Wed08202014

News

Burglary bump in LAH alarms residents and Sheriff's Office

Los Altos Hills has recorded fewer burglaries than the national and state averages over the past decade, but this year the number of breaking-and-entering crimes has spiked.

Since July 1, the Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Office has recorded 14 resid...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

Community support pays dividends

Community support pays dividends


As a recent cover story in The New York Times Magazine revealed, getting low-income students into college is not enough to close the achievement/income gap. The percentage of low-income students entering college who actually earn a degree lags far ...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

War veteran to visit D.C. memorial on Honor Flight

War veteran to visit D.C. memorial on Honor Flight


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Los Altos resident and World War II vet Earl Pampeyan is preparing for an Honor Flight trip to Washington, D.C., next month.

Los Altos resident Earl Pampeyan is scheduled to fly to Washington, D.C., next month to vis...

Read more:

Loading...

Sports

Making a splash

Making a splash


Courtesy of Clarke Weatherspoon
Stanford Water Polo Club’s under-14 boys team earned the bronze medal at the Junior Olympics. Front row, from left: Corey Tanis, Larsen Weigle, Nathan Puentes, Walker Seymour, Alan Viollier and Jayden Kunwar. B...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

Whom can you trust?: Haugh About That?

Waving my pink poodle skirt with all the fervor of a matador preparing to tease a raging bull, I blinked my 20-year-old eyes and gave a come-hither look to indicate, “I’m ready!” Little did I know that the blind trust I had in this ...

Read more:

Loading...

Special Sections

Getting right by eating right: PAMF doctor's book addresses South Asian health risks

Getting right by eating right: PAMF doctor's book addresses South Asian health risks


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Dr. Ronesh Sinha, a physician at Palo Alto Medical Foundation, promotes healthful living among the South Asian population. His new book, “The South Asian Health Solution,” includes nutritious recipes.

When you think o...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

From Google to First Street: Massage therapist sets up studio in downtown Los Altos

From Google to First Street: Massage therapist sets up studio in downtown Los Altos


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Upuia Ahkiong is slated to open Kua Body Studios next month at 106 First St. Ahkiong is sharing space with Evolve Classical Pilates.

A massage therapist with ties to Google Inc. is slated to open a new – and shared...

Read more:

Loading...

Books

"Jack London" chronicles author's adventurous life


Much has been written about American author Jack London, primarily known for his early-20th-century Western adventure novels, including the classics “White Fang” and “The Call of the Wild.”

In Earle Labor’s biography of the literary icon, “Jac...

Read more:

Loading...

People

TIMOTHY WARREN WATSON (TIM)

TIMOTHY WARREN WATSON (TIM)

Born June 2, 1935, died peacefully on August 11, at home in Mountain View, surrounded by his family. He died of complications of Parkinson’s Disease after a courageous 15-year battle.

Tim was the beloved husband of 55 years to his college sweethea...

Read more:

Loading...

Travel

Bergama bound: A visit to newest World Heritage site

Bergama bound: A visit to newest World Heritage site


Photo Eren GÖknar/ Special to the Town Crier
The amphitheater in Turkey’s ancient city of Pergamon, now known as Bergama, overlooks the Bakirçay River valley, left. The city’s ruins also include the Temple of Trajan.

It was 90 F during t...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

TheatreWorks offers 'Spoonful' of drama beginning this week

TheatreWorks offers 'Spoonful' of drama beginning this week


Kevin Berne/Special to the Town Crier
Three strangers – “Chutes & Ladders” (Anthony J. Haney, left), Odessa (Zilah Mendoza, center) and “Orangutan” (Anna Ishida, right) – come together in an online support group in TheatreWorks’ regional premie...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

Spiritual Briefs

Meditation group meets at Foothills Congregational

A Weekly Meditation Practice group meets 7-8:15 a.m. Tuesdays at Foothills Congregational Church, 461 Orange Ave., Los Altos.

Read more:

Loading...

Magazine

Festival features fun for everyone

Festival features fun for everyone


TOWN CRIER FILE PHOTO
The Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival boasts more than 375 craft and arts booths.

This weekend’s 35th annual Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival promises to be jam-packed with fun activities for just about everyone. The eve...

Read more:

Loading...

