Sun01252015

News

UPDATED: Missing Los Altos High School student found

UPDATED at 10:20 p.m. Jan. 21: Mountain View Police report that Avendano is safe after being located in Los Angeles County.

__________

The Mountain View Police Department is looking for 17 year-old Mountain View resident Lizbeth Avendano. Accordin...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

MVLA revisits prospect of ninth-grade PE exemptions

MVLA revisits prospect of ninth-grade PE exemptions


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
The Mountain View Los Altos Union High School District Board of Trustees is scheduled to vote on a proposal to exempt ninth-grade student-athletes from taking PE. Students take part in a physical education class at Mount...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

Midnight Express offers late-night rides from SF

Midnight Express offers late-night rides from SF


From Midnight Express Instagram
A group of millennial-aged Santas celebrating a night on the town prepare for a safe ride from San Francisco to their South Bay homes, courtesy of Cory Althoff’s new Midnight Express shuttle.

It’s no understatemen...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

More open than ever: Editorial

One of the Los Altos City Council’s objectives for 2015 is implementing an open-government policy. The title of the policy may be somewhat misleading, because it’s not as if the city has had a closed-government policy. But the new proposal goes beyon...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

Cassidy Turley, DTZ plan to combine

Cassidy Turley, DTZ plan to combine


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Cassidy Turley, which has offices at 339 S. San Antonio Road, is combining with DTZ following its recent acquisition.

Commercial real estate services companies DTZ and Cassidy Turley have joined forces to operate as a sin...

Read more:

Loading...

Books

Gawande's

Gawande's "Being Mortal" proves an important book on aging


Books about death and dying are usually not on my list of “must reads.”

I couldn’t resist, however, the best-selling “Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End” (Metropolitan Books, 2014) by Atul Gawande.

Read more:

Loading...

People

JUDY HOFFMANN

JUDY HOFFMANN

Judy Hoffmann passed away unexpectedly October 17, 2014 in New York City. It was only fitting Judy would be traveling and enjoying special adventures in so many different places until the very end.

Judy has lived since 1969 in Los Altos with her h...

Read more:

Loading...

Travel

Cuban photographer slated to appear at Foothill

Cuban photographer slated to appear at Foothill


Courtesy of Raúl Cañibano
Cuban photographer Raúl Cañibano is set to appear at Foothill College tonight. His work – including the image “Series: Guajira’s Land, Viñales, 2007,” right – is on display at the KCI Gallery t...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

TheatreWorks launches '2 Pianos' in Mtn. View

TheatreWorks launches '2 Pianos' in Mtn. View


Suellen Fitzsimmons/Special to the Town Crier
Christopher Tocco stars in TheatreWorks’ “2 Pianos 4 Hands,” which opened last week.

TheatreWorks’ production of “2 Pianos 4 Hands” is scheduled to run through Feb. 15 at the Mountain View Center fo...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

Start something great by ringing in the new year with prayer

There is a tradition, which I’m told originates in the Midwest, that calls for people to pray in the new year. A few years ago, I was invited to a friend’s house and a number of people stayed up until midnight (approximately two hours pa...

Read more:

Loading...

Magazine

Christmas At Our House home tour celebrates 26 years

Christmas At Our House home tour celebrates 26 years


Courtesy of Christopher Stark
Homes on the St. Francis High School Women’s Club’s Christmas at Our House Holiday Home Tour showcase a variety of architectural styles.

The days grow short on sunshine but long on nostalgia as the holidays approach...

Read more:

Loading...

Getting the red out: How to manage your child's eczema

Dry, red, itchy and scaly patches on your child’s skin may be signs of eczema, a condition caused by skin inflammation. Also called atopic dermatitis, eczema often runs in families and is linked to allergic conditions such as asthma and hay fever.

While there’s no cure for eczema, your child’s skin will often improve substantially by the time he or reaches school age (around 4 or 5), and many children outgrow this uncomfortable condition.

Eczema flares up, subsides and often improves on its own. The rough, scaly and occasionally oozing patches that signal eczema usually appear on babies’ cheeks, forehead and scalp at three or four months of age.

Older children typically have the patches inside their elbow creases and wrists, at the back of the knees and on their necks.

Managing eczema

Following are some tips to help manage your child’s eczema.

• Moisturize frequently. Apply a cream or ointment-based moisturizer twice a day if possible, even when the skin looks good. Products that contain ceramides (natural lipids) that repair the skin barrier, such as CeraVe and Cetaphil, may be particularly effective. Other options include products made by Aquaphor, Aveeno, Eucerin and Vaseline.

• Apply steroid creams. Use an over-the-counter hydrocortisone cream or ointment twice a day to help control itching and reduce inflammation. Your child’s doctor can prescribe a stronger topical steroid medication if the itching or rash is severe.

• Try antihistamines. Calm itchiness with an over-the-counter oral antihistamine, like Benadryl or Zyrtec, especially if the itching disrupts your child’s sleep.

• Choose the right sunscreen. Avoid products containing “chemical blockers.” Instead, pick a sunscreen that contains zinc oxide and/or titanium dioxide (“physical blockers”) as the active ingredients and doesn’t include a long list of other ingredients

• Try these bathing tips. Daily baths or showers are recommended, keeping in mind that the goal is to “soak and seal.” Use lukewarm instead of hot water, with a gentle soap product from Aveeno, California Baby, CeraVe, Cetaphil or Dove. Immediately after the bath, apply the topical steroid medication (if you use one) followed by moisturizer.

• Stop the scratching. Children with eczema are sometimes more prone to skin infections. Scratching compounds the problem, making skin vulnerable to staph and other infections. When the skin is raw, scabbed or oozing, skin infection might be playing a role in driving the eczema. In this case, consider trying diluted bleach baths to control eczema flare-ups. These baths can sterilize the skin and prevent as well as treat infections. Add one-eighth to one-quarter cup of regular bleach to the bathwater in a full-sized bathtub three times per week. It’s also important to see a doctor in order to treat infections as quickly as possible so they don’t spread.

• For severe eczema, try wet-wrap therapy. After bathing and applying the topical steroid medication and moisturizer, put your child in a barely damp pair of pajamas, then add a pair of dry pajamas over the top. This may help improve sleep and calm the inflamed skin.

• Learn about long-term therapy options. Under a doctor’s supervision, children older than 3 or 4 with chronic and severe eczema may benefit over the long term from systemic therapies, including ultraviolet light therapy and oral medications.

Dr. Amy E. Gilliam is a pediatric dermatologist at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation’s Palo Alto, Dublin and Fremont centers.

The Palo Alto Medical Foundation and column editor Arian Dasmalchi provide this monthly column.

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos