Mon05042015

News

Street crack-sealing project begins Monday, May 4

The City of Los Altos is beginning a city-wide street crack-sealing project on Monday (May 4).

City officials said the traffic impact for this project will be minimal. No streets will be closed and vehicles can resume normal traffic flow shortly aft...

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Schools

Homestead students use projects  to solve environmental problems

Homestead students use projects to solve environmental problems


Alisha Parikh/Special to the Town Crier
Homestead High School junior Maya Dhar, a Los Altos resident, left, and classmate Carolyn MacDonald support the school’s AP Environmental Science classes at the Arbor Day Festival April 23.

As summer app...

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Community

CHAC appoints new leader

CHAC appoints new leader

Naomi Nakano-Matsumoto, LCSW, has been named the new executive director of the Community Health Awareness Council (CHAC). A seasoned nonprofit leader, Nakano-Matsumoto is scheduled to assume duties July 1. She takes over for outgoing executive direct...

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Sports

St. Francis swimmers shine

St. Francis swimmers shine


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
St. Francis High’s Benjamin Ho competes against Sacred Heart Cathedral Thursday. The junior swam on all three victorious relays at the home meet, which the Lancers won easily.

Flexing its power in the pool, host St....

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Comment

Halsey House deserves preservation: Other Voices

Halsey House deserves preservation: Other Voices


Many contributing supporters to the Friends of Historic Redwood Grove believe that the Halsey House, designated a historic landmark by the Los Altos City Council in 1981, deserves to be saved and renovated for adapted use by the community.

Set in ...

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Special Sections

Sneaky shots: A photographer’s guide to capturing the proposal

Sneaky shots: A photographer’s guide to capturing the proposal


Elliott Burr/Special to the Town Crier
A stealthy photographer scouts locations ahead of time to find not just a place to perch, but also the ideal position for the subjects.

It’s showtime.

You’re about to ask the person in front of...

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Business

Pharmaca celebrates grand opening over weekend

Pharmaca celebrates grand opening over weekend


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Pharmaca is coming to 400 Main St. with a grand-opening celebration scheduled Saturday and Sunday.

If natural health and beauty products are your cup of tea, expect to find them – and hot tea – this weekend at the gran...

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Books

People

JANE BUTTERFIELD PRINGLE LYND

JANE BUTTERFIELD PRINGLE LYND

October 30, 1924 - April 8, 2015

Jane Butterfield Pringle Lynd, daughter to Liebert and Elise Butterfield of San Francisco, passed away quietly at her home in Palo Alto surrounded by her family, following a short illness. Jane was a proud third ge...

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Travel

Cuba libre: Local residents join mad rush of travelers

Cuba libre: Local residents join mad rush of travelers


Natalie Elefant/Special to the Town Crier
Los Altos resident Natalie Elefant noted the vibrant street performances as a traveler in Cuba.

The U.S. restored diplomatic relations with Cuba late last year, enabling Americans to import $100 worth of cig...

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Stepping Out

'Birds' landing in Mtn. View

'Birds' landing in Mtn. View


Ray Renati/Special to the Town Crier
The Pear Avenue Theatre production of Paul Braverman’s “Birds of a Feather” stars Troy Johnson as mafia boss Sean Kineen, left, and Diane Tasca as private eye Frankie Payne.

Pear Avenue Theatre’s world premi...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

Practice prudent pruning: Maintaining manzanita, ceanothus and toyon

Practice prudent pruning: Maintaining manzanita, ceanothus and toyon


tanya kucak/Special to the Town Crier
Shrub manzanitas are known for their sinuous mahogany trunks and branches. If the foliage hides the bark, prune selectively to open the center so that the bark is visible year-round. This Montara manzanita is ...

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Inside Mountain View

Up to the challenge: Local leaders unite to help at-risk youth

Up to the challenge: Local leaders unite to help at-risk youth


Courtesy of Challenge Team
Jeanette Freiberg, bottom of pile, has fun with family members. The Challenge Team named Freiberg, a student at Mountain View High School, its 2015 Youth Champion.

There’s an ongoing joke among members of the Challenge...

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A tale of two sisters: Local residents chronicle wartime experiences


Courtesy of the Wortz Family
Growing up in North Carolina, little did sisters Eleanor and Jean Thompson know that they would one day document their trailblazing.

