry about the complications they’re used to in their communities,” she said. “Camp provides you with an opportunity to talk with one another, resolve conflict and be confident in what you do – something our society just doesn’t have a lot of systems for.”

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