Sat04182015

News

Car breaks through glass door, closes Trader Joe’s for the day

Car breaks through glass door, closes Trader Joe’s for the day

Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Trader Joe's employees survey the damage after a car smashed through the glass doorway earlier today.

Trader Joe’s on Homestead Road is closed for the remainder of the day (April 17) after a car barreled through the glas...

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Schools

Pinewood student writes book about living with autism

Pinewood student writes book about living with autism


Traci Newell/Town Crier
Pinewood School senior Georgia Lyon wrote and illustrated “How to Be Human: Diary of an Autistic Girl” in 2013.

Although first published under a pseudonym, Pinewood School student Georgia Lyon is stepping out to ...

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Community

Sale offers opportunity to 'discover' jewels, fight cancer

Sale offers opportunity to 'discover' jewels, fight cancer

Volunteers and staff at the American Cancer Society's Discovery Shop in downtown Los Altos urge shoppers to "Be A Gem, Buy A Jewel" during the shop's special sale this Friday (April 17) and Saturday (April 18).

The sale is an opportunity to find Mot...

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Comment

Editorial: Let's assume not to presume

Two recent downtown Los Altos stories offer lessons in the drawbacks of jumping to conclusions.

A few months back, the Town Crier published an article on Ladera Autoworks on First Street closing its doors. That part was true, but the reason was not....

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Special Sections

Fitness focus: No holds barred for Los Altos sisters

Fitness focus: No holds barred for Los Altos sisters


Photos Courtesy of Barre 3
Gillian Brotherson, kneeling at left, guides studio instructors through a workout at barre3 Los Altos.

Health is all about balance. That’s what two Los Altos natives learned as they navigated work, motherhood and welln...

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Business

Steinway gallery brings pianos, musicians to downtown Los Altos

Steinway gallery brings pianos, musicians to downtown Los Altos


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Chrissy Huang, manager of Steinway Piano Gallery in Los Altos, showcases Steinway & Sons’ signature instruments. The gallery plans to host concerts with performers tickling the ivories.

A new downtown Los Altos bus...

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Books

'Pope Joan' Book weaves tale around legend of female pontiff

'Pope Joan' Book weaves tale around legend of female pontiff


The idea that there may have a female pope at one time in history has generated much speculation throughout the centuries. “Pope Joan” (Crown, 1996) by Donna Woolfolk Cross, does not answer the question; rather, the author has created a detai...

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People

GREG STAHLER

GREG STAHLER

Greg Stahler died unexpecdly in his home in Belmont on March 26, 2015. (He was born in Mountain View on June 23, 1972). He will really be missed by three beautiful young children, Haley 7, Hannah 5, and Tyler 3, and his wife Kathryn. He will also b...

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Travel

Cuba libre: Local residents join mad rush of travelers

Cuba libre: Local residents join mad rush of travelers


Natalie Elefant/Special to the Town Crier
Los Altos resident Natalie Elefant noted the vibrant street performances as a traveler in Cuba.

The U.S. restored diplomatic relations with Cuba late last year, enabling Americans to import $100 worth of cig...

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Stepping Out

'Those Darn Squirrels' invading Mountain View

'Those Darn Squirrels' invading Mountain View


Courtesy of Lyn Flaim Healy/ Spotlight Moments Photography
Noelle Merino stars in Peninsula Youth Theatre’s “Those Darn Squirrels.”

The Peninsula Youth Theatre’s world premiere adaptation of “Those Darn Squirrels” is scheduled Friday and Saturda...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

Food for thought: Hidden Villa programs offer teens training in sustainability on the farm

Food for thought: Hidden Villa programs offer teens training in sustainability on the farm


/Town Crier It’s not all cute and cuddly for teens participating in the eight-week Animal Husbandry Apprenticeship program at Hidden Villa in Los Altos Hills. Mia Mosing of Palo Alto, left, and Sophia Jackson of Los Altos clean the pigpens – one of...

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Inside Mountain View

Home for disabled youth yields greener pastures

Home for disabled youth yields greener pastures


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Green Pastures staff member JP Mercada, below right, helps Tommy, who lives at the group home, sort through papers and organize his room.

Tucked in the corner of a quiet residential cul-de-sac in Mountain View, Green Pastur...

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Facilities meetings cover short-term conflicts

Subsets of the Bullis Charter School and Los Altos School District boards met twice last week, tentatively forging a collaborative relationship to address outstanding facilities conflicts.

