Mon01262015

Schools

MVLA revisits prospect of ninth-grade PE exemptions

MVLA revisits prospect of ninth-grade PE exemptions


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
The Mountain View Los Altos Union High School District Board of Trustees is scheduled to vote on a proposal to exempt ninth-grade student-athletes from taking PE. Students take part in a physical education class at Mount...

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Community

Midnight Express offers late-night rides from SF

Midnight Express offers late-night rides from SF


From Midnight Express Instagram
A group of millennial-aged Santas celebrating a night on the town prepare for a safe ride from San Francisco to their South Bay homes, courtesy of Cory Althoff’s new Midnight Express shuttle.

It’s no understatemen...

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Comment

More open than ever: Editorial

One of the Los Altos City Council’s objectives for 2015 is implementing an open-government policy. The title of the policy may be somewhat misleading, because it’s not as if the city has had a closed-government policy. But the new proposal goes beyon...

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Business

Cassidy Turley, DTZ plan to combine

Cassidy Turley, DTZ plan to combine


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Cassidy Turley, which has offices at 339 S. San Antonio Road, is combining with DTZ following its recent acquisition.

Commercial real estate services companies DTZ and Cassidy Turley have joined forces to operate as a sin...

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Books

Gawande's

Gawande's "Being Mortal" proves an important book on aging


Books about death and dying are usually not on my list of “must reads.”

I couldn’t resist, however, the best-selling “Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End” (Metropolitan Books, 2014) by Atul Gawande.

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People

JUDY HOFFMANN

JUDY HOFFMANN

Judy Hoffmann passed away unexpectedly October 17, 2014 in New York City. It was only fitting Judy would be traveling and enjoying special adventures in so many different places until the very end.

Judy has lived since 1969 in Los Altos with her h...

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Travel

Cuban photographer slated to appear at Foothill

Cuban photographer slated to appear at Foothill


Courtesy of Raúl Cañibano
Cuban photographer Raúl Cañibano is set to appear at Foothill College tonight. His work – including the image “Series: Guajira’s Land, Viñales, 2007,” right – is on display at the KCI Gallery t...

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Stepping Out

TheatreWorks launches '2 Pianos' in Mtn. View

TheatreWorks launches '2 Pianos' in Mtn. View


Suellen Fitzsimmons/Special to the Town Crier
Christopher Tocco stars in TheatreWorks’ “2 Pianos 4 Hands,” which opened last week.

TheatreWorks’ production of “2 Pianos 4 Hands” is scheduled to run through Feb. 15 at the Mountain View Center fo...

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Spiritual Life

Start something great by ringing in the new year with prayer

There is a tradition, which I’m told originates in the Midwest, that calls for people to pray in the new year. A few years ago, I was invited to a friend’s house and a number of people stayed up until midnight (approximately two hours pa...

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Magazine

Christmas At Our House home tour celebrates 26 years

Christmas At Our House home tour celebrates 26 years


Courtesy of Christopher Stark
Homes on the St. Francis High School Women’s Club’s Christmas at Our House Holiday Home Tour showcase a variety of architectural styles.

The days grow short on sunshine but long on nostalgia as the holidays approach...

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Big prize escapes Los Altos family this year, but giant pumpkins still dazzle neighbors

10.13.2013 KassoPumpkinHaulingParty-7630b
Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
The gourd-y details: The Kasso family shows off its prize pumpkins to Covington School students.

As local youth scour farmstands to pick the perfect pumpkin to take home, they may think they’ve found the big one – that is, until they venture down Marvin Avenue in Los Altos to the Kasso house.

Pumpkin envy may set in as their jaws drop in awe at gourds so large they could fit the bill as Cinderella’s coach.

Growing big pumpkins – tipping the scale at 686 pounds this year – is a labor of love for Suzanne and Chris Kasso and their two children.

“We like to garden and we like to experiment, so growing big pumpkins is the best of both worlds,” Suzanne said. “We also like to tinker and troubleshoot and learn and grow. It sets a good example for the kids.”

At their fourth weigh-in at the Half Moon Bay Pumpkin Festival Oct. 14, the couple’s pumpkins were dwarfed by a 1,985-pounder, but they took home prizes in the the Most Beautiful category.

After their weigh-in, the family stopped by Covington School as it adjourned to let their children share their giant pumpkins and answer classmates’ questions.

The Kassos plant big pumpkins along the edge of their driveway, where neighbors stop to pose for photos in Halloween costumes and marvel at how large the giants are until Thanksgiving, when the family painstakingly harvests seeds and saws the pumpkins into smaller pieces for recycling in their compost pile. The family then feeds the soil that will birth next year’s pumpkins.

The Kassos said they didn’t really know what they were doing when they started their growing tradition nearly 10 years ago.

“We got a 60-pounder and thought, ‘Wow, this is the biggest one we’ve seen,’” said Suzanne of their initial attempt.

Shortly after, they enrolled in a class hosted by the Los Altos Hills Parks and Recreation Committee and realized that there was both a science and an art to growing big pumpkins. Simply popping a seed from any garden store into unprepared soil wouldn’t generate the magic needed to produce large pumpkins.

Prepping for pumpkins

The Kassos said their hobby requires year-round attention, starting from the day after they pluck the pumpkins from their vines.

“As soon as we move this guy out, we begin prepping for next year,” said Chris of what happens behind the scenes. “You can have good seeds, but if the soil isn’t good, it’s not going to grow.”

It’s not exactly a trade secret, but the family’s on-site compost pile of chicken and horse manure along with other organic waste is a critical element in their success. Starting in fall, they rototill and fertilize the ground where they grow their pumpkins to prepare the optimal bed.

Then the hard work begins. Germination of the subtropical plants poses challenges. The seeds must be started indoors and kept at a temperature of at least 90 F until they take root. Once the pumpkin plants are transplanted outdoors, vigilance is essential. Chris uses plant cages to protect the tender vegetation from little critters like squirrels. He and Suzanne spend time nearly every day during the early growing season digging trenches, as the plants’ vines seem to grow exponentially. By harvest, the pumpkins’ tentaclelike vines can extend more than 60 feet.

“Every year we learn something new,” Chris said. “Maybe by the time I retire, I’ll be able to grow one that’s 2,000 pounds.”


Kasso Family cultivates pumpkin prowress - Photos by Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier

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