Mon07062015

News

Effective today, library cards free again in Los Altos

Both Los Altos libraries should see a spike in use soon. After the elimination of an $80 annual card fee that had been in place since 2011, nonresidents will receive free library cards at local libraries, effective today.

Residents of Mountain View ...

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Schools

Almond fifth-graders set sail at Shoreline

Almond fifth-graders set sail at Shoreline


Courtesy of Corinne Finegan Machatzke
Fifth- graders at Almond School launched the boats they designed and built at Shoreline Lake last month.

Almond School fifth-graders boarded their handmade boats at Shoreline Lake in Mountain View last month to...

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Community

Taking it back to 'The Streets': Local filmmaker aims to revive 1970s series 'Streets of San Francisco'

Taking it back to 'The Streets': Local filmmaker aims to revive 1970s series 'Streets of San Francisco'


Courtesy of Charles Alley
Charles Alley’s filmmaking company may be based in Mountain View, but he knows all about “The Streets of San Francisco.” He’s rebooting the 1970s TV classic.

When people look for the next hit TV show, they often assume ...

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Sports

Enjoying the moment


Courtesy of Dick D’OlivA
Former Golden State Warriors trainer Dick D’Oliva, from left, wife Vi, former Warriors assistant coach Joe Roberts and wife Celia ride on a cable car in the victory parade.

Dick D’Oliva almost couldn’...

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Comment

The death knell of suburbia: A Piece of My Mind

The orchards are gone. The single-story ranch house is seen as a waste of valuable land and air space. An eight-lane freeway thunders past the bridle paths in Los Altos Hills. But nothing has signaled the death of suburbia more strongly than the ann...

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Special Sections

While competent & safe, MKC still can't catch European competitors

While competent & safe, MKC still can't catch European competitors


courtesy of Ford
The 2015 Lincoln MKC doesn’t overwhelm as far as overall performance goes, but it does offer comfortable ride quality.

Of all the auto companies with headquarters in the United States, only Ford managed to weather the great re...

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Business

Company installs EV charging stations at LAHS

Company installs EV charging stations at LAHS


Courtesy of Green Charge
Officials from Los Altos, Los Altos Hills and the Mountain View Los Altos Union High School District celebrate the installation of electric-vehicle charging stations at Los Altos High last week.

The Mountain View Los Alto...

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Books

People

HILDA CLAIRE FENTON

Hilda Claire Fenton, beloved wife and mom to 9, grandmother to 30 and great grandmother to 22, passed away June 20 following a long illness. She was 90.

Hilda was born Sept. 28, 1924, to Lois and Gus Farley then of Logan, W. Va. While she was still ...

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Travel

Venetian spa offers ways to de-stress

Venetian spa offers ways to de-stress


Courtesy of The VEnetian
The HydroSpa in the Canyon Ranch SpaClub at The Venetian in Las Vegas offers a muscle-relaxing bath and radiant lounge chairs.

Vegas cab drivers usually ask if you won or lost as soon as you get in their vehicles. They assum...

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Stepping Out

Cast carries 'Arcadia'

Cast carries 'Arcadia'


Courtesy of Pear Avenue Theatre
“Arcadia” stars Monica Ammerman and Robert Sean Campbell.

The intimate setting of Mountain View’s Pear Avenue Theatre proves the perfect place to stage “Arcadia,” allowing audience members to feel as though they a...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

Living it up Older adults aim to age in place

Living it up Older adults aim to age in place


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Local enthusiasts flock to the Los Altos Senior Center to play bocce ball. The center hosts informal games four days a week and occasional tournaments.

As baby boomers in Los Altos, Los Altos Hills and Mountain View nose...

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Inside Mountain View

Carrying the torch

Carrying the torch


Members of the Mountain View Police Department carry the Special Olympics torch as they run along El Camino Real between Sunnyvale and Palo Alto June 18. Members of the department participate in the relay annually to show their support for Spec...

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Artist, former LAHS teacher Garoian inspired a generation of 'misfits'


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Charles Garoian, left, who taught art at Los Altos High School for 17 years, reunites with former students at his gallery exhibition, part of “Project Los Altos.”