Letters to the Editor

API article deemed ‘biased reporting’

As I understand it, the Town Crier’s editorial goal is to help the community resolve differences between the Los Altos School District and Bullis Charter School.

If the Town Crier truly wants to help bring the schools community together, then your staff writer should be oriented to that objective. Biased reporting is not helping in pursuit of that goal.

Upon first reading of Traci Newell’s reporting the 2013 Academic Performance Index results (“Schools keep top rankings despite dip in test scores,” Sept. 4), in paragraph 2, it looks like the district is No. 4 and the charter school No. 14.

Instead, in Newell’s coverage, one would believe that the district placed fourth in the state, and Bullis Charter School ranked as the 14th-highest-scoring elementary school on the 2013 API. Huh?

Why not try to accurately reflect up-front top-performing Bullis Charter School?

Only after reading the entire article did the truth and accuracy finally emerge from paragraph 11: “Bullis Charter School was the top-scoring school in Los Altos, fifth in Santa Clara County and 14th in the state with a score of 989, a five-point decline from last year. In addition to earning the highest-ranking API score in Los Altos, the school is the top-performing charter school in the state.”

If the Town Crier’s goal is to be realized, it’s time to stop the biased reporting and give credit where credit is due. It wouldn’t hurt to start by recognizing that Bullis Charter School is a jewel in the community.

Duffy Price

Los Altos Hills

Editor’s note: The article on API scores chronicled local schools’ scores and how they ranked on the state level. Our reporter mentioned the Los Altos School District’s and Bullis Charter School’s rankings in the same paragraph as a broader statement about schools in the community – with further details later in the story.

Reporting choices are never simple when it comes to covering the local schools debate – and almost guaranteed to draw criticism from one or both sides.

Want a bond measure? Stop the lawsuits

I am puzzled by the Bullis Charter School leadership. Do they really believe that Los Altos School District residents will pass a bond measure that benefits them when they have five outstanding lawsuits against those very same residents?

Realistically, I just can’t see that happening. Last year, a survey showed only lukewarm support for a bond measure, and when respondents were told that the bond measure might benefit Bullis, support dropped even further.

So, what to do? For starters, ending the lawsuits immediately might help. Voters in June 2014 (I believe that’s the earliest a bond measure could be placed on the ballot) would have had only nine months in which to forget the lawsuits – and nine months might not be enough time.

Ending the lawsuits would free up however much the charter school pays its attorneys annually ($1 million? $2 million? More?). Bullis Charter School could then offer this for a site in the spirit of cooperation and sharing. (Note that other charter schools in California have bought and constructed their own facilities entirely out of their own pocket, completely eliminating any district involvement.)

Absent dropping the lawsuits and absent a substantial contribution toward a new school for Bullis, I don’t see any chance that a bond measure would pass.

Vladimir G. Ivanovic

Los Altos

Mountain View growing too much

The Mountain View City Council has thrown a bomb on local residents. The bomb has exploded with shrapnel in the form of:

• Encouraging and making way for developers to build high-rise apartments and businesses with no forethought on its real future impact to our city.

• Forcing small businesses out of business.

• Approving substantially reduced required parking for the new structures.

• Failing to provide adequate parking in the downtown area.

• Creating congestion through the narrowing of El Camino Real and Castro Street to force Mountain View residents to ride bicycles.

• “Manhattanizing” Mountain View by creating canyons of buildings throughout the city.

And the list goes on.

Sadly, all of these problems apply not only to Mountain View, but also to the entire Peninsula.

Please answer these questions:

• How will people grocery shop on bicycles or get to doctors appointments without cars? How will people with disabilities get around? We have no viable public transportation. Valley Transportation Authority is not the answer. We would need a reliable, extensive and inexpensive mode of public transportation in place before and if this development is forced through.

• Why are city governments allowing the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) to continue this insane onslaught of development? Why aren’t they fighting ABAG’s so-called requirements? Why is there a push to make Mountain View and the Bay Area like Manhattan?

What we can learn from looking at these huge cities is that fast-track building with no forethought to real future impact does not work.

Psychological studies have proven over and over that when more people are stuffed into a limited space, the results are more violent crimes, a decline in overall health and an increase in the already great divide between rich and poor.

Why do you want to create this in Mountain View and on the Peninsula? This is neither green nor sustainable.

Denise Pinto

Mountain View

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos