Sun02072016

News

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds


Graphic Courtesy of City of Mountain View
The purple parking lots above indicate where paid parking for the Super Bowl is allowed in downtown Mountain View. Other lots are open but still carry three-hour time constraints.

Downtown Mountain View wil...

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Schools

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school


Courtesy of Christine Lenz
Los Altos High junior Riley Fujioka, left, works with Animal Assisted Happiness program manager Simone Haroush-van Dam.

Research affirms that the therapeutic effects of animals help reduce stress in humans, and one Los Alt...

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Community

Sports

Panthers outpace Priory

Panthers outpace Priory


Shirley Pefley/Special to the Town Crier
Pinewood’s Matt Peery lays up the ball in Friday’s win over Woodside Priory. Peery paced the Panthers with 19 points.

While height helps, the Pinewood School boys are proof that basketball is not ...

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Comment

From the City Manager's Desk: Fulfilling our mission

 

For those of us who work for Los Altos, the mission is “to foster and maintain the city of Los Altos as a great place to live and to raise a family.” The city’s employees take this mission seriously and – individually ...

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Special Sections

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl


Photos Courtesy of Blanche Shaheen
Blanche Shaheen, above with her brother Issa, shares her Middle Eastern take on nachos – ideal for a Super Bowl party. Shaheen’s “Machos,” right, feature feta, tahini sauce, Persian cucumbe...

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Business

Businesses on Main Street make moves

Businesses on Main Street make moves


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Several stores on Main Street in downtown Los Altos are in the midst of changing hands.

In the coming months, Main Street will welcome several new businesses to fill empty storefronts.

Jennifer Quinn, the city’s econo...

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People

ROSEMARY FRASER

Rosemary Fraser, age 81, a long-time resident of the Los Altos/Palo Alto area, died peacefully Friday, the 22nd of January at her home. It was a sudden death; hypertension was the underlying cause.

Born in 1934 in Florence, Arizona, Rosemary enjoyed...

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Stepping Out

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'


Otak Jump/Special to the Town Crier
Olga Chernisheva and Silas Elash perform in West Bay Opera’s “Eugene Onegin.”

The West Bay Opera production of “Eugene Onegin” is scheduled Feb. 19-28 at Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305...

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Spiritual Life

How to cultivate childlike faith in a grown-up world

And Jesus said: “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.”

– Matt. 18:3

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Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

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Sunday Friends: Earning through learning


courtesy of Sunday Friends
Children from low-income families combine education, self-sufficiency and fun at Sunday Friends.

Ali Barekat, executive director of Sunday Friends, beams with pride when he speaks about the positive impact his organization has made on low-income families in San Jose.

He can tell story after story about children and parents who have not only bettered themselves but helped others by joining Sunday Friends, which is unlike any other charitable organization in the country. There are no handouts here; participants earn tickets redeemable for items at its on-site store – from toys to toiletries – for taking classes and working on community service projects each Sunday.

Barekat recalled a recent encounter with 8-year-old Jose, who was asked what he planned to do with his pile of tickets.

“I have earned enough tickets to buy my own school supplies for this year,” Jose said. “Now I’m trying to earn more tickets to go buy more school supplies to bring to my teacher to give to the kids that don’t have them.”

Barekat pointed out that Jose – who began attending Sunday Friends programs with his family two years ago – has grasped one of the most valuable lessons that his staff and volunteers try to instill in the nearly 100 children they serve every week.

“He’s not just caring for himself – now he’s caring for others and worrying about how he can help someone else,” Barekat said. “It’s a testament to what we do and why it works. It brings a value system to these kids that many of them weren’t exposed to before.”

Their parents can also benefit from these activities and classes, which run noon to 7 p.m. Sundays on a rotating basis at Lowell and Anne Darling elementary schools in San Jose. Offerings promote healthy lifestyles, English proficiency, life skills and computer education – new this year.

“The computer classes started in January, and we’ve been overwhelmed by the reception we’ve received,” Barekat said. “I feel like these families need to see the value of a computer in their lives. They can get jobs, find bargains and interact with their kids’ schoolteachers through a computer. It can help them break the cycle of poverty.”

He is hopeful that another addition to the program contributes to this cause as well.

“At the beginning of the year, we will have a real bank stationed at our program,” said Barekat, who convinced a major credit union with ATMs at Walmart and Costco stores to work with Sunday Friends. “There’s going to be a computer, and families will bring their paychecks and deposit them into the bank right away. This bank is not going to charge them for cashing them; right now they pay 1 percent to those check-cashing places.”

He added that families would have the opportunity to sit down with a bank representative for a free financial consultation and learn such things as how to apply for a student loan or a credit card with a $300 limit instead of a high-interest payday advance.

“It’s a way to help low-income families and remove their fear of the banking system,” Barekat said. “We have taught them about financial literacy through our ticket system, which allows them to earn 2 percent every month on the tickets they’ve saved, and this is a good transition to using a real bank.”

For more information, visit sundayfriends.org.

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