He wasn’t supposed to get hired. When Charles Garoian arrived at Los Altos High School in 1969 for an interview armed with his portfolio of creative work, he was a bit flummoxed when the principal explained that he was actually looking for a tennis coach.

“I can play tennis, but I’m not that good,” said Garoian in his interview. “I just want to teach art.”

With a few more words and a portfolio review by the outgoing art teacher, Garoian was hired. Thus began his 17-year tenure at Los Altos High, which resulted in many more hits than misses, particularly for the students he unabashedly calls the “misfits.”

Reuniting with students

Fast-forward 43 years. Garoian, now a professor of art education at Pennsylvania State University with decades of performance-art experience, papers and awards under his belt, returns to Los Altos as one of nine featured artists in “Project Los Altos: SFMOMA in the Silicon Valley,” which opened last week and runs through March.

Before the grand unveiling at 359 State St. of a video of stills that chronicled the most memorable performance his Los Altos High students created, Garoian sifted through Facebook to locate former students and invite them to a reunion viewing.

Hugs, smiles and a few double takes cascaded forth as a dozen former students and colleagues trickled into Garoian’s exhibit space. Conversation flowed with ease. Except for the grayer and/or diminished hair, it was nearly as if they were frozen in time, simply returning to a routine conversation after class. As students shared stories of the paths they had followed with Garoian and his wife, Sherrie – who remembers spending many hours with students in their family’s home – it was clear that Garoian had been more than a teacher to them.

“I hated high school,” said Jeff Loughridge, Class of 1971, who enrolled in sculpture and ceramics classes taught by Garoian during his inaugural years at Los Altos High.

Loughridge said Garoian’s impact was rooted in his ability to challenge students to think “beyond their level.”

“I think you improved my life drastically, but ruined my life for college,” Loughridge humorously told Garoian.

Decades into his career, Loughridge has enjoyed success as art director for a national magazine and owner of his own graphic design business.

Learning experiences that lasted

Although somewhat unconventional or even wacky by some accounts, Garoian pushed his students to “flip the metaphors” through conceptual performance art.

Adrienne Levine, who graduated in 1985, recalls the time she sat behind the glass facade of a school trophy case with another classmate. Although she noted that doing homework would not normally warrant attention, when it took place in an unusual public context, it became a noteworthy focal point. By following Garoian’s encouragement to dare to do things differently, she grew as an artist. Such experiences spurred her to major in photography at New York University.

Larkspur architect Mark Sandoval enrolled in Garoian’s class because he wanted to learn to draw. Instead of teaching him, Garoian turned the tables and informed Sandoval that learning to draw was in his own hands.

“He made an enormous difference in my life by taking me under his wing to show me what the visual arts were,” Sandoval said.

Not every project went without a hitch. Sandoval and Garoian can now laugh about a “disastrous” group mural painting project.

“I learned that you can’t put artists together unless they’ve agreed to be collaborators,” Garoian said of his mistake of assigning his best art students to a project that resulted in more practice in the politics of negotiation than in art. “It remained unfinished but still looked good.”

“Sometimes the student is the teacher,” Garoian said. “I’m not interested in art as an academic subject, but as an experiment.”

Another near-miss was a choreographed homecoming parade performance appropriately titled “Drill Team.” When a group of students approached him with the idea for a homecoming prank in 1973, Garoian challenged them to think deeper.

After a late-night practice on the empty streets of Los Altos, his art students arrived at the annual homecoming parade ready to infiltrate as 40 blue-collar workers marching with military precision as they cranked hand drills into pieces of wood – a play on the words “drill team.”

Unsettled by the surprise entrance in the parade, Principal Dude Angius attempted to sidetrack the group and placed the team directly behind a collection of Porsches, adding even more irony to their creation as they marched through downtown. The performance elicited lots of laughter and was so successful that the principal asked Garoian to continue the tradition. He refused the offer.

“Some things have to happen organically or they lose their power,” he said.

Garoian left Silicon Valley behind when he moved to Penn State to continue his teaching career, but his influence remained.

“This guy was the one who made the biggest impact on me,” said Alan “Eye Bone” Eglington, a cartoonist, conceptual artist and musician who graduated in 1971. “He taught us what else you could do in life.”

For a full guide to "Project Los Altos: SFMOMA in the Silicon Valley, " click here.

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