Tue09302014

News

Meet the Santa Clara Valley Water District Board of Directors candidates

Meet the Santa Clara Valley Water District Board of Directors candidates

Two candidates have filed to run for the District 7 seat on the Santa Clara Valley Water District Board of Directors in the Nov. 4 election. The water district, established in 1929, oversees and protects water resources in Santa Clara County....

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Schools

New LAHS assistant principal focuses on school activities

New LAHS assistant principal focuses on school activities


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Suzanne Woolfolk, assistant principal at Los Altos High, teaches a leadership course for Associated Student Body leaders.

Suzanne Woolfolk – new assistant principal at Los Altos High School – said she is happy...

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Community

Petting zoo, car show highlight Chamber's annual Fall Festival

Petting zoo, car show highlight Chamber's annual Fall Festival


Courtesy of Los Altos Chamber of Commerce
The petting zoo is a highlight of the Los Altos Fall Festival. This year’s event is slated Oct. 4 and 5.

The Los Altos Chamber of Commerce has scheduled its 23rd annual Fall Festival 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oc...

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Sports

Burlingame bowls over Los Altos

Burlingame bowls over Los Altos


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Los Altos High halfback Sean Lanoza looks for running room against Burlingame in Saturday’s home opener.

The opening drive of Saturday’s game against Burlingame couldn’t have gone much better for the Los Altos High fo...

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Comment

Does Los Altos have a parking problem, or is it a symptom? : Other Voices

Yes, and yes. It appears that the downtown Los Altos parking problem is a symptom of the city’s “Sarah Winchester” approach to planning that instead of resulting in staircases to nowhere resulted in a hotel without parking required by code.(1)

From ...

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Special Sections

Los Altos landmark Four families later, Shoup House goes on the market

Los Altos landmark Four families later, Shoup House goes on the market


Courtesy of Matthew Anello
The Shoup House dining room, above, features original elements. The 100-year-old house on University Avenue earned a spot on the National Register of Historic Places, a nod to its legacy as the home of city founder Paul S...

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Business

Longtime banker readies for retirement

Longtime banker readies for retirement


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Joanne Kavalaris is retiring at the end of October after spending the past 25 years of her banking career in downtown Los Altos.

A longtime Los Altos banker is calling it a career in a few weeks.

Joanne Kavalaris, Bank o...

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Books

A woman's perspective on the Greatest Generation

A woman's perspective on the Greatest Generation


During World War II, Virgilia Short Witzel, a young mother and U.S. Navy officer’s wife, grappled on the home front in Menlo Park with wartime rationing, shortages and loneliness. During the ensuing Cold War, she experienced adventure and misadventur...

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People

VINCENT (TIM) MURPHY JR.

VINCENT (TIM) MURPHY JR.

July 27, 1953 – August 12, 2014

Native Los Altan died Medford, OR. Graduated Bellarmine Prep. Married Josephine Domino, 1950. Licensed Auto Mechanic, Private Pilot, skilled Computer Scientist. Tim “could fix anything”. Afflicted with cancer 2001. ...

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Travel

Taking a Turkey trek: Winging it during the World Cup

Taking a Turkey trek: Winging it during the World Cup


Rich Robertson/Special to the Town Crier
The sun sets over the Aegean Sea in Bodrum, Turkey, left.

Tours that whisk you from Istanbul to Bodrum in 11 days are as plentiful as souvenir hawkers in Turkey, but traveling from the Blue Mosque to Topkapi ...

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Stepping Out

Pear builds wonderful 'House'

Pear builds wonderful 'House'


J. Smith/Special to the Town Crier
Betsy Kruse Craig portrays Trish in the Pear Avenue Theatre production of “House,” which closes Oct. 5.

Mountain View’s Pear Avenue Theatre is staging an unusual theater-going experience – producing two plays...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

Local events add color to autumn calendar

Local events add color to autumn calendar


Van Houtte/town crier Visitors make their way through the Children’s Alley.

As Los Altos’ signature Chinese Pistache trees exchange their summer green for vibrant hues of yellow, orange and red in the fall, an abundance of local events also add ...

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Health advice from one man to another


Courtesy of nymedicaldoctor.com
By the time men reach the age of 40, they begin to suffer the consequences of neglecting their health, including high blood pressure. The “psychology of maleness” plays a factor.

As a man and an internal medicine doctor, I wonder what drives some men to lead unhealthy lives.

Why do many men only come in for their physicals after their wives schedule their exams? Why will most men only read this column after a family member has shared it with them? Why do some of my most successful, intelligent, driven male patients have so little motivation to improve their health?

In this column, I’ll discuss the “psychology of maleness” and review the three stages of male health breakdown.

Let’s start with three key components of the male psyche.

• Denial. Think back to your college days when you felt invincible. You could eat a large pizza and barely gain a pound. You could pull consecutive all-nighters and recover quickly. As we age, our bodies change. If you’re regularly staying up late and eating and drinking at free will on business trips and on weekends, you’ll end up paying a price.

• Internalization. Part of being a guy is taking the hits and moving on. There may be personal and professional obstacles causing tremendous emotional stress, but we usually internalize them and move on. Stored up tension and anxiety manifest in other ways, such as poor sleep and eating habits. Unfortunately, this behavior also increases the risk of heart disease. Having someone to share with, whether it’s your spouse, a family member, a close friend, a co-worker or a professional therapist, can help blow off pent-up steam. Exercise and meditation are other ways to cope with internalized stress.

• The male ego. This can be a tough one. I had to set aside my own male ego to write this column. Many of us guys know that our lifestyles and habits aren’t optimal, but we resist advice from others, especially spouses and close family members. Advice with good intentions turns into “nagging,” and sometimes our behaviors are almost defiant. If this describes you, then schedule an appointment with your doctor. Most guys are OK with having their doctor tell them what to do.

Stages of deterioration

In general, it’s between ages 35 and 40 that things start breaking down in men who neglect their health. It’s happening earlier as we become increasingly sedentary and unhealthy.

I’ve broken the deterioration of the male body into three stages:

• Stage 1. If your waistline is expanding and you’re suffering more aches and pains, these are warning signs of premature aging and future problems, not a normal part of getting older. This accelerated aging is due to increased stress, decreased activity and a poor diet.

• Stage 2. Abnormal biometrics. In addition to your weight and waistline being abnormal, your other critical numbers like blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar are now out of range.

• Stage 3. This is a significant health event, resulting from poor lifestyle choices and being stubborn enough to ignore the stage 1 and 2 signs. For example, you might receive a diagnosis of diabetes, a heart attack or a herniated disk from being overweight and out of shape.

I often ask older patients, “When you reflect back on your life, what things would you have done differently?” Answers are typically, “I wish I took better care of my health,” or “I wish I spent more time with my family.” No one has ever said they wish they had worked more hours, made more money or exercised less.

Minimize your future regrets by prioritizing your health now and by being a role model for your family. Please don’t wait for stages 2 or 3 to start making changes.

Dr. Ronesh Sinha is an internal medicine physician at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation. He also provides medical consults to high-risk South Asians.

The Palo Alto Medical Foundation and column editor Arian Dasmalchi provide this monthly column.

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