Sun04192015

News

Car breaks through glass door, closes Trader Joe’s for the day

Car breaks through glass door, closes Trader Joe’s for the day

Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Trader Joe's employees survey the damage after a car smashed through the glass doorway earlier today.

Trader Joe’s on Homestead Road is closed for the remainder of the day (April 17) after a car barreled through the glas...

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Schools

Pinewood student writes book about living with autism

Pinewood student writes book about living with autism


Traci Newell/Town Crier
Pinewood School senior Georgia Lyon wrote and illustrated “How to Be Human: Diary of an Autistic Girl” in 2013.

Although first published under a pseudonym, Pinewood School student Georgia Lyon is stepping out to ...

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Community

Sale offers opportunity to 'discover' jewels, fight cancer

Sale offers opportunity to 'discover' jewels, fight cancer

Volunteers and staff at the American Cancer Society's Discovery Shop in downtown Los Altos urge shoppers to "Be A Gem, Buy A Jewel" during the shop's special sale this Friday (April 17) and Saturday (April 18).

The sale is an opportunity to find Mot...

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Comment

Editorial: Let's assume not to presume

Two recent downtown Los Altos stories offer lessons in the drawbacks of jumping to conclusions.

A few months back, the Town Crier published an article on Ladera Autoworks on First Street closing its doors. That part was true, but the reason was not....

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Special Sections

Fitness focus: No holds barred for Los Altos sisters

Fitness focus: No holds barred for Los Altos sisters


Photos Courtesy of Barre 3
Gillian Brotherson, kneeling at left, guides studio instructors through a workout at barre3 Los Altos.

Health is all about balance. That’s what two Los Altos natives learned as they navigated work, motherhood and welln...

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Business

Steinway gallery brings pianos, musicians to downtown Los Altos

Steinway gallery brings pianos, musicians to downtown Los Altos


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Chrissy Huang, manager of Steinway Piano Gallery in Los Altos, showcases Steinway & Sons’ signature instruments. The gallery plans to host concerts with performers tickling the ivories.

A new downtown Los Altos bus...

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Books

'Pope Joan' Book weaves tale around legend of female pontiff

'Pope Joan' Book weaves tale around legend of female pontiff


The idea that there may have a female pope at one time in history has generated much speculation throughout the centuries. “Pope Joan” (Crown, 1996) by Donna Woolfolk Cross, does not answer the question; rather, the author has created a detai...

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People

GREG STAHLER

GREG STAHLER

Greg Stahler died unexpecdly in his home in Belmont on March 26, 2015. (He was born in Mountain View on June 23, 1972). He will really be missed by three beautiful young children, Haley 7, Hannah 5, and Tyler 3, and his wife Kathryn. He will also b...

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Travel

Cuba libre: Local residents join mad rush of travelers

Cuba libre: Local residents join mad rush of travelers


Natalie Elefant/Special to the Town Crier
Los Altos resident Natalie Elefant noted the vibrant street performances as a traveler in Cuba.

The U.S. restored diplomatic relations with Cuba late last year, enabling Americans to import $100 worth of cig...

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Stepping Out

'Those Darn Squirrels' invading Mountain View

'Those Darn Squirrels' invading Mountain View


Courtesy of Lyn Flaim Healy/ Spotlight Moments Photography
Noelle Merino stars in Peninsula Youth Theatre’s “Those Darn Squirrels.”

The Peninsula Youth Theatre’s world premiere adaptation of “Those Darn Squirrels” is scheduled Friday and Saturda...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

Food for thought: Hidden Villa programs offer teens training in sustainability on the farm

Food for thought: Hidden Villa programs offer teens training in sustainability on the farm


/Town Crier It’s not all cute and cuddly for teens participating in the eight-week Animal Husbandry Apprenticeship program at Hidden Villa in Los Altos Hills. Mia Mosing of Palo Alto, left, and Sophia Jackson of Los Altos clean the pigpens – one of...

