Mon09152014

News

Council approves directional signs for Los Altos' Woodland Plaza

Council approves directional signs for Los Altos' Woodland Plaza


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
The Los Altos City Council last week approved the installation of two new directional signs on Foothill Expressway pointing motorists to the Woodland Plaza Shopping District.

The Los Altos City Council voted unanimou...

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Schools

New head of curriculum’s ideologies align with LASD

New head of curriculum’s ideologies align with LASD


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Edsel Clark, new Los Altos School District assistant superintendent for curriculum and instruction, above, facilitates a junior high mathematics curriculum meeting last week.

Edsel Clark, Ed.D., new assistant superintend...

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Community

Closing reception caps Foothill photo show on rural China

Closing reception caps Foothill photo show on rural China


From IncredibleTravelPhotos.com
Jacque Kae’s “Mischievous” is one of the many photographs on display at Foothill College this month.

Photographs of the land and culture of Huangshan and Zhangjiajie, China, are on exhibit through Sept. 26 at t...

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Sports

Spartans shine in opener

Spartans shine in opener


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Mountain View High’s Frank Kapp snares a touchdown pass from quarterback Owen Mountford in Friday’s win.

Leading by a point at halftime, the Mountain View High football team outscored visiting Del Mar 20-0 the rest of...

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Comment

A look ahead to the Nov. 4 election: Editorial

Election season is upon us. In Los Altos, we have three major local races ahead – two seats on the Los Altos City Council, and three seats each on the Los Altos School District and Mountain View-Los Altos Union High School District boards of tr...

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Special Sections

Renovation complete,  Villa Siena looks to future

Renovation complete, Villa Siena looks to future


Above and Below Photos Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier; Left Photo Courtesy of Villa Siena
Villa Siena in Mountain View recently underwent a $35 million face-lift. The five-year project expanded their senior living community’s space and ability to serv...

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Business

Transitioning from postage to pets

Transitioning from postage to pets


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
A new Pet Food Express store is scheduled to open at the Blossom Valley Shopping Center this month.

A site that previously existed to meet postal service needs will soon have an entirely different purpose – serving pe...

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Books

‘The Humans’ transcends alien genre to glean human insights

‘The Humans’ transcends alien genre to glean human insights


A good story about aliens is always great fun to read – after all, it’s only by attempting to understand the human race from another perspective that we can see ourselves more objectively.

But readers who might be tempted to dismiss ye...

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People

JEANNE PACKARD

After suffering a stroke in May, Jeanne Packard died August 10, 2014 at age 83. She was born in 1931 in Berlin, Germany, the only child of Emily Channel and Frank Howe Packard of Chicago, IL. Jeanne is survived by 5 great grandchildren. She was a lon...

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Travel

LA photographer spends a night with cranes – and moose – in Alaska

LA photographer spends a night with cranes – and moose – in Alaska


Sandy Powell/Special to the Town Crier
Los Altos resident and bird photographer Sandy Powell recently visited Homer, Alaska, to photograph Sandhill cranes, below. While there, Powell also encountered moose, left.

Los Altos resident Sandy Powell, a...

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Stepping Out

'Trailer Park' opens in Los Altos

'Trailer Park' opens in Los Altos


Courtesy of Los
The cast of Los Altos Stage Company’s “The Great American Trailer Park Musical” includes, from left, Mylissa Malley as Lin, Vanessa Alvarez as Betty, and Christina Bolognini as Pickles. Altos Stage Company

Los Altos Stage Company...

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Spiritual Life

9/11 survivor Michael Hingson finds purpose

Imagine walking down 78 flights of stairs – 1,463 individual steps. You are in imminent danger as you walk, unsure whether you can make it out of the building before it collapses or explodes. Struggling for each breath, you smell the heavy sten...

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Magazine

Los Altos Hills home showcases resort-inspired living

Los Altos Hills home showcases resort-inspired living


Courtesy of Spectrum Interior Design
In place of a more traditional fireplace, this modern living room features a linear-flame firebox that emits heat while offering a sculpturelike design element.

After traveling the world and visiting a host...

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Getting the red out: How to manage your child's eczema

Dry, red, itchy and scaly patches on your child’s skin may be signs of eczema, a condition caused by skin inflammation. Also called atopic dermatitis, eczema often runs in families and is linked to allergic conditions such as asthma and hay fever.

While there’s no cure for eczema, your child’s skin will often improve substantially by the time he or reaches school age (around 4 or 5), and many children outgrow this uncomfortable condition.

Eczema flares up, subsides and often improves on its own. The rough, scaly and occasionally oozing patches that signal eczema usually appear on babies’ cheeks, forehead and scalp at three or four months of age.

Older children typically have the patches inside their elbow creases and wrists, at the back of the knees and on their necks.

Managing eczema

Following are some tips to help manage your child’s eczema.

• Moisturize frequently. Apply a cream or ointment-based moisturizer twice a day if possible, even when the skin looks good. Products that contain ceramides (natural lipids) that repair the skin barrier, such as CeraVe and Cetaphil, may be particularly effective. Other options include products made by Aquaphor, Aveeno, Eucerin and Vaseline.

• Apply steroid creams. Use an over-the-counter hydrocortisone cream or ointment twice a day to help control itching and reduce inflammation. Your child’s doctor can prescribe a stronger topical steroid medication if the itching or rash is severe.

• Try antihistamines. Calm itchiness with an over-the-counter oral antihistamine, like Benadryl or Zyrtec, especially if the itching disrupts your child’s sleep.

• Choose the right sunscreen. Avoid products containing “chemical blockers.” Instead, pick a sunscreen that contains zinc oxide and/or titanium dioxide (“physical blockers”) as the active ingredients and doesn’t include a long list of other ingredients

• Try these bathing tips. Daily baths or showers are recommended, keeping in mind that the goal is to “soak and seal.” Use lukewarm instead of hot water, with a gentle soap product from Aveeno, California Baby, CeraVe, Cetaphil or Dove. Immediately after the bath, apply the topical steroid medication (if you use one) followed by moisturizer.

• Stop the scratching. Children with eczema are sometimes more prone to skin infections. Scratching compounds the problem, making skin vulnerable to staph and other infections. When the skin is raw, scabbed or oozing, skin infection might be playing a role in driving the eczema. In this case, consider trying diluted bleach baths to control eczema flare-ups. These baths can sterilize the skin and prevent as well as treat infections. Add one-eighth to one-quarter cup of regular bleach to the bathwater in a full-sized bathtub three times per week. It’s also important to see a doctor in order to treat infections as quickly as possible so they don’t spread.

• For severe eczema, try wet-wrap therapy. After bathing and applying the topical steroid medication and moisturizer, put your child in a barely damp pair of pajamas, then add a pair of dry pajamas over the top. This may help improve sleep and calm the inflamed skin.

• Learn about long-term therapy options. Under a doctor’s supervision, children older than 3 or 4 with chronic and severe eczema may benefit over the long term from systemic therapies, including ultraviolet light therapy and oral medications.

Dr. Amy E. Gilliam is a pediatric dermatologist at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation’s Palo Alto, Dublin and Fremont centers.

The Palo Alto Medical Foundation and column editor Arian Dasmalchi provide this monthly column.

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