Tue02092016

News

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds


Graphic Courtesy of City of Mountain View
The purple parking lots above indicate where paid parking for the Super Bowl is allowed in downtown Mountain View. Other lots are open but still carry three-hour time constraints.

Downtown Mountain View wil...

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Schools

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school


Courtesy of Christine Lenz
Los Altos High junior Riley Fujioka, left, works with Animal Assisted Happiness program manager Simone Haroush-van Dam.

Research affirms that the therapeutic effects of animals help reduce stress in humans, and one Los Alt...

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Community

Sports

Panthers outpace Priory

Panthers outpace Priory


Shirley Pefley/Special to the Town Crier
Pinewood’s Matt Peery lays up the ball in Friday’s win over Woodside Priory. Peery paced the Panthers with 19 points.

While height helps, the Pinewood School boys are proof that basketball is not ...

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Comment

From the City Manager's Desk: Fulfilling our mission

 

For those of us who work for Los Altos, the mission is “to foster and maintain the city of Los Altos as a great place to live and to raise a family.” The city’s employees take this mission seriously and – individually ...

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Special Sections

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl


Photos Courtesy of Blanche Shaheen
Blanche Shaheen, above with her brother Issa, shares her Middle Eastern take on nachos – ideal for a Super Bowl party. Shaheen’s “Machos,” right, feature feta, tahini sauce, Persian cucumbe...

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Business

Businesses on Main Street make moves

Businesses on Main Street make moves


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Several stores on Main Street in downtown Los Altos are in the midst of changing hands.

In the coming months, Main Street will welcome several new businesses to fill empty storefronts.

Jennifer Quinn, the city’s econo...

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People

ROSEMARY FRASER

Rosemary Fraser, age 81, a long-time resident of the Los Altos/Palo Alto area, died peacefully Friday, the 22nd of January at her home. It was a sudden death; hypertension was the underlying cause.

Born in 1934 in Florence, Arizona, Rosemary enjoyed...

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Stepping Out

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'


Otak Jump/Special to the Town Crier
Olga Chernisheva and Silas Elash perform in West Bay Opera’s “Eugene Onegin.”

The West Bay Opera production of “Eugene Onegin” is scheduled Feb. 19-28 at Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305...

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Spiritual Life

How to cultivate childlike faith in a grown-up world

And Jesus said: “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.”

– Matt. 18:3

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Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

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Native plants serve many practical uses


Tanya Kucak/Special to the Town Crier
Yarrow is a convenient and effective first-aid remedy found in the garden. Crush a leaf and apply it to any cut or scrape for quick relief. The native white and Island Pink varieties have the most medicinal value. You can also eat the young leaves in salads.

When I’m working in my garden late and the mosquitoes are biting, I usually rub an aromatic plant on my arms and face to minimize bites and keep welts from rising. For those times when I’m away from my garden, I recently learned how to make a simple bug spray using native plants.

At a talk sponsored by the Gardening with Natives group of the California Native Plant Society, Alicia Funk, an expert in plant-based medicine, said mugwort was an especially effective bug repellent. To make it, she fills a glass jar with the plants, pours boiling water over them and lets them steep overnight. In the morning, she strains the overnight infusion and puts it in a spray bottle. Other plants that can be added to the mixture include California Bay, Mountain Pennyroyal or Coyote Mint, Yerba Santa or manzanita.

I’m delighted to find this practical use for mugwort, because it’s a vigorous plant that needs to be pruned regularly to keep it within bounds.

For poison oak, Funk makes a spray using manzanita leaves in the same way: Fill a jar with manzanita leaves, pour boiling water over them, let the mixture steep overnight and strain. Put the liquid in a spray bottle for easy application. The astringency of the leaves dries rashes and is a very effective treatment, she said. Other plants that have been used to treat poison oak include mugwort, California Bay, Yerba Santa, acorn shells and Grindelia.

Did you notice that bay, manzanita and mugwort could be used in both formulas? One of the first things I noticed when I began studying herbs was that the same herbs seemed to be used for many different conditions, which made me think it was a scattershot approach. But as I learned more, I realized that this is a strength, because you can substitute what’s available. For first-aid uses, often all you need is a certain property. For an insect repellent, you need aromatics that repel bugs. For poison oak, you need something that calms the itching or that’s anti-inflammatory.

Funk’s household cleaner for the past four years is also an overnight infusion she makes from native plants. She uses California Bay leaves and the bright-green tips of Douglas Fir branches and adds distilled vinegar to the strained mixture. It’s an all-purpose spray she uses to clean wood floors and disinfect countertops.

"If you can boil water," Funk said, "you can make these useful concoctions."

Even her 5-year-old knows about yarrow. When someone has a minor injury, instead of getting a Band-Aid, he runs to the garden to get some yarrow leaves. Lightly crushed and applied to a cut or scrape, the leaves stop the bleeding and quickly reduce pain. The most effective varieties are the native white or Island Pink Yarrow.

Tanya Kucak gardens organically. Email her at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. n

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