Mon05022016

News

Loyola Corners economics, traffic rise to top of planning concerns

Loyola Corners economics, traffic rise to top of planning concerns

Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Loyola Bridge construction parallel to the Fremont Avenue frontage may lead officials to alter circulation plans for the area.

Loyola Corners stakeholders last week mulled the issues that will likely shape the area&rsquo...

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Schools

LAHS Green Team commemorates Earth Week

LAHS Green Team commemorates Earth Week


Traci Newell/Town Crier
Los Altos High School Green Team members, above, quiz their classmates about water conservation. The club distributed plants as prizes during the club’s Earth Week activities.

Members of the Los Altos High School Green...

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Community

Local pianist, 11, slated to perform Saturday at statewide competition

Local pianist, 11, slated to perform Saturday at statewide competition


Courtesy of the Cha family
Spencer Cha plays piano at a Santa Clara University recital. The sixth-grader also enjoys soccer, tennis, golf and skiing.

Spencer Cha has come a long way since he first sat down at the piano at age 2.

“I remem...

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Sports

Spartans net second place, eye top prize next season

Spartans net second place, eye top prize next season


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Jeremy Hsu, Mountain View High’s top singles player, competes against Pinewood Thursday. The Spartans won the match 7-0.

With freshmen playing the top three spots in singles, the future of the Mountain View High boy...

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Comment

Los Altos at a leadership crossroads: Editorial

Don’t look now, but there could be some major changes ahead regarding how the Los Altos city government is run.

The current city council has the opportunity to hire a new city manager in the wake of Marcia Somers’ recent resignation. Fur...

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Special Sections

How to personalize the wedding bar

How to personalize the wedding bar


Christine Moore/Special to the Town Crier
A seasonal signature cocktail adds interest beyond the standard wedding bar’s spirits and mixers. Focus on one set of fresh ingredients, such as blueberries, blackberries and mint for a dose of budget...

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Business

Farmers prepare to market season's bounty

Farmers prepare to market season's bounty


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Journeyman farmer Jen Friedlander waters Hidden Villa’s greenhouse plants, which will grow stronger in the controlled indoor environment before being transferred to the field outdoors.

Around Hidden Villa, the gree...

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People

BUOL JOANNE DOUGHERTY

BUOL JOANNE DOUGHERTY

1930-2016

Heaven gained a beautiful angel today. Our beloved mother’s blessed life ended in her Los Altos home surrounded by her loving family on April 18, 2016.

Buol Joanne Dougherty was born Sept. 28, 1930 in Chicago. At the age of two, M...

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Stepping Out

'Catch' comes to conclusion LA Stage Co. comedy  ends run this weekend

'Catch' comes to conclusion LA Stage Co. comedy ends run this weekend


Richard Mayer/Special to the Town Crier
Bryan Moriarty, left, stars as Yossarian and John Stephen King plays the Psychiatrist in Los Altos Stage Company’s “Catch-22.”

Los Altos Stage Company’s presentation of “Catch...

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Spiritual Life

A celebration like no other: Hospital hosts Neonatal Intensive Care Unit annual reunion


El Camino Hospital Neonatal Intensive Care Unit nurse Gilda Primero, right, reunites with Monica Kough and Danny Kaea, holding son Eli, Sept. 7.

A recent reunion of graduates in Mountain View had absolutely nothing to do with diplomas. In fact, some of these graduates still wear diapers.

In what has become an annual tradition for the past 19 years, El Camino Hospital hosted a reunion of former patients – or “graduates” – and the staff of its 20-bed, Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU).

The Sept. 7 gathering, according to NICU Clinical Manager Jody Charles, RN, was among the largest ever hosted by the hospital – more than 200 families of premature babies shared memories, hugs and laughs with Charles’ NICU staff. Charles noted that the annual get-together serves as her staff’s reward for their tireless efforts in nursing preterm babies to health.

“It was so much fun,” Charles said. “It’s very heartwarming for us to see the families and see where they’re at. … It’s a bit of a mutual admiration society.”

Positive outcomes

The reunion included San Jose resident Monica Kough and her 17-month-old son, Eli. Like other families at the event, Kough credited the hospital’s NICU staff for turning what was a dire situation into a positive outcome.

During her 28th week of pregnancy, Kough said her worst fears came true when her uterus ruptured. What made the situation especially critical, she noted, was the fact that she gave birth to her son, Ty, at 23 weeks into pregnancy one year earlier at El Camino’s NICU. He lived just 20 minutes.

According to the March of Dimes, preterm birth is the leading cause of newborn death in the U.S. More than half a million babies are born prematurely each year. In California, more than 58,000 babies are born prematurely annually.

This time around, Kough again found herself at the NICU undergoing an emergency C-section. Underdeveloped because of his premature birth, Eli spent 68 days in the NICU and learned functions most full-term babies gain during the 36th week of pregnancy, such as sucking, swallowing and breathing simultaneously. He also received three blood transfusions during his stay at the hospital.

“It was the scariest experience of my life,” said Kough, who later became a March of Dimes Ambassador – a first among El Camino NICU families – to help her cope with the loss of Ty and help others. “I couldn’t help but have flashbacks from my previous experience.”

Kough said it was the hospital’s NICU staff that made the ultimate difference for her family. She noted that the unit’s medical professionals – from nurses to doctors and everyone in between – remained patient and compassionate with her, despite facing a barrage of medical questions and other expressed concerns.

“I don’t know how I would’ve made it out of there sanely without them,” Kough said of the hospital’s NICU staff. “You go into it thinking, ‘How can I ever leave and go home to sleep?’ … They treat you like a human being. That’s exactly what you need in that situation.”

“It’s a lot of conversations and a lot of repeating,” added Charles regarding handling patients and family members in the NICU. “I often remind them that we will have the same conversation a lot of times, and that’s OK. … I always tell people that we’re here to help them exhale.”

These days, Kough said, Eli is “thriving like any 17-month-old.” Kough now visits the NICU on occasion with Eli and said she’s always welcomed “with open arms and a ‘please come in.’”

Lifelong bonds

Charles noted that experiences like Kough’s often have an effect on her and her staff. At times, it’s not just the mothers and fathers who shed tears, but the staff’s nurses and physicians as well. On countless occasions, Charles said she’s seen doctors stay up all night tending to struggling babies. Those experiences, she added, create lifelong bonds between her staff and the families they serve.

“It’s not everyone’s cup of tea, and that’s OK, but the people who do it are extremely passionate about it,” she said. “It’s extremely rewarding to our staff to see that they make a difference. We are a part of those families for the rest of their lives. … We’re here for any baby.”

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