Fri05292015

News

MV vehicle collision leaves one dead

A traffic accident Thursday morning (May 28) on Moffett Boulevard, near the Highway 85 overpass in Mountain View, has left one person dead.

The victim is a 25-year-old Gilroy resident, according to the Mountain View Police Department, which has not ...

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Schools

Students discuss academic, social pressure in CHAC forum

Students discuss academic, social pressure in CHAC forum


Traci Newell/Town Crier
Community Health Awareness Council hosted a forum earlier this month where local students discussed the varied pressures they face.

Local students face enormous pressures in their lives, ranging from academic to social, but s...

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Community

Alan Alda discusses career, family and science at the Celebrity Forum

Alan Alda discusses career, family and science at the Celebrity Forum


Alda

Those who laughed along with Hawkeye Pierce on the long-running TV program “M*A*S*H*” would have enjoyed the recent Foothill College Celebrity Forum Speakers Series featuring actor Alan Alda.

Alda appeared May 13-15 at the Flint Center for...

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Sports

Eagles, Spartans advance

Eagles, Spartans advance


Town Crier file photo
Los Altos High’s Lizzy Beutter registered three hits in last week’s playoff win over Watsonville. She was also the winning pitcher.

Led by Lizzy Beutter, host Los Altos High whipped Watsonville 9-0 in the opening ro...

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Comment

Giving the thumb to what's done: Editorial

In the wake of recent Los Altos-area news events, we’re all thumbs.

Thumbs-down: To the Los Altos City Council’s decision to put the Walter Singer bust in storage. This is wrong on so many levels – even worse than the initial council decision to tra...

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Special Sections

Planting is possible despite drought

Planting is possible despite drought


Tanya Kucak/Special to the Town Crier
Wash the soilless mix off the root ball into the same container in which you have placed the clay soil from the planting hole. Remove at least an inch from the top and sides of the plant.

In this continuin...

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Business

Los Altos-based startup eyes digital makeup color-matching

Los Altos-based startup eyes digital makeup color-matching


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Kokko Inc. Makeup Director Meli Pennington, standing, tests different shades of foundation on Los Altos resident Karen Melchior.

Meli Pennington knows cosmetics.

She has painted faces for the pages of Vogue and Glamour,...

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Books

Horan's 'Loving Frank' offers fictionalized account of famed architect's illicit affair

Horan's 'Loving Frank' offers fictionalized account of famed architect's illicit affair


In the 1920s, two married people fall in love, leave their spouses and children and set about living and traveling together. Affairs of this sort were considered shocking at the time. But the scandal was heightened given that the man was Frank Lloy...

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People

GUY WILSON SHOUP

Guy Wilson Shoup, 80, died on April 28, 2015, at his Palo Alto apartment, after a long period of ill health. Born on November 22, 1934, to Margaret Owen Shoup and to Jack Wilson Shoup (the second son of Paul Shoup, widely considered the founder of Lo...

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Travel

Flying south for the winter: Antarctica trips are not just for the birds

Flying south for the winter: Antarctica trips are not just for the birds


Photos Courtesy of Dave Hadden
Los Altos residents Dave and Joan Hadden watched the scenery from the large boat and a smaller Zodiac.

Standing on the beach with hundreds of thousands of penguins is “the experience of a lifetime,” according to Ga...

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Stepping Out

LA Stage Co. goes to 'town'

LA Stage Co. goes to 'town'


courtesy of Los Altos Stage Company
The Los Altos Stage Company production of “Urinetown: The Musical” opens this weekend.

The Los Altos Stage Company caps its 19th season with the musical comedy “Urinetown: The Musical,” scheduled to preview Th...

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Spiritual Life

Mercifully in His grip: Exploring our true position in Christ

I recently read a wonderful analogy about our true position in Christ. It was shockingly contrary to the messages impressed upon me in church, but deeply rooted in the Bible. The analogy is that of child and a parent. If you have ever taken a small ...

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Magazine

Practice prudent pruning: Maintaining manzanita, ceanothus and toyon

Practice prudent pruning: Maintaining manzanita, ceanothus and toyon


tanya kucak/Special to the Town Crier
Shrub manzanitas are known for their sinuous mahogany trunks and branches. If the foliage hides the bark, prune selectively to open the center so that the bark is visible year-round. This Montara manzanita is ...

