Sat02132016

News

SPLAT targets data, outreach as airplane noise continues

SPLAT targets data, outreach as airplane noise continues


Graphic courtesy of Don Gardner
Activists claim that a new SFO flight path leaves a “sound shadow” that impacts Los Altos and Los Altos Hills.

Sky Posse Los Altos Team – more simply known as SPLAT – seeks to squelch the noise...

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Schools

Los Altos High student-run charity plans '5 Gallon Gala'

Los Altos High student-run charity plans '5 Gallon Gala'


Courtesy of Lia Evard
Water by Youth members gave Egan students a chance to carry a 40-pound Jerry can, to see how difficult it is to obtain water in developing nations.

Water by Youth, a club at Los Altos High School, is making a splash by pla...

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Community

What would you do with a box of cookies? Local Girls Scouts help Tanzanian orphanage

What would you do with a box of cookies? Local Girls Scouts help Tanzanian orphanage


Courtesy of Alicia Madden
Sales of local Girl Scout cookies support service projects, such as funding an orphanage in the village of Mto wa Mbu in Tanzania.

Girl Scout cookies – whether you think of them as a treat, a tradition or a diet comp...

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Sports

Scoreless spells sink LA boys

Scoreless spells sink LA boys


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Los Altos High point guard Nolan Brennan attempts a shot in Friday’s game versus Palo Alto. He scored eight points in the loss.

There have been several games this season in which the Los Altos High boys basketball t...

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Comment

New 'York' values

New 'York' values


Hughes

 

As we have witnessed California suffer through one of its worst droughts in history over the past few years, all of us, I’m sure, have been keenly aware of our surroundings and have done a small part in trying to conserve wa...

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Special Sections

Getting a charge  out of the Volt

Getting a charge out of the Volt


Courtesy of Chevrolet
The 2016 Chevrolet Volt can be driven up to 50 miles on the power stored in its batteries.

Just five years ago, we wondered in this column what the power supply would be for the car of the future. Gasoline, diesel, electric ba...

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Business

Nearing V-Day: Shops stock sweets, treats

Nearing V-Day: Shops stock sweets, treats


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Los Altos resident Ella Roosakos, 11, with her mother, Gail, puzzles over which Gourmet Works sweets to buy as a valentine for Ella’s friend.

The gift-buying rush isn’t exclusive to Christmas. It may jump over...

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People

ALAN RODNEY MILLS

ALAN RODNEY MILLS

Alan Rodney Mills, PhD, 83, of Los Altos passed away peacefully on Saturday, January 30th, 2016. He was born in Rochdale, England in 1933 and came to California in 1962. He was a proud alumni of Manchester Grammar in England, University of Liverpoo...

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Stepping Out

PYT 'Gets Famous'

PYT 'Gets Famous'


Lyn Flaim Healy/Spotlight Moments Photography
Renee Vetter of Palo Alto, left, and Megan Foreman of Los Altos star in Peninsula Youth Theatre’s “Judy Moody Gets Famous.” Performances are scheduled Friday and Saturday.

Peninsula...

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Spiritual Life

A time to prepare: Fasting for Lent isn't limited to food

 

Today is Ash Wednesday, which in the Christian calendar marks the beginning of Lent – the 40 days of preparation for Resurrection Sunday, otherwise known as Easter.

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Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

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Sally Nogle: Trailblazing trainer


Courtesy of Sally Nogle
Sally Nogle has received several awards for her work as an athletic trainer at Michigan State.

Sally Nogle said she doesn’t consider herself a pioneer, though there’s plenty of evidence to the contrary.

In her 30 years as an athletic trainer at Michigan State University, the Mountain View native has earned promotions no other woman working for the school – or in the Big Ten Conference – has achieved.

Nogle was the first female athletic trainer for a football team in the conference and in July was elevated to MSU’s head athletic trainer – another first for the Big Ten. A year ago, she was the 12th woman inducted into the National Athletic Trainers’ Association Hall of Fame.