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Inside Mountain View

Home for disabled youth yields greener pastures

Home for disabled youth yields greener pastures


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Green Pastures staff member JP Mercada, below right, helps Tommy, who lives at the group home, sort through papers and organize his room.

Tucked in the corner of a quiet residential cul-de-sac in Mountain View, Green Pastur...

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Letters to the Editor

Let students decide what to eat for lunch

Only in the government-run re-education schools can an administrator get away with telling high school students what they can and can’t eat for lunch. I’m talking to you, Mountain View Los Altos Union High School Superintendent Barry Groves (“Food fight ahead? City council asked to consider ban on mobile vendors near Los Altos High,” Sept. 11).

Many of these students are already adults, and the others will be adults very soon. The reason they all want to go out to the street to buy lunch from food trucks is because they don’t like your food. Educators don’t know this, but this is the free market at work. Students are willing to pay more for their lunch with less convenience to escape the crappy food the school has to offer.

No one had to force them to buy from the food trucks, and no one had to force the food trucks to sell it to them. If you had your way, you would make lunchtime in the school cafeteria mandatory and force-feed your students.

This must be a terrible admission of failure to prepare these high school students to go out and get a job or go to college if they don’t even know how to eat lunch. What would happen if their future employers told them what they could and couldn’t eat for lunch? They would quit, and their employers would not be able to get enough good employees.

The students are not breaking any laws or acting immorally by wanting good, tasty food from these vendors, which, in fact, often have nutritious, healthful food along with sweets and snack food. If you get the town to ban them from selling to the high school students, the trucks should also be banned from selling anywhere in the town, including festivals and farmers’ markets. And while you’re at it, you can make a list of other banned items, including certain cars, light bulbs, toilets, clothing, music and anything else you don’t like.

Superintendent Groves, it’s not up to you or the Central Committee what high school students eat for lunch. It’s solely up to them and their parents. You wouldn’t understand. You’ve been in public education way too long.

Ron Knapp

Los Altos

High school food equal of gourmet trucks?

I read your article “Food fight ahead?” with great interest. But I was puzzled by this sentence: “However, unlike the popular gourmet food truck trend often seen in metropolitan areas, the mobile vendors near the high school sell items to students that can’t be found on campus – candy bars, sugary sodas, quesadillas and more.”

Are you implying that the food served at Los Altos High is the equal to that served by gourmet food trucks?  If so, I believe a review of the Los Altos High food is in order.

Or you might have meant that gourmet food trucks serve healthier food than those behind campus.  I look forward to your nutritional analysis comparing a random sample of “gourmet” food trucks with those working at Los Altos High.

Tony Lima

Los Altos

A lesson in bag economics

Basic economics teaches us that whenever a product is banned or restricted, three events will happen: a black market for the banned product appears; the price of the restricted product increases dramatically; and localities that do not have the ban or restrictions will see an increase in migration, for example, our best writers moving to Europe to flee Prohibition in the 1920s and today’s potheads moving to Colorado.

The current ban on plastic bags and fee restrictions on paper bags provide a case in point.

The use of paper bags for storing old newspapers and the use of plastic bags for dog droppings will always be there. Over time, your current stash of bags, which is crammed next to your refrigerator or washing machine, will be depleted and you will not only start paying 10 cents for a paper bag, but also will buy more fruits and vegetables just to get those skimpy plastic bags that are still offered.

Supermarkets will recognize this increase in paper-bag demand and will most certainly double or triple the fees that are charged for them. At the same time, the price of bootleg plastic bags on eBay will soar.

Fortunately, there are enlightened communities such as Fresno that still cherish our bag freedoms and have not succumbed to pressure for any type of bag restrictions. These communities will see a tidal wave of migration as the access for free bags eclipses education as the prime motivation for buying real estate.

There are two ways that all of us can now profit from the situation: Invest in plastic bag futures and buy land in Fresno.

Wayne King

Los Altos

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