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Inside Mountain View

Artist, former LAHS teacher Garoian inspired a generation of 'misfits'


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Charles Garoian, left, who taught art at Los Altos High School for 17 years, reunites with former students at his gallery exhibition, part of “Project Los Altos.”

He wasn’t supposed to get hired. When Charles Garoian arrived at Los Altos High School in 1969 for an interview armed with his portfolio of creative work, he was a bit flummoxed when the principal explained that he was actually looking for a tennis coach.

“I can play tennis, but I’m not that good,” said Garoian in his interview. “I just want to teach art.”

With a few more words and a portfolio review by the outgoing art teacher, Garoian was hired. Thus began his 17-year tenure at Los Altos High, which resulted in many more hits than misses, particularly for the students he unabashedly calls the “misfits.”

Reuniting with students

Fast-forward 43 years. Garoian, now a professor of art education at Pennsylvania State University with decades of performance-art experience, papers and awards under his belt, returns to Los Altos as one of nine featured artists in “Project Los Altos: SFMOMA in the Silicon Valley,” which opened last week and runs through March.

Before the grand unveiling at 359 State St. of a video of stills that chronicled the most memorable performance his Los Altos High students created, Garoian sifted through Facebook to locate former students and invite them to a reunion viewing.

Hugs, smiles and a few double takes cascaded forth as a dozen former students and colleagues trickled into Garoian’s exhibit space. Conversation flowed with ease. Except for the grayer and/or diminished hair, it was nearly as if they were frozen in time, simply returning to a routine conversation after class. As students shared stories of the paths they had followed with Garoian and his wife, Sherrie – who remembers spending many hours with students in their family’s home – it was clear that Garoian had been more than a teacher to them.

“I hated high school,” said Jeff Loughridge, Class of 1971, who enrolled in sculpture and ceramics classes taught by Garoian during his inaugural years at Los Altos High.

Loughridge said Garoian’s impact was rooted in his ability to challenge students to think “beyond their level.”

“I think you improved my life drastically, but ruined my life for college,” Loughridge humorously told Garoian.

Decades into his career, Loughridge has enjoyed success as art director for a national magazine and owner of his own graphic design business.

Learning experiences that lasted

Although somewhat unconventional or even wacky by some accounts, Garoian pushed his students to “flip the metaphors” through conceptual performance art.

Adrienne Levine, who graduated in 1985, recalls the time she sat behind the glass facade of a school trophy case with another classmate. Although she noted that doing homework would not normally warrant attention, when it took place in an unusual public context, it became a noteworthy focal point. By following Garoian’s encouragement to dare to do things differently, she grew as an artist. Such experiences spurred her to major in photography at New York University.

Larkspur architect Mark Sandoval enrolled in Garoian’s class because he wanted to learn to draw. Instead of teaching him, Garoian turned the tables and informed Sandoval that learning to draw was in his own hands.

“He made an enormous difference in my life by taking me under his wing to show me what the visual arts were,” Sandoval said.

Not every project went without a hitch. Sandoval and Garoian can now laugh about a “disastrous” group mural painting project.

“I learned that you can’t put artists together unless they’ve agreed to be collaborators,” Garoian said of his mistake of assigning his best art students to a project that resulted in more practice in the politics of negotiation than in art. “It remained unfinished but still looked good.”

“Sometimes the student is the teacher,” Garoian said. “I’m not interested in art as an academic subject, but as an experiment.”

Another near-miss was a choreographed homecoming parade performance appropriately titled “Drill Team.” When a group of students approached him with the idea for a homecoming prank in 1973, Garoian challenged them to think deeper.

After a late-night practice on the empty streets of Los Altos, his art students arrived at the annual homecoming parade ready to infiltrate as 40 blue-collar workers marching with military precision as they cranked hand drills into pieces of wood – a play on the words “drill team.”

Unsettled by the surprise entrance in the parade, Principal Dude Angius attempted to sidetrack the group and placed the team directly behind a collection of Porsches, adding even more irony to their creation as they marched through downtown. The performance elicited lots of laughter and was so successful that the principal asked Garoian to continue the tradition. He refused the offer.

“Some things have to happen organically or they lose their power,” he said.

Garoian left Silicon Valley behind when he moved to Penn State to continue his teaching career, but his influence remained.

“This guy was the one who made the biggest impact on me,” said Alan “Eye Bone” Eglington, a cartoonist, conceptual artist and musician who graduated in 1971. “He taught us what else you could do in life.”

For a full guide to "Project Los Altos: SFMOMA in the Silicon Valley, " click here.

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