Sun02142016

News

SPLAT targets data, outreach as airplane noise continues

SPLAT targets data, outreach as airplane noise continues


Graphic courtesy of Don Gardner
Activists claim that a new SFO flight path leaves a “sound shadow” that impacts Los Altos and Los Altos Hills.

Sky Posse Los Altos Team – more simply known as SPLAT – seeks to squelch the noise...

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Schools

Los Altos High student-run charity plans '5 Gallon Gala'

Los Altos High student-run charity plans '5 Gallon Gala'


Courtesy of Lia Evard
Water by Youth members gave Egan students a chance to carry a 40-pound Jerry can, to see how difficult it is to obtain water in developing nations.

Water by Youth, a club at Los Altos High School, is making a splash by pla...

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Community

What would you do with a box of cookies? Local Girls Scouts help Tanzanian orphanage

What would you do with a box of cookies? Local Girls Scouts help Tanzanian orphanage


Courtesy of Alicia Madden
Sales of local Girl Scout cookies support service projects, such as funding an orphanage in the village of Mto wa Mbu in Tanzania.

Girl Scout cookies – whether you think of them as a treat, a tradition or a diet comp...

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Sports

Scoreless spells sink LA boys

Scoreless spells sink LA boys


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Los Altos High point guard Nolan Brennan attempts a shot in Friday’s game versus Palo Alto. He scored eight points in the loss.

There have been several games this season in which the Los Altos High boys basketball t...

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Comment

New 'York' values

New 'York' values


Hughes

 

As we have witnessed California suffer through one of its worst droughts in history over the past few years, all of us, I’m sure, have been keenly aware of our surroundings and have done a small part in trying to conserve wa...

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Special Sections

Getting a charge  out of the Volt

Getting a charge out of the Volt


Courtesy of Chevrolet
The 2016 Chevrolet Volt can be driven up to 50 miles on the power stored in its batteries.

Just five years ago, we wondered in this column what the power supply would be for the car of the future. Gasoline, diesel, electric ba...

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Business

Nearing V-Day: Shops stock sweets, treats

Nearing V-Day: Shops stock sweets, treats


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Los Altos resident Ella Roosakos, 11, with her mother, Gail, puzzles over which Gourmet Works sweets to buy as a valentine for Ella’s friend.

The gift-buying rush isn’t exclusive to Christmas. It may jump over...

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People

ALAN RODNEY MILLS

ALAN RODNEY MILLS

Alan Rodney Mills, PhD, 83, of Los Altos passed away peacefully on Saturday, January 30th, 2016. He was born in Rochdale, England in 1933 and came to California in 1962. He was a proud alumni of Manchester Grammar in England, University of Liverpoo...

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Stepping Out

PYT 'Gets Famous'

PYT 'Gets Famous'


Lyn Flaim Healy/Spotlight Moments Photography
Renee Vetter of Palo Alto, left, and Megan Foreman of Los Altos star in Peninsula Youth Theatre’s “Judy Moody Gets Famous.” Performances are scheduled Friday and Saturday.

Peninsula...

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Spiritual Life

A time to prepare: Fasting for Lent isn't limited to food

 

Today is Ash Wednesday, which in the Christian calendar marks the beginning of Lent – the 40 days of preparation for Resurrection Sunday, otherwise known as Easter.

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Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

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Getting the red out: How to manage your child's eczema

Dry, red, itchy and scaly patches on your child’s skin may be signs of eczema, a condition caused by skin inflammation. Also called atopic dermatitis, eczema often runs in families and is linked to allergic conditions such as asthma and hay fever.

While there’s no cure for eczema, your child’s skin will often improve substantially by the time he or reaches school age (around 4 or 5), and many children outgrow this uncomfortable condition.

Eczema flares up, subsides and often improves on its own. The rough, scaly and occasionally oozing patches that signal eczema usually appear on babies’ cheeks, forehead and scalp at three or four months of age.

Older children typically have the patches inside their elbow creases and wrists, at the back of the knees and on their necks.

Managing eczema

Following are some tips to help manage your child’s eczema.

• Moisturize frequently. Apply a cream or ointment-based moisturizer twice a day if possible, even when the skin looks good. Products that contain ceramides (natural lipids) that repair the skin barrier, such as CeraVe and Cetaphil, may be particularly effective. Other options include products made by Aquaphor, Aveeno, Eucerin and Vaseline.

• Apply steroid creams. Use an over-the-counter hydrocortisone cream or ointment twice a day to help control itching and reduce inflammation. Your child’s doctor can prescribe a stronger topical steroid medication if the itching or rash is severe.

• Try antihistamines. Calm itchiness with an over-the-counter oral antihistamine, like Benadryl or Zyrtec, especially if the itching disrupts your child’s sleep.

• Choose the right sunscreen. Avoid products containing “chemical blockers.” Instead, pick a sunscreen that contains zinc oxide and/or titanium dioxide (“physical blockers”) as the active ingredients and doesn’t include a long list of other ingredients

• Try these bathing tips. Daily baths or showers are recommended, keeping in mind that the goal is to “soak and seal.” Use lukewarm instead of hot water, with a gentle soap product from Aveeno, California Baby, CeraVe, Cetaphil or Dove. Immediately after the bath, apply the topical steroid medication (if you use one) followed by moisturizer.

• Stop the scratching. Children with eczema are sometimes more prone to skin infections. Scratching compounds the problem, making skin vulnerable to staph and other infections. When the skin is raw, scabbed or oozing, skin infection might be playing a role in driving the eczema. In this case, consider trying diluted bleach baths to control eczema flare-ups. These baths can sterilize the skin and prevent as well as treat infections. Add one-eighth to one-quarter cup of regular bleach to the bathwater in a full-sized bathtub three times per week. It’s also important to see a doctor in order to treat infections as quickly as possible so they don’t spread.

• For severe eczema, try wet-wrap therapy. After bathing and applying the topical steroid medication and moisturizer, put your child in a barely damp pair of pajamas, then add a pair of dry pajamas over the top. This may help improve sleep and calm the inflamed skin.

• Learn about long-term therapy options. Under a doctor’s supervision, children older than 3 or 4 with chronic and severe eczema may benefit over the long term from systemic therapies, including ultraviolet light therapy and oral medications.

Dr. Amy E. Gilliam is a pediatric dermatologist at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation’s Palo Alto, Dublin and Fremont centers.

The Palo Alto Medical Foundation and column editor Arian Dasmalchi provide this monthly column.

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