Tue04152014

News

Late postal hours help last-minute filers

Late postal hours help last-minute filers

The crowd at Los Altos' post office wasn't epic when we checked today – but come tax day tomorrow (April 15) many locals may be lining up to file at the last minute.

Post offices in Los Altos and Mountain View stop collecting mail at 5 p.m. tomorr...

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Schools

Loyola School hosts STEM Expo

Loyola School hosts STEM Expo


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Ari Garabedia, above right, demonstrates his team’s project for curious classmates at Loyola School’s STEM Expo.

Some local schools are taking a different twist on the traditional science fair this year.

As a pilot p...

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Community

Chef Pépin to sign books in Los Altos

Chef Pépin to sign books in Los Altos

Master chef, author and educator Jacques Pépin is scheduled to make a personal appearance in Los Altos April 24. The “original Iron Chef” will be signing copies of his most recent books 3-5 p.m. at Main Street Café and Books, 134 Main St. The interna...

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Sports

Fruitful day on the Farm

Fruitful day on the Farm


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Los Altos High’s Brian Yeager soars in the triple jump at the Stanford Invitational Saturday.

Last weekend’s Stanford Invitational attracted the best high school track and field athletes in the region, including sever...

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Comment

The mysterious force in Los Altos: The Rockey Road

Shh ... it’s a secret. No it isn’t! I recently read a story in another paper asking if Google cash were behind the Los Altos downtown makeover and why. My first thought was, “Who cares?” We are an intelligent group in a small town where it is very di...

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Special Sections

Jewish food festival reaches beyond bagels

Who knew you could get a decent knish in Silicon Valley?

For at least one day, local foodies are gathering 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 27 at the Hazon Jewish Food Festival at the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center in Palo Alto to eat their way throug...

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Business

For the skin they're in : Shared interest in organic skin care leads duo to form company

For the skin they're in : Shared interest in organic skin care leads duo to form company


Ellie Van Houtte/town Crier
Nancy Newsom, left, and Kit Gordon started Botanic Organic in 2011 after they discovered a shared passion for creating organic, handmade skin-care products. The company now offers more than 15 products for adults and infa...

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Books

Local Author Spotlight

In an effort to support authors from Los Altos, Los Altos Hills and Mountain View, many self-published, Book Buzz periodically spotlights their books and offers information on where to purchase them. Local authors are encouraged to submit brief summa...

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People

Noteworthies

Noteworthies


Courtesy of Rob McCullough
The American Watercolor Society’s International Exhibition in New York features Jane McCullough’s “The End of the Game.”

Watercolor Society selects Los Altos artist’s work for display

The American Watercolor Society...

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Travel

Sausalito: Explore the historical city with world-class views

Sausalito: Explore the historical city with world-class views


Eren Göknar/ Special to the Town Crier
Sausalito offers panoramic views of the San Francisco Bay. A number of companies schedule boat tours that sail past Angel Island and Alcatraz.

On a clear day, Sausalito offers spectacular views of the San Franc...

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Stepping Out

LA Stage Company's 'Harold and Maude' opens this weekend at Bus Barn Theater

LA Stage Company's 'Harold and Maude' opens this weekend at Bus Barn Theater


courtesy of Los Altos Stage Company
Warren Wernick and Lillian Bogovich play the title characters in the Los Altos Stage Company production of “Harold and Maude.” The play runs through May 4.

The Los Altos Stage Company’s production of “Harold a...

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Spiritual Life

Silicon Valley Prayer Breakfast highlights matters of faith

Pat Gelsinger and Reggie Littlejohn come from different backgrounds and occupations, but both, guided by their Christian faith, have become leaders committed to helping others. The two shared their experiences at the 20th annual Silicon Valley Prayer...

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Magazine

A yoga class a day keeps the stress away

A yoga class a day keeps the stress away


Van Houtte/Town Crier Yoga of Los Altos hosts a variety of classes, including Strong Flow Vinyasa, above, taught by Doron Hanoch. Yin Yoga instructor Janya Wongsopa guides a student in the practice, below.

It’s nearly 9 a.m. on a Monday mornin...

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Burning Man renews sense of intimacy with the divine

This is the final article in a three-part series on Young’s experiences as a Christian pastor at Burning Man, the annual art festival and temporary community based on radical self-expression and self-reliance in the Black Rock Desert of Nevada.

At times, one could not help but wonder why we chose to go to Burning Man. We left loved ones behind only to be stuck in two of the worst traffic jams of our lives, waiting five hours to move one mile on our way in and out of Black Rock City.

The elevation, dust storms and extreme daytime heat wore everyone down. The wild colors and scenes overstimulated us. The action and the beat of the electronic music never stopped. Without enough water to bathe, 68,000 people lived practically on top of each other in a harsh desert of extremes.

Still, one could not help but feel a sense of elation on arriving. Signs along the roadside prepared us for the society we were entering. One said, “Finance is your religion.” Another quoted Arthur C. Clarke: “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.”

Together we were getting free from our shared religion of finance with a social technology that seemed like magic. For an entire week, no one tried to sell me anything, and no one talked about jobs or the economy. There were no phones, schedules, email messages, advertisements, brands or logos. The only things one could buy were coffee and ice. The pace of Silicon Valley makes it difficult for us to be generous with our time. Out there, it seemed we had infinite reservoirs of time and attention to share even with strangers.

What did I learn? Mystical experiences in the desert renewed my sense of intimacy with the divine. In the solitude of early morning, red slivers of cloud intersecting the rising sun made me feel like God was baptizing me in dust. Bicycling at sunset with the wind at my back flying past extraordinary artistic creations into the gray-water sky, this vast, mysterious universe seemed like a home for our peace, gratitude and love.

Most of the people I met were younger and helped me to see the world in a different way. I realized how sheltered and naive I am. Usually when I talk to people in their 20s, it is on my terms, in my world – and this constrains our conversation. At Burning Man, I got out of my suburban church box and met people who do not even really know what Christianity is, people whose motivations and most basic assumptions differ from my own. They deeply blessed me and helped me to appreciate our shared humanity.

Finally, perhaps it took getting out of my church sphere to discover what I have to offer to the world. The people I met showed me the value of being so deeply immersed in an ancient spiritual and intellectual tradition.

On one of my last nights, in the middle of a dust storm, I met a woman named Susan. She had sought God when she was young and had given up. We wondered whether everyone might know something about God, even if we use different religions and language to describe the source of meaning. Perhaps truth is the collection of ways that God is speaking to all of us.

In that conversation, I realized that churches offer ancient practices (prayer, service to others, the study of holy writings, music, various rituals, a calendar, aesthetic experiences, etc.) that help us to be drawn more deeply into the divine. At its best, church functions as a community and a technology for recognizing our place in the universe, for loving other people in the confidence and intimacy with God exemplified by Jesus.

Burning Man helped me to see that spiritual practices from the past have no value unless they can be connected to the concerns and aspirations of the present. Of any group in society, the churches I know should be speaking to exactly the people drawn to Burning Man. Their openness to the future, their divinely inspired creativity, their idealism in seeking to transform society so that it is fair and accepting and their spirit of generosity and concern for others is exactly what churches need.

The Rev. Malcolm C. Young, author of “The Spiritual Journal of Henry David Thoreau” (Mercer University Press, 2009), is on sabbatical from Christ Episcopal Church in Los Altos. For more information, visit ccla.us.

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