Nogle (nee Eaves) attended Springer and Covington schools before graduating from Awalt High (now Mountain View) in 1975. She earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees from San Diego State University and a doctorate from Michigan State. Married with two children, Nogle has been a certified athletic trainer for 32 years.

The Town Crier’s interview with Nogle follows.

TC: What drew you to the profession?

Nogle: My interest in health care and sports.

TC: Were you an athlete growing up? If so, what sports did you play?

Nogle: I played field hockey, volleyball, basketball and softball in high school. I also played volleyball and basketball for two years in college.

TC: What’s the best part of your job?

Nogle: The best part of my job is the people I work with: my co-workers, athletes, coaches, physicians and administrators. It is also very rewarding to work with athletes who are injured and see them return to the sport they excel in and enjoy.

TC: What’s the most difficult aspect of the job?

Nogle: The most difficult aspect is telling athletes they are injured severely enough that they cannot continue to play that season or sometimes ever again. The athletes have worked very hard toward their goals and to have one play shatter their dreams is very difficult for them to deal with.

TC: As head athletic trainer, how many sports do you serve at Michigan State?

Nogle: We have 25 sports at MSU – about 800 athletes.

TC: What’s a typical week like during the football season? And what’s game day like?

Nogle: The football season is a busy time, requiring me to work seven days a week. Mondays are the athletes’ day off from practice and lifting, so we do administrative duties and treatments all day. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday are practice days. We do evaluations and treatments all morning, tape ankles and do more treatments in the afternoon, go to team meetings and go to practice.

At practice we look at new injuries or help an athlete stretch, tape or brace an injury, then after practice we look at any new injuries and work with our doctors. I also meet with the coaches each day and provide them with an injury report and discuss with them what the injured athletes will be able to do or not do during practice.

Friday is mostly a treatment day, team meetings, and a walk-through practice. The night before a game we stay at a hotel, so we do treatments at the hotel.

On game day we do treatments again and start taping ankles about four to five hours prior to game time. We get to the stadium two hours before the game and tape more ankles and a lot of wrists and thumbs. … Once the game starts we are watching the field, so we can take care of any injuries that may occur. After the game we look at the new injuries and determine if they need ice, wraps, braces, X-rays, etc.

Then on Sunday we again evaluate injuries and do treatments along with covering an easy workout.

Every day we have doctors around in the morning and after practice who we work with, so we spend time taking vital signs, updating medical records and discussing the injury and treatment plan. There are many administrative duties that we work around treatments and practice coverage.

TC: What is the most common injury you see?

Nogle: Ankle sprains and muscle strains are the most common injuries we deal with.

TC: What’s your advice to athletes – from kids to weekend warriors to aspiring pros – when it comes to avoiding common injuries?

Nogle: To avoid injuries, a good core-strengthening program is important. Strength and endurance of the body parts used for the activity are important. A good program with a logical progression is the best way to prevent injuries.

TC: As the first female head trainer in the Big Ten and the 12th woman inducted into the National Athletic Trainers’ Association Hall of Fame, do you consider yourself a pioneer?

Nogle: I started in athletic training when the profession wasn’t that old and there were not that many women involved, so I do hope that my career has helped clear the path some for others to get to where they want to go. I have been blessed to have the opportunities that I have had because of my athletic training career, and I hope those who are just starting in the profession have more opportunities because of us older women in the field. So I do not call myself a “pioneer,” and I am very humbled when others say that I am.

TC: What was the Hall of Fame induction experience like?

Nogle: The Hall of Fame induction ceremony and Hall of Fame event schedule at our national convention was very special. At the actual induction ceremony, the thousands of athletic trainers who acknowledged me and the other inductees was incredible. The best part was the many members of my family who were there to support and celebrate with me.

TC: You’ve not only worked with athletes at Michigan State, but also Olympic athletes at the 1984 and 1988 Summer Games. What do you consider the highlight of your career?

Nogle: It is hard to pick one highlight. The Olympic games were definitely highlights. Going to the Rose Bowl was a highlight. And the inductions into the Michigan Athletic Trainer’s Society Hall of Fame and the National Athletic Trainer’s Hall of Fame are highlights.

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