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News

Police stress need for low speed in school zones

Police stress need for low speed in school zones


Town Crier File Photo
After two recent accidents involving cyclists and motorists, police urge caution – on both sides.

After two recent incidents of vehicles striking student bicyclists, Los Altos Police urge residents to exercise caution whe...

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Schools

Gardner Bullis School debuts new Grizzly Student Center

Gardner Bullis School debuts new Grizzly Student Center


Photo by Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Students line up to check books out of the library in the new Grizzly Student Center at Gardner Bullis School.

Gardner Bullis School opened its new Grizzly Student Center earlier this month, introducing a lea...

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Community

Home improvement workshop scheduled Wednesday (Oct. 29)

The County of Santa Clara is hosting a free informational workshop on 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at Los Altos Hills Town Hall, 26379 Fremont Road.

The workshop will offer ways single-family homeowners can increase their homes’ energy efficiency. Eligible i...

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Comment

Off the fence: TC recommends 'yes' on N

The Town Crier initially offered no position on the controversial $150 million Measure N bond on Tuesday’s ballot. But some of the reasons we gave in our Oct. 15 editorial were, on reflection, overly critical and based on inaccurate information.

We ...

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Special Sections

Long-term solutions emerge as water conservation goes mainstream

Long-term solutions emerge as water conservation goes mainstream


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Forrest Linebarger, right, installed greywater and rainwater harvesting systems at his Los Altos Hills home.

With more brown than green visible in her Los Altos backyard, Kacey Fitzpatrick admits that she’s a little e...

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Business

Local realtors scare up money for charity

Local realtors scare up money for charity


Photo courtesy of SILVAR
Realtors Gary Campi and Jordan Legge, from left, joined Nancy Domich, SILVAR President Dave Tonna and Joe Brown to raise funds for the Silicon Valley Realtors Charitable Foundation.

Los Altos and Mountain View realtors raise...

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Books

Helping kids catch a few Zs: Local dental hygienist pens meditative bedtime book

Helping kids catch a few Zs: Local dental hygienist pens meditative bedtime book


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Mimi Sommers, who works at a Los Altos dentist’s office, recently wrote a children’s book.

A local dental hygienist recently published a book that aims to ease parents and children during a sometimes anxious e...

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People

DAVID S. NIVISON

DAVID S. NIVISON

David S. Nivison, 91 years old, and a resident of Los Altos, California since 1952, died Oct. 16, 2014 at home.  His neighbors had recently honored him as the “Mayor of Russell Ave., in recognition of 62 years of distinguished living” on that ...

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Travel

Falling leaves: Four places in California to see autumn colors

Falling leaves: Four places in California to see autumn colors


Courtesy of Castello di Amorosa
Castello di Amorosa in Calistoga, above, boasts a beautiful setting for viewing fall’s colors – and sampling the vineyard’s wines.

Yes, Virginia, there is fall in California.

The colors pop out in...

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Stepping Out

ECYS opens season Sunday

ECYS opens season Sunday


Ramya Krishna/Special to the Town Crier
The El Camino Youth Symphony rehearses for Sunday’s concert, above.

The El Camino Youth Symphony – under new conductor Jindong Cai – is scheduled to perform its season-opening concert 4 p.m....

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Spiritual Life

Christian Science Reading Room hosts webinar on prayer and healing

Christian Science practitioner and teacher Evan Mehlenbacher is scheduled to present a live Internet webinar lecture, “Prayer That Heals,” 7:30 p.m. Nov. 14 in the Christian Science Reading Room, 60 Main St., Los Altos.

Those interested ...

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Magazine

Local events add color to autumn calendar

Local events add color to autumn calendar


Van Houtte/town crier Visitors make their way through the Children’s Alley.

As Los Altos’ signature Chinese Pistache trees exchange their summer green for vibrant hues of yellow, orange and red in the fall, an abundance of local events also ad...

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Slow down LA City Council rejects proposed speed-limit increases


Ellie Van Houtte/ Town Crier
The Los Altos City Council last week rejected proposed speed-limit increases on a number of city streets. Mayor Jarrett Fishpaw said it’s up to residents to set a good example and adhere to the law.