Sisters Eleanor and Jean Thompson eventually settled in the South Bay, but their roadmaps to retirement took many twists and turns.

Eleanor and Jean grew up in the 1930s in the small town of Spencer, N.C., noted for its tree-lined streets and friendly atmosphere, with their brother Julian. Jean, five years younger than Eleanor, remembers feeling that her siblings thought she was “a pain in the neck,” the tagalong. But she is quick to explain that she always looked up to and loved them.

Eleanor’s life seemed interesting and exciting to Jean. Eleanor’s strong independent spirit motivated her to earn a pilot’s license, unusual for a female in the 1940s. When the opportunity arose, she joined the WASP (Women’s Airforce Service Pilots), the first women in history to pilot military airplanes.

One summer, when Eleanor was stationed at Love Field in Texas, Jean stayed in the nearby town and became the chauffeur for the flying WASP, driving her sister and others back and forth to the field for their flights, giving her a sense of being part of the corps.

Jean followed the family tradition and attended Spencer High School and Catawba College for two years, but then showed her blossoming independence by matriculating at the University of North Carolina, the first in her family to go away to college. She became a “Government Girl” stationed in Washington, D.C., San Francisco and London.

Jean married Col. Thomas M. “Mac” Barrick. The career Army officer and World War II veteran was deployed to the Korean War five weeks after the wedding. Jean and eventually their children, Carol and Thomas McClellan Barrick Jr., moved 18 times in 23 years, living in Europe and Asia as Mac’s postings dictated.

When Mac retired in 1976, the family headed west, where Eleanor, her husband James Howard Wortz and their children had settled in Los Altos after World War II.

Separated for decades by wars, careers and marriages, the sisters reunited on the opposite side of the country – in Silicon Valley. They renewed their closeness as they shared events at the Woodland Vista Swim & Racquet Club in Los Altos, which Eleanor had organized and served as first president. The families gathered often and their children and now grandchildren became good friends instead of distant relatives.

Retirement, however, didn’t mean R&R for the Barricks, new Bay Area residents. They plunged into local activities, such as spearheading the successful citizens’ campaign to save the Heritage Orchard in Saratoga. Among her many community projects, Jean served as Green Circle facilitator for the Santa Clara County elementary schools, promoting diversity, tolerance and conflict resolution.

Lasting legacy

Encouraged to chronicle her unique experiences as one of the few women pilots in World War II, Eleanor began a book on the WASP. She found direction in the Mountain View Los Altos Adult Education Memoirs Writing Class at Hillview Community Center. In turn, as of old, it was the older sister who motivated Jean to join the class and record her interesting travels after leaving Spencer as a family history for their children and grandchildren.

Together after many decades, their roles gradually switched. It was Jean, the younger sister, who published her book first, “Tracks Out of Spencer: An Army Wife Remembers” (Xlibris Corp., 2004). It chronicles her “escape” from the small town to experience the international journeys of a military family.

Then Jean began to take the initiative for Eleanor. Although the WASP received many verbal accolades at the end of World War II, the U.S. government didn’t award the female pilots Congressional Gold Medals until 2010. Jean encouraged and enabled Eleanor to attend the local presentation in Los Gatos to accept her deserved recognition.

Experienced with the delays and minutia of finishing and publishing a book, Jean recognized that Eleanor was getting weaker and finding it more difficult to tie up her fascinating memoir. The little sister who always looked up to her older sister showed the same determination and command her sister had taught her.

Jean worked tirelessly to ensure that Eleanor would complete her book, “Fly Gals of World War II: Women Airforce Service Pilots” (Robertson Publishing, 2011), in time to enjoy the excitement and interest in the book. Eleanor died Aug. 18 at her home in Los Altos at the age of 92.

The sisters, who grew up during the Great Depression in a small southern railroad town, unused to seeing women work outside the home, showed their strong characters when the opportunities rose for each of them: fearless, determined, hardworking, successful and loyal to each other.

Los Altos resident Joan Garvin is enrolled in the Mountain View Los Altos Adult Education Memoirs Writing Class.

Are you a senior with a story to tell? Do you know a senior whose story would make an interesting subject for a profile? Email Bruce Barton at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

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