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News

Burglary bump in LAH alarms residents and Sheriff's Office

Los Altos Hills has recorded fewer burglaries than the national and state averages over the past decade, but this year the number of breaking-and-entering crimes has spiked.

Since July 1, the Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Office has recorded 14 resid...

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Schools

Community support pays dividends

Community support pays dividends


As a recent cover story in The New York Times Magazine revealed, getting low-income students into college is not enough to close the achievement/income gap. The percentage of low-income students entering college who actually earn a degree lags far ...

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Community

War veteran to visit D.C. memorial on Honor Flight

War veteran to visit D.C. memorial on Honor Flight


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Los Altos resident and World War II vet Earl Pampeyan is preparing for an Honor Flight trip to Washington, D.C., next month.

Los Altos resident Earl Pampeyan is scheduled to fly to Washington, D.C., next month to vis...

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Sports

Making a splash

Making a splash


Courtesy of Clarke Weatherspoon
Stanford Water Polo Club’s under-14 boys team earned the bronze medal at the Junior Olympics. Front row, from left: Corey Tanis, Larsen Weigle, Nathan Puentes, Walker Seymour, Alan Viollier and Jayden Kunwar. B...

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Comment

Whom can you trust?: Haugh About That?

Waving my pink poodle skirt with all the fervor of a matador preparing to tease a raging bull, I blinked my 20-year-old eyes and gave a come-hither look to indicate, “I’m ready!” Little did I know that the blind trust I had in this ...

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Special Sections

Getting right by eating right: PAMF doctor's book addresses South Asian health risks

Getting right by eating right: PAMF doctor's book addresses South Asian health risks


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Dr. Ronesh Sinha, a physician at Palo Alto Medical Foundation, promotes healthful living among the South Asian population. His new book, “The South Asian Health Solution,” includes nutritious recipes.

When you think o...

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Business

From Google to First Street: Massage therapist sets up studio in downtown Los Altos

From Google to First Street: Massage therapist sets up studio in downtown Los Altos


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Upuia Ahkiong is slated to open Kua Body Studios next month at 106 First St. Ahkiong is sharing space with Evolve Classical Pilates.

A massage therapist with ties to Google Inc. is slated to open a new – and shared...

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Books

"Jack London" chronicles author's adventurous life


Much has been written about American author Jack London, primarily known for his early-20th-century Western adventure novels, including the classics “White Fang” and “The Call of the Wild.”

In Earle Labor’s biography of the literary icon, “Jac...

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People

TIMOTHY WARREN WATSON (TIM)

TIMOTHY WARREN WATSON (TIM)

Born June 2, 1935, died peacefully on August 11, at home in Mountain View, surrounded by his family. He died of complications of Parkinson’s Disease after a courageous 15-year battle.

Tim was the beloved husband of 55 years to his college sweethea...

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Travel

Bergama bound: A visit to newest World Heritage site

Bergama bound: A visit to newest World Heritage site


Photo Eren GÖknar/ Special to the Town Crier
The amphitheater in Turkey’s ancient city of Pergamon, now known as Bergama, overlooks the Bakirçay River valley, left. The city’s ruins also include the Temple of Trajan.

It was 90 F during t...

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Stepping Out

TheatreWorks offers 'Spoonful' of drama beginning this week

TheatreWorks offers 'Spoonful' of drama beginning this week


Kevin Berne/Special to the Town Crier
Three strangers – “Chutes & Ladders” (Anthony J. Haney, left), Odessa (Zilah Mendoza, center) and “Orangutan” (Anna Ishida, right) – come together in an online support group in TheatreWorks’ regional premie...

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Spiritual Life

Spiritual Briefs

Meditation group meets at Foothills Congregational

A Weekly Meditation Practice group meets 7-8:15 a.m. Tuesdays at Foothills Congregational Church, 461 Orange Ave., Los Altos.

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Magazine

Festival features fun for everyone

Festival features fun for everyone


TOWN CRIER FILE PHOTO
The Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival boasts more than 375 craft and arts booths.

This weekend’s 35th annual Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival promises to be jam-packed with fun activities for just about everyone. The eve...

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Angles and views: Los Altos Hills home offers challenge to mind and eye


Photos by Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Caye and Richard Johnson’s Los Altos Hills home boasts an angular backyard deck that juts from their large windows. The Johnsons constructed their home to mimic a treehouse, with no perfectly perpendicular lines.

