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News

Loyola Corners economics, traffic rise to top of planning concerns

Loyola Corners economics, traffic rise to top of planning concerns

Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Loyola Bridge construction parallel to the Fremont Avenue frontage may lead officials to alter circulation plans for the area.

Loyola Corners stakeholders last week mulled the issues that will likely shape the area&rsquo...

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Schools

LAHS Green Team commemorates Earth Week

LAHS Green Team commemorates Earth Week


Traci Newell/Town Crier
Los Altos High School Green Team members, above, quiz their classmates about water conservation. The club distributed plants as prizes during the club’s Earth Week activities.

Members of the Los Altos High School Green...

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Community

Local pianist, 11, slated to perform Saturday at statewide competition

Local pianist, 11, slated to perform Saturday at statewide competition


Courtesy of the Cha family
Spencer Cha plays piano at a Santa Clara University recital. The sixth-grader also enjoys soccer, tennis, golf and skiing.

Spencer Cha has come a long way since he first sat down at the piano at age 2.

“I remem...

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Sports

Spartans net second place, eye top prize next season

Spartans net second place, eye top prize next season


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Jeremy Hsu, Mountain View High’s top singles player, competes against Pinewood Thursday. The Spartans won the match 7-0.

With freshmen playing the top three spots in singles, the future of the Mountain View High boy...

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Comment

Los Altos at a leadership crossroads: Editorial

Don’t look now, but there could be some major changes ahead regarding how the Los Altos city government is run.

The current city council has the opportunity to hire a new city manager in the wake of Marcia Somers’ recent resignation. Fur...

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Special Sections

How to personalize the wedding bar

How to personalize the wedding bar


Christine Moore/Special to the Town Crier
A seasonal signature cocktail adds interest beyond the standard wedding bar’s spirits and mixers. Focus on one set of fresh ingredients, such as blueberries, blackberries and mint for a dose of budget...

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Business

Farmers prepare to market season's bounty

Farmers prepare to market season's bounty


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Journeyman farmer Jen Friedlander waters Hidden Villa’s greenhouse plants, which will grow stronger in the controlled indoor environment before being transferred to the field outdoors.

Around Hidden Villa, the gree...

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People

BUOL JOANNE DOUGHERTY

BUOL JOANNE DOUGHERTY

1930-2016

Heaven gained a beautiful angel today. Our beloved mother’s blessed life ended in her Los Altos home surrounded by her loving family on April 18, 2016.

Buol Joanne Dougherty was born Sept. 28, 1930 in Chicago. At the age of two, M...

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Stepping Out

'Catch' comes to conclusion LA Stage Co. comedy  ends run this weekend

'Catch' comes to conclusion LA Stage Co. comedy ends run this weekend


Richard Mayer/Special to the Town Crier
Bryan Moriarty, left, stars as Yossarian and John Stephen King plays the Psychiatrist in Los Altos Stage Company’s “Catch-22.”

Los Altos Stage Company’s presentation of “Catch...

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Spiritual Life

Health advice from one man to another


Courtesy of nymedicaldoctor.com
By the time men reach the age of 40, they begin to suffer the consequences of neglecting their health, including high blood pressure. The “psychology of maleness” plays a factor.

As a man and an internal medicine doctor, I wonder what drives some men to lead unhealthy lives.

Why do many men only come in for their physicals after their wives schedule their exams? Why will most men only read this column after a family member has shared it with them? Why do some of my most successful, intelligent, driven male patients have so little motivation to improve their health?

In this column, I’ll discuss the “psychology of maleness” and review the three stages of male health breakdown.

Let’s start with three key components of the male psyche.

• Denial. Think back to your college days when you felt invincible. You could eat a large pizza and barely gain a pound. You could pull consecutive all-nighters and recover quickly. As we age, our bodies change. If you’re regularly staying up late and eating and drinking at free will on business trips and on weekends, you’ll end up paying a price.

• Internalization. Part of being a guy is taking the hits and moving on. There may be personal and professional obstacles causing tremendous emotional stress, but we usually internalize them and move on. Stored up tension and anxiety manifest in other ways, such as poor sleep and eating habits. Unfortunately, this behavior also increases the risk of heart disease. Having someone to share with, whether it’s your spouse, a family member, a close friend, a co-worker or a professional therapist, can help blow off pent-up steam. Exercise and meditation are other ways to cope with internalized stress.

• The male ego. This can be a tough one. I had to set aside my own male ego to write this column. Many of us guys know that our lifestyles and habits aren’t optimal, but we resist advice from others, especially spouses and close family members. Advice with good intentions turns into “nagging,” and sometimes our behaviors are almost defiant. If this describes you, then schedule an appointment with your doctor. Most guys are OK with having their doctor tell them what to do.

Stages of deterioration

In general, it’s between ages 35 and 40 that things start breaking down in men who neglect their health. It’s happening earlier as we become increasingly sedentary and unhealthy.

I’ve broken the deterioration of the male body into three stages:

• Stage 1. If your waistline is expanding and you’re suffering more aches and pains, these are warning signs of premature aging and future problems, not a normal part of getting older. This accelerated aging is due to increased stress, decreased activity and a poor diet.

• Stage 2. Abnormal biometrics. In addition to your weight and waistline being abnormal, your other critical numbers like blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar are now out of range.

• Stage 3. This is a significant health event, resulting from poor lifestyle choices and being stubborn enough to ignore the stage 1 and 2 signs. For example, you might receive a diagnosis of diabetes, a heart attack or a herniated disk from being overweight and out of shape.

I often ask older patients, “When you reflect back on your life, what things would you have done differently?” Answers are typically, “I wish I took better care of my health,” or “I wish I spent more time with my family.” No one has ever said they wish they had worked more hours, made more money or exercised less.

Minimize your future regrets by prioritizing your health now and by being a role model for your family. Please don’t wait for stages 2 or 3 to start making changes.

Dr. Ronesh Sinha is an internal medicine physician at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation. He also provides medical consults to high-risk South Asians.

The Palo Alto Medical Foundation and column editor Arian Dasmalchi provide this monthly column.

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