The Los Altos City Council last week put the brakes on a proposal to raise speed limits on several city roads.

The Aug. 13 decision came after a city traffic survey – conducted in late 2012 through early 2013 – resulted in a proposal to increase speeds by 5 mph on 18 of 19 city road segments. One segment along Grant Road – ending at Homestead Road – called for a 10 mph hike, from 25 to 35 mph.

Prior to rejecting the proposal, Councilwoman Val Carpenter called speed-limit increases “an endless upward spiral.”

“To me, what’s much more important is to have our residential streets be as safe as possible for pedestrians and bicyclists – especially children traveling to and from school – than to increase through-put for commuters,” she said.

The survey was required under California Vehicle Code and California Manual for Uniform Traffic Control Devices regulations mandating the re-examination of city speed limits at five-, seven- and 10-year intervals. Proposed speed limits, according to a city staff report, are determined “at the nearest 5 mph increment to the 85th percentile speed of (observed) free-flowing traffic” on affected road segments. Per state regulations, cities can reduce determined speed limits by no more than 5 mph based on factors such as a road’s accident rates.

The report also noted that state regulations require a valid traffic study – and that cities approve speed-limit adjustments – prior to radar enforcement by police. The only speed enforcement method currently available to police is “pacing,” which requires a police officer to trail a violator to measure speed.

Public reaction

More than 20 residents spoke out against the proposed speed increases at the council meeting. Several of them cited safety for pedestrians and bicyclists – and particularly children – as their top concern.

Cuesta Drive resident Roger Hayes called for the installation of a radar feedback sign as a traffic-calming measure instead of raising his street’s posted speed from 25 to 30 mph.

“(Drivers) hit the brake pedal when they see that flashing 25 (mph sign),” Hayes said. “It’s miraculous. … We think it’ll work. We think it’ll ease the burden on the police department and it’ll make all of the problems go away.”

Covington Road resident Geoffrey Spencer – the father of four – noted that it was “sad that 85 percent of the people driving down my street are going 10 mph or higher” than the posted speed limit.

“I think that even if we’re going to keep the speed limit where it is, something needs to be done to slow people down,” he said, suggesting the use of a radar feedback sign as a potential traffic-calming device for his street.

Cameron Hamblin, another Covington Road resident, added that commuters cutting through Los Altos are partly to blame for excessive speeds.

“(Speed-limit increases) will only benefit the people who live outside of this town,” Hamblin said.

Los Altos Environmental Commissioner Gary Hedden, speaking on his own behalf, offered potential measures to reduce speeds, such as narrower roadways that force drivers to slow down.

“It’s harder to go fast in a narrow space, especially if you’re texting,” he said, drawing chuckles from those in attendance.

He added that raising speed limits to allow enforcement by radar “defies common sense.” He encouraged residents to voice their concerns to state lawmakers in an effort to change state requirements.

Council says no

Councilmembers appeared united in their opposition to the proposed speed-limit increases.

Councilwoman Megan Satterlee told residents that while she wasn’t supporting an increase to current speed limits, she was interested in re-examining the possibility of raising the limits from 25 to 30 mph along Grant Road and one section of Fremont Avenue – between Grant and Highway 85 – in the future.

“The way those roads are set up, I think they can support 30 mph, so it’s worth the discussion,” she said.

Mayor Jarrett Fishpaw cautioned that the council would go through the same exercise in future years because of the city’s requirements as set forth by the state. He added that it’s the responsibility of residents to set a good example.

“I think it’s important to note that a lot of the people who are driving on streets near your homes are individuals who live near your homes. … It is us in these cars who are traveling above the speed limit,” he said.

Carpenter added that the speed-limit issue begins with the law itself.

“I just want you all to understand here that the real villain is not the city staff or the city council, it’s the state’s 85th-percentile rule that basically lets the fastest drivers set the speed limits on our residential streets,” she said. “That’s kind of like the fox guarding the henhouse.”

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