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News

Foothill to offer four-year degree: Foothill aims to launch dental hygiene degree in fall 2016

Foothill to offer four-year degree: Foothill aims to launch dental hygiene degree in fall 2016


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Students enrolled in Foothill College’s two-year dental hygiene program, above, can soon earn a four-year bachelor’s degree for approximately $10,000.

Foothill-De Anza Community College District Chancellor Linda M. Th...

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Schools

Freestyle hosts exhibition at Computer Science Museum

Freestyle hosts exhibition at Computer Science Museum


Traci Newell/Town Crier
Mountain View High junior and Freestyle Academy student Radika Gupta, right, works with a fellow student during a WebAudio course this month.

For three periods a day, a small subset of students from Los Altos and Mountain Vi...

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Community

Museum explores Stanford, Valley connection

Museum explores Stanford, Valley connection


Courtesy of Julie Rose
The Los Altos History Museum’s “Symbiotic Superstars” event drew a crowd including, from left, “The Lure & the Legends” creator Nan Geschke, Stanford President John L. Hennessy, historian Leslie Berlin and Adobe Systems c...

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Comment

Good compromise on PE exemptions: Editorial

While “Deflategate” captures the national sports headlines, the local issue of physical education class exemptions for freshmen seems a much worthier sports topic for discussion.

The Mountain View Los Altos Union High School District Board of Truste...

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Special Sections

Your Home Brief

Filoli hosts bird exhibition

Filoli kicks off the 2015 season of art exhibitions in its Visitor and Education Center with “The Birds of America: Audubon Collection,” a selection of prints from Filoli’s Permanent Collection, Feb. 10...

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Business

Wine & beer lounge coming to First Street

Wine & beer lounge coming to First Street


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
The new wine and beer lounge Honcho heads to First Street, with a spring opening anticipated.

A cocktail lounge proposed for First Street has cleared its first hurdle – the Los Altos Planning and Transportation Comm...

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Books

"Fearless Genius" photos chart Silicon Valleys brain trust


Not every book needs pages and pages of words to tell a story – some do it through pictures.

“Fearless Genius: The Digital Revolution in Silicon Valley, 1985-2000” (Atria Books, 2014) by Doug Menuez features more than 100 photographs Menuez to...

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People

RUBY DOSHIM LAI

Ruby Doshim Lai was born on July 26, 1929 and passed away at home on January 10, 2015. A resident of Los Altos for over 50 years, Ruby is survived by her husband Bill; children Gwen, Tracy and Allyn; and grandchildren Kiyoshi and Misa.

Born on Mott ...

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Travel

Cuban photographer slated to appear at Foothill

Cuban photographer slated to appear at Foothill


Courtesy of Raúl Cañibano
Cuban photographer Raúl Cañibano is set to appear at Foothill College tonight. His work – including the image “Series: Guajira’s Land, Viñales, 2007,” right – is on display at the KCI Gallery t...

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Stepping Out

'Betrayal' at Pear

'Betrayal' at Pear


Ray Renati/Special to the Town Crier
The cast of Pear Avenue Theatre’s “Betrayal” includes Maryssa Wanlass, from left, Fred Pitts and William J. Brown III.

The Pear Avenue Theatre presents Harold Pinter’s investigation of modern relationships, “...

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Magazine

Tracing history on foot: Hidden Villa’s long hike

Tracing history on foot: Hidden Villa’s long hike


Campers on Hidden Villa’s Sierra Backpacking Trip study historical photos to measure how the land has changed and alternate serving as student leaders who guide the route of their three-week trek.

Amid the high-tech camps and programs of a Bay Area ...

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Follow these tips to avoid new scams targeting seniors

While most people were taught to use good manners when answering the telephone, not everyone who calls you necessarily has good intentions.

According to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, a recent spate of lottery scams and advance-fee frauds originating in Jamaica are targeting seniors and other Americans via telephone.

While the Jamaican and U.S. governments have teamed to tighten laws and combat the problem, it is important to guard against becoming the next victim.

Knowing the difference between legitimate telemarketers and scammers is crucial. Protect yourself by taking the following precautions.

• Never pay money to collect supposed sweepstakes winnings. Legitimate operations won’t require you to pay to collect winnings. It’s against U.S. law to play foreign lotteries. If you get a call saying you’ve won one, it’s probably a scam.

• Never wire money to anyone you don’t know.

• Ignore unsolicited calls from anyone, even charities and companies with whom you already do business. You have no way to confirm whether the caller is legitimate. Even caller ID can be faked. When in doubt, just hang up.

• Place your telephone number on the National Do Not Call Registry. It’s fast and free. Visit DoNotCall.gov or add your number to the registry by calling (888) 382-1222 from the phone you wish to register.

• Check unfamiliar area codes before returning calls. Be aware that there are many three-digit area codes that connect callers to international telephone numbers.

• If you don’t make international calls, ask your telephone provider to block incoming and outgoing international calls.

• Never provide anyone with personal information, such as bank accounts, PIN numbers or Social Security numbers.

• Prevent criminals from accessing your money. Contact your bank, brokerages and the Social Security Administration to add a password to your accounts.

• If callers insist on speaking with you, tell them that you’ll call them directly. Don’t take a number offered by a potential fraudster. You’re safer looking up the number independently.

• Scammers often create false deadlines. If you feel pressured, hang up. You’ve spent a lifetime earning your money. You deserve time to choose how to spend it.

• Help others from falling victim to scammers by warning friends and family. If you’ve received a call, mail or email you think might be from a scammer, contact local authorities or report it to the Federal Trade Commission by calling (877) 382-4357.

“The Jamaican government is resolved to successfully combat this scourge,” said Peter Bunting, Jamaica’s minister of national security, who is collaborating with U.S. officials to stop new Jamaican lottery scams. “We have put in place both legislative and operational measures that will ensure that persons who prey on vulnerable seniors are held accountable.”

You don’t have to live in fear to avoid being a victim. By becoming informed of the latest tactics used by scammers to defraud consumers, you can protect yourself and your finances.

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