Fri12262014

News

Merry spirits: Traditional holiday drinks and memories that surround them

Merry spirits: Traditional holiday drinks and memories that surround them


Christine Moore/Special to the Town Crier
Town Crier columnist Christine Moore’s holiday drink menu includes her take on the Moscow Mule, the Bucking Reindeer.

Growing up, our dogs were always outside dogs. We lived in the country, which made...

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Schools

Santa Rita visits The Terraces

Santa Rita visits The Terraces


Susie Greenwald’s third-grade class at Santa Rita School has a special relationship with The Terraces at Los Altos, a senior retirement community. The class visits the center once a month to share quality time with the residents, above. The s...

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Community

Veterinarians offer advice for keeping pets safe over holidays

Veterinarians offer advice for keeping pets safe over holidays


Traci Newell/Town Crier
The holidays present a number of hazards for pets. Be sure to secure electrical cords to keep playful cats at bay.

During the holidays – when people tend to focus more on family and food – pets are often overlooked. But...

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Sports

Owls getting a lot out of a little

Owls getting a lot out of a little


In a typical season for the Foothill College women’s basketball team, coach Jody Craig wouldn’t be satisfied with a 7-4 start and No. 8 ranking in Northern California.

But this isn’t a typical season. Craig had just a few weeks ...

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Comment

Holiday cheer: No Shoes, Please

Admittedly, the holidays are not my favorite time of year. I don’t like sharing streets and parking lots with a zillion other people who need to get their shopping done. I don’t like being reminded by a holiday doomsday countdown clock h...

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Special Sections

Looking Ahead

Looking Ahead


s in line to be mayor of Mountain View in 2015.

Mountain View anticipates the following changes in 2015:

• Beginning Jan. 1, Mountain View City Councilmembers will receive a raise to $1,000 per month as a result of the passage of Measure A in...

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Business

Pharmacy headed to 400 Main St.

Pharmacy headed to 400 Main St.


Ellie Van houtte/Town Crier
Pharmaca Integrative Pharmacy is scheduled to open a new store in the Jeffrey A. Morris Group’s 400 Main St. project. The new location will open in late February.

A new tenant is slated to call the recently complet...

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Books

Gawande's

Gawande's "Being Mortal" proves an important book on aging


Books about death and dying are usually not on my list of “must reads.”

I couldn’t resist, however, the best-selling “Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End” (Metropolitan Books, 2014) by Atul Gawande.

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People

MERLYN "DALE" STUBBS

Merlyn "Dale" Stubbs, a 51 year resident of Los Altos Hills, passed away on December 15, 2014.

Dale was born to Harry and Anna Stubbs in Americus, Kansas on February 10, 1926.

When Dale was 9 years old his father, a carpenter, suffered a fatal hear...

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Travel

South Tahoe renovations enhance off-mountain seasonal fun

As any enthusiast knows well, there is more to the enjoyment of winter sports than skiing or snowboarding.

While many winter resorts make minor upgrades each season, the off-mountain attractions and amenities can be as enticing as the activities on ...

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Stepping Out

'Starcatcher' runs until Jan. 3 in PA

'Starcatcher' runs until Jan. 3 in PA


Kevin Berne/Special to the Town Crier
Adrienne Walters stars as Molly and Tim Homsley portrays Peter in the TheatreWorks production of “Peter and the Starcatcher,” playing through Jan. 3 at Palo Alto’s Lucie Stern Theatre.

TheatreWorks’ producti...

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Spiritual Life

The good news: Christmas means the long wait is over

Ah, Christmas! The stockings are hung by the chimney with care, the presents are set to be given and received, and preparations are underway to be with family.

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Magazine

Christmas At Our House home tour celebrates 26 years

Christmas At Our House home tour celebrates 26 years


Courtesy of Christopher Stark
Homes on the St. Francis High School Women’s Club’s Christmas at Our House Holiday Home Tour showcase a variety of architectural styles.

The days grow short on sunshine but long on nostalgia as the holidays approach...

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Mild Cognitive Dementia: Boosting brain health, reducing risk


Many of us have experienced a “senior moment” – you forget where you parked the car or you can’t quite find the word you want to say. As we age, we notice changes in our ability to remember and worry if it is a sign of normal aging or something more serious, such as dementia. When is it time to be concerned?

There is a gradual continuum of symptoms associated with the development of dementia, starting with the cognitive changes associated with normal aging. In between the two ends of the spectrum is a clinical diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). The Alzheimer’s Association reports that between 10 and 20 percent of Americans over age 65 suffer from MCI.

In 2011, the National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer’s Association collaborated to establish criteria used to diagnose the condition, defined as “cognitive changes serious enough to be noticed by the individuals experiencing them or other people, but not severe enough to interfere with daily life or independent function.” Because is it often difficult to differentiate the symptoms of MCI from those that would be considered “normal,” patients with suspected MCI can undergo a series of neuropsychological memory tests.

A diagnosis of MCI is considered a risk factor for developing Alzheimer’s disease, but that is a far from a certain outcome. Some people with MCI never get worse, and a few actually get better.

Life with MCI can be challenging. Patients and caregivers need to find ways to adapt to varying symptoms and learn new skills for managing the condition. Finding help for this poorly understood condition can be difficult.

Resources for MCI sufferers

A new book, “Living with Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Guide to Maximizing Brain Health and Reducing Risk of Dementia” (Oxford University Press, 2013), is the first written specifically for individuals diagnosed with MCI and their caregivers. It is an invaluable resource filled with practical information that can help the many people impacted by the condition.

Authors Nicole D. Anderson, Kelly J. Murphy and Angela K. Troyer are neuropsychologists who work with MCI patients. Their experience and knowledge shine throughout the book. “Living with Mild Cognitive Impairment” provides an in-depth yet understandable portrait of MCI, including how it differs from dementia, how it is diagnosed and how it is treated.

The final section of the book – “What Can Be Done to Improve Prognosis?” – is perhaps the most valuable. It includes scientifically based strategies for coping with and combating cognitive decline. Diet, exercise, cognitive and social engagement are addressed.

The final chapter, “Memory Strategies,” is full of exercises and tips for improving day-to-day functioning. Case studies throughout the book illustrate concepts, and each chapter offers suggestions for questions to ask the doctor.

Ever wonder what it feels like to experience dementia? Psychologist Richard Taylor compiled a fascinating collection of essays in his book “Alzheimer’s from the Inside Out” (Health Professions Press, 2007). Taylor, diagnosed with Alzheimer’s at age 58, eloquently and candidly chronicles his decline.

Taylor reminds us that those living with dementia are complete human beings with the same desires and needs as anyone else. Diagnosed with probable Alzheimer’s 10 years ago, he has dedicated his life to what he calls “humanizing dementia care.” In addition to his book, he has a website and blog, richardtaylorphd.com, where he invites anyone to contact him. This insightful book is highly recommended for caregivers, both personal and professional, and may even be appropriate for some Alzheimer’s patients.

Both “Living with Mild Cognitive Impairment” and “Alzheimer’s from the Inside Out” can be found on the shelves of Stanford Health Library. To learn more about Mild Cognitive Impairment and dementia prevention, diagnosis and treatment, call, email or stop by a branch. Librarians and trained volunteers will help with research, free of charge.

The main branch of Stanford Health Library is located at Hoover Pavilion, 211 Quarry Road, Suite 201. Other branches are located on the first floor of Stanford Hospital and the main level of Stanford’s Cancer Center.

Nancy Dickenson is head librarian at Stanford Health Library. For more information, call 725-8400 or visit healthlibrary.stanford.edu.

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