The boards broke their discussions into two parts: short-term and long-term issues. Last week’s meetings focused on Bullis Charter School officials’ short-term concerns regarding the district’s Facilities Use Agreement (FUA).

The district and the charter school haggled over terms of the FUA, which charter school officials ultimately signed at the eleventh hour to ensure access to their shared site at Blach Intermediate School ahead of the new school year. The FUA imposes grade-level restrictions on the charter school’s Blach campus and sets capacity limits for both Blach and the charter school’s Egan Junior High School site.

Charter school board members John Phelps and Joe Hurd represented Bullis Charter School at the meetings, and Los Altos School District Trustees Mark Goines and Steve Taglio represented the district. The Los Altos Community Foundation sponsored professional mediator Geoff Ball, and Los Altos Mayor Jarrett Fishpaw hosted the meetings, held Tuesday and Thursday in the Los Altos City Council Chambers.

Collaboration and compromise

A good deal of discussion centered on what it means to collaborate and compromise.

“We are looking for some support for the burden we have taken on,” Phelps said. “We have taken quite a burden by splitting up our program. We are looking for a little bit of cooperation.”

Taglio said he is concerned about how the charter school’s requests might affect the community at large.

“It’s the ripple effect,” he said. “I’m worried about the rest of the community. You’re 12 percent of school-aged children – that comes down to less than 5 percent of the community we service. It’s the families that live there, it’s those issues as well.”

Taglio said compromise must come from both sides.

“We are the only school in this town that is on two campuses four miles apart,” Hurd said in response. “It’s a little difficult for me to say I need to compromise more. I’m not saying this is the only compromise (the charter school) community can make, but that is a pretty big one.”

Phelps said he hopes the district will address the charter school’s concerns.

“We are now bumped up against some quite minor constraints,” he said. “I think we can solve these minor constraints without further compromising the Bullis Charter School program.”

Hammering out the details

Goines said the district board needs to understand the specifics of Bullis’ program on the Blach campus before trustees vote on the charter school’s proposed changes to the FUA.

Charter school officials presented additional data points for the district trustees to take back to their board. They said enrollment on the Blach campus would never exceed 175 students, and multigrade groupings would rotate on the campus. Officials emphasized that each charter school student would have only one drop-off and one pickup at the Blach campus per day.

Charter school representatives reported their grade-level caps at Blach: fewer than 90 K-3 students on campus at one time, fewer than 150 fourth- through sixth-graders and fewer than 100 seventh- and eighth-graders.

The K-6 students would begin their school day at 8:45 a.m. and end either at 2:30 p.m. or 3:30 p.m. Junior-highers would start at 8 a.m. and end at 3:30 p.m.

District trustees asked for clarification on how the charter school planned to use the shared space with so many grade levels on the Blach campus. The charter school outlined how it would need rainy-day access for all 175 students in either the gym or multipurpose room as well as access to the home economics room for fourth- through eighth-graders.

Regarding outdoor space, charter school officials asked for fourth- and fifth-grade access to the outdoor shared facilities. In an attempt to assuage the district’s concerns about their ability to provide a safe play space for K-3 students, charter school officials asked for space in front of the adjoined Stepping Stones Preschool to build a play structure for younger students – at the charter school’s expense. Bullis Charter School representatives also requested access to the sloped grass space on the street side of the track for the younger students’ play area.

Moving forward

Goines said the district would review the charter school’s proposed amendments to the FUA, particularly as they relate to California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) mandates. The district, he added, must ensure that the charter school’s requested changes do not affect the latest addendum to the CEQA study on the Blach and Egan campuses.

Charter school board members urged the district trustees to reach a decision on their requests by their next board meeting, scheduled Monday. Goines called the timeline “optimistic,” suggesting instead that a decision by their Sept. 23 board meeting – after the upcoming long-term facilities discussions – would be more realistic.

Los Altos Hills City Councilman John Radford warned district trustees that if they don’t approve the charter school’s requests before the long-term meetings, then there won’t be much to discuss. The town of Los Altos Hills is scheduled to host the long-term facilities meetings this week.

“If we are in our chambers on Sept. 12 and there is no agreement, I can’t see long-term discussions going much of anywhere,” Radford said. “Mayor (Gary) Waldeck and I might not see the point of doing it. There is nothing tonight that should stop you from accommodating Bullis Charter School if you want a bond passed. We’ve got to get onto bigger stuff. This can be solved and should be solved.”

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