Sun04202014

News

City chips in $7,000 for SFMOMA installation

City chips in $7,000 for SFMOMA installation


Town Crier File Photo
The Los Altos City Council earmarked $7,000 for the purchase of Chris Johanson’s artwork.

The city of Los Altos will contribute $7,000 toward the purchase of a $28,000 art installation featured in the San Francisco Museum...

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Schools

LASD students celebrate service learning

LASD students celebrate service learning


Courtesy of Sandra McGonagle
We Day, held March 26 at Oracle Arena in Oakland, exhorts students in the Los Altos School District to effect positive change.

More than 150 Los Altos School District student leaders joined 16,000 Bay Area students to ce...

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Community

Film career launches with Cannes screening

Film career launches with Cannes screening


Courtesy of Zachary Ready
Los Altos native Zachary Ready, front left, and co-director Andrew Cathey, right, celebrate their Campus MovieFest awards.

After learning the art of filmmaking as a child in the front yard of his family’s Los Altos home...

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Sports

Sports on the Side

Pathways Run/Walk slated May 10 in Hills

The 13th annual Pathways Run/Walk is scheduled 9 a.m. May 10 at Westwind Community Barn, 27210 Altamont Road, Los Altos Hills. The course wends through Byrne Preserve and onto the Los Altos Hills Pathways sys...

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Comment

Now is the time to expand parking: Editorial

Just a few short years ago, vacancies dotted downtown Los Altos. Property owners had a hard time attracting businesses because there was a shortage of customers. That is no longer true. Now, the cry is: Where are my customers going to park?

The city...

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Special Sections

Epicurean's Mary Clark Bartlett: Serving sustainability

Epicurean's Mary Clark Bartlett: Serving sustainability


Courtesy of Michael McTighe
Mary Clark Bartlett is founder and CEO of Los Altos-based Epicurean Group.

Labels such as “healthy,” “organic” and “green” are rarely used to describe the meals served in most corporate cafes in Silicon Valley. But on...

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Business

Local realtor honored for volunteer efforts

Local realtor honored for volunteer efforts


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Coldwell Banker recently recognized realtor Kim Copher, right, for her philanthropic efforts. Copher and colleague Alan Russell, left, volunteer at Reach Potential Movement, where they collect books for its Bookshelf in ...

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Books

Local Author Spotlight

In an effort to support authors from Los Altos, Los Altos Hills and Mountain View, many self-published, Book Buzz periodically spotlights their books and offers information on where to purchase them. Local authors are encouraged to submit brief summa...

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People

Noteworthy

RotaCare honors local volunteer

RotaCare Bay Area honored Jim Cochran of the RotaCare Mountain View Free Medical Clinic with the Outstanding Clinic Volunteer Award April 10 for his commitment to RotaCare’s mission of providing free medical care to t...

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Travel

Sausalito: Explore the historical city with world-class views

Sausalito: Explore the historical city with world-class views


Eren Göknar/ Special to the Town Crier
Sausalito offers panoramic views of the San Francisco Bay. A number of companies schedule boat tours that sail past Angel Island and Alcatraz.

On a clear day, Sausalito offers spectacular views of the San Franc...

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Stepping Out

Western Ballet performs this weekend  at Smithwick Theatre in Los Altos Hills

Western Ballet performs this weekend at Smithwick Theatre in Los Altos Hills


Courtesy of Alexi Zubiria
Western Ballet’s “La Fille Mal Gardée” features Alison Share and Maykel Solas. The production runs Friday and Saturday at Foothill College

Western Ballet is slated to perform “La Fille Mal GardéeR...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

A yoga class a day keeps the stress away

A yoga class a day keeps the stress away


Van Houtte/Town Crier Yoga of Los Altos hosts a variety of classes, including Strong Flow Vinyasa, above, taught by Doron Hanoch. Yin Yoga instructor Janya Wongsopa guides a student in the practice, below.

It’s nearly 9 a.m. on a Monday mornin...

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LAHS teacher captures history in quick reads


In the spring of 1970, when the violent protests at Kent State University over the Vietnam War erupted, I was a freshman in college. I tried to piece together why we got into fighting this poor nation half a world away based on the constant reports of casualties and atrocities and the flood of dissent. Could it be that our government was truly misleading us? Or maybe I was missing something important, like the opening scenes of a movie that others understood?

Robert Freeman, social studies teacher at Los Altos High School, recently wrote “The Vietnam War” (Kendall Lane Publishers, 2013), which has filled in my understanding of this great tragedy. He breaks the war’s history into five stages spanning the French colonial period in the 1940s to the fall of Saigon in 1975. He analyzes how U.S. motivations changed over this period and how political failures at home intertwined with failures in the war strategy to produce the first war America lost. The final chapter describes how Vietnam allowed our nation to lose its moral stature in the world.

“The Vietnam War” is part of Freeman’s “The Best One-Hour History” series on key turning points in Western civilization. The books are available at Amazon.com for the cost of a latte and are meant to be read in one sitting in print or e-book format. In addition to “The Vietnam War,” the series includes “World War I,” “The French Revolution,” “The Protestant Reformation,” “The Renaissance” and “The Scientific Revolution.”

Freeman hit his mark in reaching people like me, who want to better understand the history behind current world problems but can’t commit to a lengthy book. His clear and compelling writing gave me the insight I was hoping for into U.S. foreign policy.

Freeman got the idea for the series after finding that his Advanced Placement History students were not engaging with the textbook. To grab their interest, he started writing summaries on important periods in history. His classes moved up to the top of the nation with their AP test scores, and parents requested copies of the summaries for their own reading.

The series, like the summaries, are heavy on analysis. Rather than overwhelming the reader with dates and names, Freeman takes a big-picture perspective that reveals his training in economics. Before teaching, Freeman was an international marketing executive. He earned a master’s degree in business administration from Stanford University.

The second volume, “World War I,” riveted me from the start: “The impact of World War I was so great, it is considered by many historians as the most significant event of the last thousand years.” Yet, I confess, I never understood the significance of the murder of the heir to the Austrian throne, Archduke Franz Ferdinand, at the hand of a 19-year-old Balkan nationalist. How did it draw, within a few short weeks, Germany, England, France, Russia, their colonies and much of the rest of the world into war?

With the aid of a simple map, Freeman explains how the assassination set off a fire keg of alliances and nationalist yearnings that stretched from Europe to the Middle East. He effectively outlines how the destruction of the Ottoman Empire, along with the Austro-Hungarian, Romanov and Hohenzollern empires led to the inauguration of communism, 11 new countries, a proliferation of oppressive dictatorships, the elevation of the U.S. to a position of pre-eminent world power, the 1990s wars in Serbia and Croatia, and more. And he does it in 50 very readable pages.

After that small investment in time and money, I am reading the international news with a deeper interest. I feel that I have finally learned the backstory to many of the tensions in Asia, the Middle East and Africa that have dominated my adult life.

Next, I plan to read “The Protestant Reformation” – the change in philosophy that set the seeds for the modern era, with the posting of the 97 Theses on a church door on Halloween in 1517. I can’t wait.

Terese Tricamo is a longtime Los Altos resident.

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