Wed07292015

News

Cal Water says no E. coli in water; limits boiling advisory area

Cal Water says no E. coli in water; limits boiling advisory area

Cal Water officials said today that preliminary water quality test results were negative for E. coli were negative and "only a single hydrant" in the South El Monte area of Los Altos showed the presence of total coliform. They reduced the "boil your ...

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Schools

Foothill STEM camps offer resources for low-income students

Foothill STEM camps offer resources for low-income students


Sana Khader/Town Crier
Students use software connected to a 3D printer, left, to create a miniature San Francisco, including the Ferry Building, below, at Foothill’s STEM Summer Camps.

Expanding efforts to spark and inspire students’ int...

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Community

Local resident cooks her way from cheerleader to Food Fighters

Local resident cooks her way from cheerleader to Food Fighters


Courtesy of the MacDonald family
Amber MacDonald competes on an episode of “Food Fighters,” scheduled to air 8 p.m. Thursday on NBC.

A newly arrived Los Altos family has an unusually public get-to-know-you moment this week – Amber MacDonald and ...

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Comment

Letters to the Editor

Ad-plane flyover marred festival

I hope that other residents who share my concern that the Geico plane flying low over the Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival and our homes for hours on end marred the “fun for everyone” that the Town Crie...

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Special Sections

Heart attack survivor cherishes life after near-death experience

Heart attack survivor cherishes life after near-death experience


Photos Courtesy of Tim Pierce
Los Altos Hills resident Tim Pierce, right with emergency medical responder Steve Crowley, suffered a heart attack in May.

After what Tim Pierce went through recently, no wonder he tries to cherish every moment as if he...

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Business

PAMF debuts cosmetic surgery center

PAMF debuts cosmetic surgery center


John Ho/Special to the Town Crier
The Palo Alto Medical Foundation Center for Cosmetic Surgery at 715 Altos Oaks Drive is the organization’s first center focused solely on cosmetic procedures.

Los Altos’ newest medical office – the...

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Books

Book Signings

• Fritz and Nomi Trapnell have scheduled a book-signing party 4-6 p.m. Aug. 1 at their home, 648 University Ave., Los Altos.

Fritz and his daughter, Dana Tibbitts, co-authored “Harnessing the Sky: Frederick ‘Trap’ Trapnell, ...

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People

GRACE WILSON FRANKS

GRACE WILSON FRANKS

Resident of Los Altos

Grace Wilson Franks, our beloved mother and grandmother, left us peacefully on July 16, 2015 just a few weeks short of her 92nd birthday. She was born to Ross and Florence (Cruzan) Wilson in rural Tulare, California on Septem...

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Travel

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories


Eren Göknar/Special to the Town Crier
San Francisco-based humangear Inc. sells totes, tubes and tubs for traveling.

In travel, as in romance, it’s the little things that count.

Beyond the glossy brochures lie the travel discomforts too mun...

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Stepping Out

Engineer builds second career as actor

Engineer builds second career as actor


David Allen/Special to the Town Crier
Actors rehearse for Foothill Music Theatre’s “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum.” The cast includes, from left, Tomas Theriot, Todd Wright, Mike Meadors and Ray D’Ambrosio. ...

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Spiritual Life

Christ Episcopal pastor departs Los Altos for new post in SF

Christ Episcopal pastor departs Los Altos for new post in SF


Courtesy of Sara BoaDwee
Christ Episcopal Church celebrated the ministry of the Rev. Dr. Malcolm Young and his wife, Heidi, at a farewell luau June 28.

Members and friends of Christ Episcopal Church bid farewell June 28 to the Rev. Dr. Malcolm C. Yo...

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Magazine

Inside Mountain View

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
NASA Ames’ Pluto Flyover event kindles the imaginations of young attendees.

Sue Moore watched the July 20, 1969, moon landing beside patients and staff members of the San Francisco hospital where she worked as a nurse...

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LAHS teacher captures history in quick reads


In the spring of 1970, when the violent protests at Kent State University over the Vietnam War erupted, I was a freshman in college. I tried to piece together why we got into fighting this poor nation half a world away based on the constant reports of casualties and atrocities and the flood of dissent. Could it be that our government was truly misleading us? Or maybe I was missing something important, like the opening scenes of a movie that others understood?

Robert Freeman, social studies teacher at Los Altos High School, recently wrote “The Vietnam War” (Kendall Lane Publishers, 2013), which has filled in my understanding of this great tragedy. He breaks the war’s history into five stages spanning the French colonial period in the 1940s to the fall of Saigon in 1975. He analyzes how U.S. motivations changed over this period and how political failures at home intertwined with failures in the war strategy to produce the first war America lost. The final chapter describes how Vietnam allowed our nation to lose its moral stature in the world.

“The Vietnam War” is part of Freeman’s “The Best One-Hour History” series on key turning points in Western civilization. The books are available at Amazon.com for the cost of a latte and are meant to be read in one sitting in print or e-book format. In addition to “The Vietnam War,” the series includes “World War I,” “The French Revolution,” “The Protestant Reformation,” “The Renaissance” and “The Scientific Revolution.”

Freeman hit his mark in reaching people like me, who want to better understand the history behind current world problems but can’t commit to a lengthy book. His clear and compelling writing gave me the insight I was hoping for into U.S. foreign policy.

Freeman got the idea for the series after finding that his Advanced Placement History students were not engaging with the textbook. To grab their interest, he started writing summaries on important periods in history. His classes moved up to the top of the nation with their AP test scores, and parents requested copies of the summaries for their own reading.

The series, like the summaries, are heavy on analysis. Rather than overwhelming the reader with dates and names, Freeman takes a big-picture perspective that reveals his training in economics. Before teaching, Freeman was an international marketing executive. He earned a master’s degree in business administration from Stanford University.

The second volume, “World War I,” riveted me from the start: “The impact of World War I was so great, it is considered by many historians as the most significant event of the last thousand years.” Yet, I confess, I never understood the significance of the murder of the heir to the Austrian throne, Archduke Franz Ferdinand, at the hand of a 19-year-old Balkan nationalist. How did it draw, within a few short weeks, Germany, England, France, Russia, their colonies and much of the rest of the world into war?

With the aid of a simple map, Freeman explains how the assassination set off a fire keg of alliances and nationalist yearnings that stretched from Europe to the Middle East. He effectively outlines how the destruction of the Ottoman Empire, along with the Austro-Hungarian, Romanov and Hohenzollern empires led to the inauguration of communism, 11 new countries, a proliferation of oppressive dictatorships, the elevation of the U.S. to a position of pre-eminent world power, the 1990s wars in Serbia and Croatia, and more. And he does it in 50 very readable pages.

After that small investment in time and money, I am reading the international news with a deeper interest. I feel that I have finally learned the backstory to many of the tensions in Asia, the Middle East and Africa that have dominated my adult life.

Next, I plan to read “The Protestant Reformation” – the change in philosophy that set the seeds for the modern era, with the posting of the 97 Theses on a church door on Halloween in 1517. I can’t wait.

Terese Tricamo is a longtime Los Altos resident.

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