Caye and Richard Johnson live in a treehouse – sort of.

Their multilevel home, built on a steeply sloped lot in Los Altos Hills, is a product of the Loma Prieta earthquake and their love of architecture. The view inside from the dramatic entry is of trees.

The Johnsons have lived on the property for 44 years. They loved the first house they built, which was Eichlerlike with a glass wall. But the 1989 quake caused it to separate nearly in half, leaving it habitable but in dire condition.

Rather than rebuild and retrofit it, they decided to start over.

“We looked for a young architect wanting to do interesting things,” said Richard, a fan of Richard Neutra and Frank Lloyd Wright.

“I didn’t want a square, boxy house,” said Caye, who had seen too many rentals that were advertised as light-filled but were depressingly dark.

Tobin Dougherty of Palo Alto filled the bill and, together with the Johnsons, designed a contemporary house that is all about angles and views. There are no square rooms.

An artistic space

Intersecting triangles form the motif, the most dramatic of which is the “prow” extending over the front entry. The front door continues the triangular motif in three different woods infilled with stonelike epoxy.

Ceiling beams extending from the interior to the exterior emphasize the lines. And five sets of vertical beams, which move as a unit, stabilize the house and add architectural interest.

Caye’s favorite view is from the backyard looking toward the soaring living room windows.

A plethora of glass capitalizes on the views from the 3,850-square-foot, four-bedroom house, which boasts a formal dining room, great room and study. The bar and a portion of the kitchen are cantilevered – “a tricky way to gain space,” Richard said.

A wine cellar and a barrel room with winemaking equipment are on the garage level.

Richard describes the house as “creative modern” based on angles that take advantage of the hillside and the sun.

“It is a continual challenge to the mind and eye,” he said.

In Dougherty’s words, “Juxtaposed angles, pathways, sun and site intertwine in a 45-degree dance of dramatic – yet domestic and intimate – artistic space.”

“Artistic” is the operative word, considering the eye-catching art pieces created by Richard. Noteworthy is one titled “Heavy Metal,” which measures 5-feet-by-10-feet and is made of Styrofoam shipping containers sprayed black. It hangs in the living room near a post-World War II handmade Rippen piano from Holland.

On another wall is a similar piece made from ink-cartridge shipping containers. Richard likes making things from found junk.

“This is interesting,” he says to himself. “What can I do with it?”

His muse could be Louise Nevelson.

The light-filled interiors provide a gallerylike setting for favorite things collected on their travels around the country and abroad.

Both worked in life sciences at Ames Research Center and spent a couple of months at the Johnson Space Center in 1969 analyzing the Apollo moon rocks. In addition, Richard worked on the Viking Mission to Mars and Caye worked on the space station.

After retiring from Ames, Richard worked at SRI before becoming a consultant and then turning his full attention to building the house.

A modern masterpiece

The Johnsons laid the slate floors themselves. Danish wood floors complement the slate.

The kitchen, on the first level, features a black and brown color scheme. The SieMatic cabinets from Germany are stained cherry, and the countertops are granite. The island is a 7-foot-by-6-foot trapezoidal slab of nearly black granite with red accents. The Johnsons used cardboard and plywood to mock up the island and create the perfect shape.

The kitchen includes a breakfast nook and flows into the great room, which features a Swedish corner fireplace.

Also on this level are the dining room, bar and powder room.

The powder room’s heavily textured black walls have traces of red, gold and silver – the perfect foil for a vibrant, masklike “face” that’s a clever composite of the face of Michelangelo’s David overpainted with a scene from the Sistine Chapel ceiling. The couple purchased it

in Florence.

A few steps down is the living room. From there, staircases with custom wrought-iron railings lead up to Richard’s study and down to the bedrooms.

The master suite features an earth-toned marble bathroom. The open walk-in shower is like a greenhouse.

“It’s like showering with nature,” Caye said.

No wonder. The house sits on a 1.5-acre lot that is parklike.

The Johnsons have four grown children and are in the process of downsizing – no easy task.

When they built their modern masterpiece two decades ago, their youngest child asked, “Mom and Dad, why can’t you build a regular house?”


Richard and Caye Johnson's "treehouse" - Photos by Los Altos Town Crier

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