Tue07282015

News

Cal Water says no E. coli in water; limits boiling advisory area

Cal Water says no E. coli in water; limits boiling advisory area

Cal Water officials said today that preliminary water quality test results were negative for E. coli were negative and "only a single hydrant" in the South El Monte area of Los Altos showed the presence of total coliform. They reduced the "boil your ...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

Foothill STEM camps offer resources for low-income students

Foothill STEM camps offer resources for low-income students


Sana Khader/Town Crier
Students use software connected to a 3D printer, left, to create a miniature San Francisco, including the Ferry Building, below, at Foothill’s STEM Summer Camps.

Expanding efforts to spark and inspire students’ int...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

Local resident cooks her way from cheerleader to Food Fighters

Local resident cooks her way from cheerleader to Food Fighters


Courtesy of the MacDonald family
Amber MacDonald competes on an episode of “Food Fighters,” scheduled to air 8 p.m. Thursday on NBC.

A newly arrived Los Altos family has an unusually public get-to-know-you moment this week – Amber MacDonald and ...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

Letters to the Editor

Ad-plane flyover marred festival

I hope that other residents who share my concern that the Geico plane flying low over the Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival and our homes for hours on end marred the “fun for everyone” that the Town Crie...

Read more:

Loading...

Special Sections

Heart attack survivor cherishes life after near-death experience

Heart attack survivor cherishes life after near-death experience


Photos Courtesy of Tim Pierce
Los Altos Hills resident Tim Pierce, right with emergency medical responder Steve Crowley, suffered a heart attack in May.

After what Tim Pierce went through recently, no wonder he tries to cherish every moment as if he...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

PAMF debuts cosmetic surgery center

PAMF debuts cosmetic surgery center


John Ho/Special to the Town Crier
The Palo Alto Medical Foundation Center for Cosmetic Surgery at 715 Altos Oaks Drive is the organization’s first center focused solely on cosmetic procedures.

Los Altos’ newest medical office – the...

Read more:

Loading...

Books

Book Signings

• Fritz and Nomi Trapnell have scheduled a book-signing party 4-6 p.m. Aug. 1 at their home, 648 University Ave., Los Altos.

Fritz and his daughter, Dana Tibbitts, co-authored “Harnessing the Sky: Frederick ‘Trap’ Trapnell, ...

Read more:

Loading...

People

CHARLOTTE BARBARA WINGUTH

CHARLOTTE BARBARA WINGUTH

Charlotte Barbara Winguth died July 9 at the young age of 89. She is survived by her 3 daughters Sandy, Karen & Wendi, 5 grandchildren and 2 great grandchildren. She came to Los Altos CA with her husband Ed and 3 children 53 years ago from New ...

Read more:

Loading...

Travel

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories


Eren Göknar/Special to the Town Crier
San Francisco-based humangear Inc. sells totes, tubes and tubs for traveling.

In travel, as in romance, it’s the little things that count.

Beyond the glossy brochures lie the travel discomforts too mun...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

Engineer builds second career as actor

Engineer builds second career as actor


David Allen/Special to the Town Crier
Actors rehearse for Foothill Music Theatre’s “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum.” The cast includes, from left, Tomas Theriot, Todd Wright, Mike Meadors and Ray D’Ambrosio. ...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

Christ Episcopal pastor departs Los Altos for new post in SF

Christ Episcopal pastor departs Los Altos for new post in SF


Courtesy of Sara BoaDwee
Christ Episcopal Church celebrated the ministry of the Rev. Dr. Malcolm Young and his wife, Heidi, at a farewell luau June 28.

Members and friends of Christ Episcopal Church bid farewell June 28 to the Rev. Dr. Malcolm C. Yo...

Read more:

Loading...

Magazine

Inside Mountain View

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
NASA Ames’ Pluto Flyover event kindles the imaginations of young attendees.

Sue Moore watched the July 20, 1969, moon landing beside patients and staff members of the San Francisco hospital where she worked as a nurse...

Read more:

Loading...

Mild Cognitive Dementia: Boosting brain health, reducing risk


Many of us have experienced a “senior moment” – you forget where you parked the car or you can’t quite find the word you want to say. As we age, we notice changes in our ability to remember and worry if it is a sign of normal aging or something more serious, such as dementia. When is it time to be concerned?

There is a gradual continuum of symptoms associated with the development of dementia, starting with the cognitive changes associated with normal aging. In between the two ends of the spectrum is a clinical diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). The Alzheimer’s Association reports that between 10 and 20 percent of Americans over age 65 suffer from MCI.

In 2011, the National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer’s Association collaborated to establish criteria used to diagnose the condition, defined as “cognitive changes serious enough to be noticed by the individuals experiencing them or other people, but not severe enough to interfere with daily life or independent function.” Because is it often difficult to differentiate the symptoms of MCI from those that would be considered “normal,” patients with suspected MCI can undergo a series of neuropsychological memory tests.

A diagnosis of MCI is considered a risk factor for developing Alzheimer’s disease, but that is a far from a certain outcome. Some people with MCI never get worse, and a few actually get better.

Life with MCI can be challenging. Patients and caregivers need to find ways to adapt to varying symptoms and learn new skills for managing the condition. Finding help for this poorly understood condition can be difficult.

Resources for MCI sufferers

A new book, “Living with Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Guide to Maximizing Brain Health and Reducing Risk of Dementia” (Oxford University Press, 2013), is the first written specifically for individuals diagnosed with MCI and their caregivers. It is an invaluable resource filled with practical information that can help the many people impacted by the condition.

Authors Nicole D. Anderson, Kelly J. Murphy and Angela K. Troyer are neuropsychologists who work with MCI patients. Their experience and knowledge shine throughout the book. “Living with Mild Cognitive Impairment” provides an in-depth yet understandable portrait of MCI, including how it differs from dementia, how it is diagnosed and how it is treated.

The final section of the book – “What Can Be Done to Improve Prognosis?” – is perhaps the most valuable. It includes scientifically based strategies for coping with and combating cognitive decline. Diet, exercise, cognitive and social engagement are addressed.

The final chapter, “Memory Strategies,” is full of exercises and tips for improving day-to-day functioning. Case studies throughout the book illustrate concepts, and each chapter offers suggestions for questions to ask the doctor.

Ever wonder what it feels like to experience dementia? Psychologist Richard Taylor compiled a fascinating collection of essays in his book “Alzheimer’s from the Inside Out” (Health Professions Press, 2007). Taylor, diagnosed with Alzheimer’s at age 58, eloquently and candidly chronicles his decline.

Taylor reminds us that those living with dementia are complete human beings with the same desires and needs as anyone else. Diagnosed with probable Alzheimer’s 10 years ago, he has dedicated his life to what he calls “humanizing dementia care.” In addition to his book, he has a website and blog, richardtaylorphd.com, where he invites anyone to contact him. This insightful book is highly recommended for caregivers, both personal and professional, and may even be appropriate for some Alzheimer’s patients.

Both “Living with Mild Cognitive Impairment” and “Alzheimer’s from the Inside Out” can be found on the shelves of Stanford Health Library. To learn more about Mild Cognitive Impairment and dementia prevention, diagnosis and treatment, call, email or stop by a branch. Librarians and trained volunteers will help with research, free of charge.

The main branch of Stanford Health Library is located at Hoover Pavilion, 211 Quarry Road, Suite 201. Other branches are located on the first floor of Stanford Hospital and the main level of Stanford’s Cancer Center.

Nancy Dickenson is head librarian at Stanford Health Library. For more information, call 725-8400 or visit healthlibrary.stanford.edu.

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos