Wed07292015

News

Cal Water says no E. coli in water; limits boiling advisory area

Cal Water says no E. coli in water; limits boiling advisory area

Cal Water officials said today that preliminary water quality test results were negative for E. coli were negative and "only a single hydrant" in the South El Monte area of Los Altos showed the presence of total coliform. They reduced the "boil your ...

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Schools

BCS hosts Stretch to Kindergarten program for underserved youth

BCS hosts Stretch to Kindergarten program for underserved youth


Traci Newell/Town Crier
The six-week, tuition-free Stretch to Kindergarten program, hosted at Bullis Charter School, serves children who have not attended preschool. A teacher leads children in singing about the parts of a butterfly, above.

Local un...

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Community

Google car painting project calls on artists

Google car painting project calls on artists


Google self-driving car

Already known as an innovator in the tech field, Google Inc. is now moving in on the art world.

The Mountain View-based company July 11 launched the “Paint the Town” contest, a “moving art experiment” that invites Califo...

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Sports

Pedaling with a purpose

Pedaling with a purpose


courtesy of
Rishi Bommannan Rishi Bommannan cycled from Bates College in Maine to his home in Los Altos Hills, taking several selfies along the way. He also raised nearly $13,000 for the Livestrong Foundation, which supports cancer patients.

When R...

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Comment

The truth about coyotes: Other Voices

The Town Crier’s recent article on coyotes venturing down from the foothills in search of sustenance referenced the organization Project Coyote (“Recent coyote attacks keep residents on edge,” July 1). Do not waste your time contac...

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Special Sections

Grant Park senior program made permanent

Grant Park senior program made permanent


Photos by Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Local residents participate in an exercise class at the Grant Park Senior Center, above. Betsy Reeves, below left with Gail Enenstein, lobbied for senior programming in south Los Altos.

It all began when Betsy Reev...

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Business

New State Street rug retailer has downtown Los Altos covered

New State Street rug retailer has downtown Los Altos covered


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Los Altos Rug Gallery owner Fahim Karimi stocks his State Street store with a wall-to-wall array of floor coverings.

A new downtown business owner plans to roll out the red carpet – along with rugs of every other color –...

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Books

Book Signings

• Fritz and Nomi Trapnell have scheduled a book-signing party 4-6 p.m. Aug. 1 at their home, 648 University Ave., Los Altos.

Fritz and his daughter, Dana Tibbitts, co-authored “Harnessing the Sky: Frederick ‘Trap’ Trapnell, ...

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People

GRACE WILSON FRANKS

GRACE WILSON FRANKS

Resident of Los Altos

Grace Wilson Franks, our beloved mother and grandmother, left us peacefully on July 16, 2015 just a few weeks short of her 92nd birthday. She was born to Ross and Florence (Cruzan) Wilson in rural Tulare, California on Septem...

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Travel

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories


Eren Göknar/Special to the Town Crier
San Francisco-based humangear Inc. sells totes, tubes and tubs for traveling.

In travel, as in romance, it’s the little things that count.

Beyond the glossy brochures lie the travel discomforts too mun...

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Stepping Out

Going out with a 'Bang'

Going out with a 'Bang'


Richard Mayer/Special to the Town Crier
“Chitty Chitty Bang Bang” stars, clockwise from top left, Alexander Sanchez, Sophia Sturiale, Deborah Rosengaus and Danny Martin.

Los Altos Stage Company and Los Altos Youth Theatre’s joint production of t...

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Spiritual Life

Build a 'light' house and get out of that dark place

Most of us have a place inside our hearts and minds that occasionally causes us trouble. For some, it is sadness, depression or despair. For others, it may be fear, anger, resentment or myriad other emotional “dark places” that at times seem to hij...

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Magazine

Inside Mountain View

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
NASA Ames’ Pluto Flyover event kindles the imaginations of young attendees.

Sue Moore watched the July 20, 1969, moon landing beside patients and staff members of the San Francisco hospital where she worked as a nurse...

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Hidden Villa summer camps preserve legacy of social justice


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Hidden Villa camper Lily Ballow, 11, cleans the pigpen, one of her daily farm chores.

When the metal gates of Hidden Villa swing open to campers each summer, eager youth descend on the 1,600-acre campus in Los Altos Hills for an experience that plants the seeds of social justice.

Those social-justice roots run deep: Hidden Villa pioneered the first multiracial camp in the U.S. in 1945. Frank and Josephine Duveneck developed the summer-camp program with an eye to promoting multicultural social activism and environmental education.

The Duveneck family purchased Hidden Villa in 1924, aspiring to create an environment that transcended cultural, racial, social and economic barriers. They provided an example by condemning racism and providing safe refuge for Jews fleeing the Nazis and Japanese-Americans returning from internment camps.

“What (the Duvenecks) were doing while building community was also allowing these kids to have shared experiences with one another,” said Daniel Chmielewski, Hidden Villa community programs manager.

Long-standing tradition

Hidden Villa continues to uphold its original mission by hosting summer-camp participants from many different backgrounds.

According to camp director Nikki Bryant, approximately half of all campers receive scholarships, a gift that allows youth from diverse neighborhoods across the Bay Area to venture to the farm’s rural environs for a day, a week or even longer. The Town Crier Holiday Fund supports Hidden Villa and its camp scholarships.

The camp environment allows young people to discover themselves and experience personal growth through reflection and goal setting.

“It’s really a nonjudgmental place where you can be yourself,” said 17-year-old Steffan Salas of Menlo Park, who completed his second year of counselor training at Hidden Villa this summer.

Salas, like many of the older campers at Hidden Villa, has found a family among the counselors and campers he’s met and plans to pay it forward as a counselor next year.

With an 80 percent retention rate, it is not uncommon for youth to spend 11 or 12 summers at Hidden Villa before assuming leadership roles.

Seth “Simba” Simas returned to Hidden Villa after earning his teaching credential four years ago and currently serves as program head for residential and backpacking camps at Hidden Villa. As a former camper, he committed himself to the experience not only to boost his skills as a youth worker, but also to instill values that encourage campers to care about the world around them.

Simas’ impact on campers is evident in the ways they translate the social and environmental values learned at camp into action. One camper, Simas said, contacted a Subway representative to request that the sandwich chain buy locally grown produce for its franchise locations.

Deeper meaning

The Hidden Villa camp experience goes beyond hiking and toasting marshmallows. Residential camp participants immerse themselves in a sustainable community and are accountable for shaping their own experiences.

Activities center on five key areas: the Duveneck Legacy; Race and Class; Gender, Sexuality and Family; the Environment; and Farm and Food. Older youth are assigned chores like milking goats and gardening. Opportunities for reflection are built into the daily schedule.

For younger participants accustomed to living in urban enclaves, farm work and encounters with nature prove enlightening. But the most critical and enduring element of camp, according to Bryant, is the building of relationships and the meaningful conversations that follow.

“What this summer camp does in particular is let people connect to people – the opportunity to talk with one another, resolve conflict and be confident in what you do,” she said.

Bryant said building and coordinating the right team of program leaders and counselors for the summer camp programs – ranging from day camps for elementary-school-aged children to multiday backpacking hikes through the Santa Cruz Mountains for teenagers – is akin to directing an orchestra. Although some of the camps’ successes are linked to months and years of planning and training, it’s the passion of dedicated counselors that makes it a transformational experience, she added.

“We work with staff to teach them how to be educators so that they can facilitate these conversations on weighty topics,” said Bryant, noting that many parents observe that their children return from camp with a more mature and confident perspective on the world.

Bryant believes that when you connect with youth at their level, it sparks their curiosity and triggers critical thinking in a way that can lead to success later in life.

“That circle of giving is what makes peace in our world,” she said. “And that is ultimately what we’re trying to do – bring about peace, to educate people to think about this world and ask questions.”

For more information, call 949-8850 or visit hiddenvilla.org.


Hidden Villa Summer Camps - Photos by Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier

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