Thu07302015

News

Cal Water says no E. coli in water; limits boiling advisory area

Cal Water says no E. coli in water; limits boiling advisory area

Cal Water officials said today that preliminary water quality test results were negative for E. coli were negative and "only a single hydrant" in the South El Monte area of Los Altos showed the presence of total coliform. They reduced the "boil your ...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

BCS hosts Stretch to Kindergarten program for underserved youth

BCS hosts Stretch to Kindergarten program for underserved youth


Traci Newell/Town Crier
The six-week, tuition-free Stretch to Kindergarten program, hosted at Bullis Charter School, serves children who have not attended preschool. A teacher leads children in singing about the parts of a butterfly, above.

Local un...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

Google car painting project calls on artists

Google car painting project calls on artists


Google self-driving car

Already known as an innovator in the tech field, Google Inc. is now moving in on the art world.

The Mountain View-based company July 11 launched the “Paint the Town” contest, a “moving art experiment” that invites Califo...

Read more:

Loading...

Sports

Pedaling with a purpose

Pedaling with a purpose


courtesy of
Rishi Bommannan Rishi Bommannan cycled from Bates College in Maine to his home in Los Altos Hills, taking several selfies along the way. He also raised nearly $13,000 for the Livestrong Foundation, which supports cancer patients.

When R...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

The truth about coyotes: Other Voices

The Town Crier’s recent article on coyotes venturing down from the foothills in search of sustenance referenced the organization Project Coyote (“Recent coyote attacks keep residents on edge,” July 1). Do not waste your time contac...

Read more:

Loading...

Special Sections

Grant Park senior program made permanent

Grant Park senior program made permanent


Photos by Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Local residents participate in an exercise class at the Grant Park Senior Center, above. Betsy Reeves, below left with Gail Enenstein, lobbied for senior programming in south Los Altos.

It all began when Betsy Reev...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

New State Street rug retailer has downtown Los Altos covered

New State Street rug retailer has downtown Los Altos covered


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Los Altos Rug Gallery owner Fahim Karimi stocks his State Street store with a wall-to-wall array of floor coverings.

A new downtown business owner plans to roll out the red carpet – along with rugs of every other color –...

Read more:

Loading...

Books

Book Signings

• Fritz and Nomi Trapnell have scheduled a book-signing party 4-6 p.m. Aug. 1 at their home, 648 University Ave., Los Altos.

Fritz and his daughter, Dana Tibbitts, co-authored “Harnessing the Sky: Frederick ‘Trap’ Trapnell, ...

Read more:

Loading...

People

GRACE WILSON FRANKS

GRACE WILSON FRANKS

Resident of Los Altos

Grace Wilson Franks, our beloved mother and grandmother, left us peacefully on July 16, 2015 just a few weeks short of her 92nd birthday. She was born to Ross and Florence (Cruzan) Wilson in rural Tulare, California on Septem...

Read more:

Loading...

Travel

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories


Eren Göknar/Special to the Town Crier
San Francisco-based humangear Inc. sells totes, tubes and tubs for traveling.

In travel, as in romance, it’s the little things that count.

Beyond the glossy brochures lie the travel discomforts too mun...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

Going out with a 'Bang'

Going out with a 'Bang'


Richard Mayer/Special to the Town Crier
“Chitty Chitty Bang Bang” stars, clockwise from top left, Alexander Sanchez, Sophia Sturiale, Deborah Rosengaus and Danny Martin.

Los Altos Stage Company and Los Altos Youth Theatre’s joint production of t...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

Build a 'light' house and get out of that dark place

Most of us have a place inside our hearts and minds that occasionally causes us trouble. For some, it is sadness, depression or despair. For others, it may be fear, anger, resentment or myriad other emotional “dark places” that at times seem to hij...

Read more:

Loading...

Magazine

Inside Mountain View

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
NASA Ames’ Pluto Flyover event kindles the imaginations of young attendees.

Sue Moore watched the July 20, 1969, moon landing beside patients and staff members of the San Francisco hospital where she worked as a nurse...

Read more:

Loading...

Letters to the Editor

Let students decide what to eat for lunch

Only in the government-run re-education schools can an administrator get away with telling high school students what they can and can’t eat for lunch. I’m talking to you, Mountain View Los Altos Union High School Superintendent Barry Groves (“Food fight ahead? City council asked to consider ban on mobile vendors near Los Altos High,” Sept. 11).

Many of these students are already adults, and the others will be adults very soon. The reason they all want to go out to the street to buy lunch from food trucks is because they don’t like your food. Educators don’t know this, but this is the free market at work. Students are willing to pay more for their lunch with less convenience to escape the crappy food the school has to offer.

No one had to force them to buy from the food trucks, and no one had to force the food trucks to sell it to them. If you had your way, you would make lunchtime in the school cafeteria mandatory and force-feed your students.

This must be a terrible admission of failure to prepare these high school students to go out and get a job or go to college if they don’t even know how to eat lunch. What would happen if their future employers told them what they could and couldn’t eat for lunch? They would quit, and their employers would not be able to get enough good employees.

The students are not breaking any laws or acting immorally by wanting good, tasty food from these vendors, which, in fact, often have nutritious, healthful food along with sweets and snack food. If you get the town to ban them from selling to the high school students, the trucks should also be banned from selling anywhere in the town, including festivals and farmers’ markets. And while you’re at it, you can make a list of other banned items, including certain cars, light bulbs, toilets, clothing, music and anything else you don’t like.

Superintendent Groves, it’s not up to you or the Central Committee what high school students eat for lunch. It’s solely up to them and their parents. You wouldn’t understand. You’ve been in public education way too long.

Ron Knapp

Los Altos

High school food equal of gourmet trucks?

I read your article “Food fight ahead?” with great interest. But I was puzzled by this sentence: “However, unlike the popular gourmet food truck trend often seen in metropolitan areas, the mobile vendors near the high school sell items to students that can’t be found on campus – candy bars, sugary sodas, quesadillas and more.”

Are you implying that the food served at Los Altos High is the equal to that served by gourmet food trucks?  If so, I believe a review of the Los Altos High food is in order.

Or you might have meant that gourmet food trucks serve healthier food than those behind campus.  I look forward to your nutritional analysis comparing a random sample of “gourmet” food trucks with those working at Los Altos High.

Tony Lima

Los Altos

A lesson in bag economics

Basic economics teaches us that whenever a product is banned or restricted, three events will happen: a black market for the banned product appears; the price of the restricted product increases dramatically; and localities that do not have the ban or restrictions will see an increase in migration, for example, our best writers moving to Europe to flee Prohibition in the 1920s and today’s potheads moving to Colorado.

The current ban on plastic bags and fee restrictions on paper bags provide a case in point.

The use of paper bags for storing old newspapers and the use of plastic bags for dog droppings will always be there. Over time, your current stash of bags, which is crammed next to your refrigerator or washing machine, will be depleted and you will not only start paying 10 cents for a paper bag, but also will buy more fruits and vegetables just to get those skimpy plastic bags that are still offered.

Supermarkets will recognize this increase in paper-bag demand and will most certainly double or triple the fees that are charged for them. At the same time, the price of bootleg plastic bags on eBay will soar.

Fortunately, there are enlightened communities such as Fresno that still cherish our bag freedoms and have not succumbed to pressure for any type of bag restrictions. These communities will see a tidal wave of migration as the access for free bags eclipses education as the prime motivation for buying real estate.

There are two ways that all of us can now profit from the situation: Invest in plastic bag futures and buy land in Fresno.

Wayne King

Los Altos

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos